Zoology

This undated image made available by Frank Peairs in 2007 shows a European corn borer. A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. (Frank Peairs/Colorado State University/Bugwood.org via AP)
August 30, 2018 - 2:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. Insects now consume about 10 percent of the globe's food, but that will increase to 15 to 20 percent by the end of the century if climate change isn't...
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This photo provided by Jessica McLachlan shows a fairy-wren. Scientists have discovered that birds can learn to recognize alarm calls of other species, essentially by learning to eavesdrop in a second language. The Australian songbird called the fairy wren isn’t born knowing other birds’ chirps, but it can learn to recognize a few “words.” In a paper published Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, in the journal Current Biology, scientists explained how they taught the birds the distress calls of other species.(Jessica McLachlan via AP)
August 02, 2018 - 2:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For birds, understanding neighborhood gossip about an approaching hawk or brown snake can mean the difference between life or death. Wild critters are known to listen to each other for clues about lurking predators, effectively eavesdropping on other species' chatter. Birds, for...
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This Aug. 11, 2017, photo provided by Cascadia Research shows a hybrid between a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin, in the foreground, swimming next to a melon-headed dolphin near Kauai, Hawaii. Scientists are touting the first sighting of the hybrid off Hawaii. It's also only the third confirmed instance of a wild-born hybrid between species in the Delphinidae family. (Kimberly A. Wood/Cascadia Research via AP)
July 31, 2018 - 2:05 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Scientists are touting the first sighting of a hybrid between a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin in the ocean off Hawaii. But don't call it a "wholphin," they say. The melon-headed whale is one of the various species that's called a whale but is technically a dolphin...
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FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2011 file photo, a dog casts a shadow in St. Petersburg, Russia. Bad dogs tend to die young, according to a British study, published on Tuesday, July 24, 2018, that says aggression, excessive barking and disobedience are among behaviors that can doom canine pets to an early demise. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
July 24, 2018 - 5:44 pm
Bad dogs tend to die young, according to a British study that says aggression, excessive barking and disobedience are among behaviors that can doom canine pets to an early demise. One in three deaths in U.K. dogs younger than 3 years old was from "undesirable" behaviors, a disproportionately high...
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This June 11, 2018 photo provided by the National Park Service shows a mountain lion kitten identified as P-68. This is one of four new mountain lion kittens found by researchers studying the wild cats living in Southern California’s Santa Monica Mountains. They’re the first litter of kittens found in the Simi Hills, a small area of habitat between the Santa Monica and Santa Susana mountains ranges just north of Los Angeles. (National Park Service via AP, File)
June 19, 2018 - 2:14 pm
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) — Four new mountain lion kittens have been found by researchers studying the wild cats living in Southern California's Santa Monica Mountains, wildlife officials announced in video posts Tuesday showing the blue-eyed babies meowing and one feisty one hissing and even...
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This undated photo provided by Rutgers University shows three Longhorned ticks: from left, a fully engorged female, a partial engorged female, and an engorged nymph. A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle of the continent. (Jim Occi/Rutgers University via AP)
June 12, 2018 - 10:12 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle...
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