Zoology

In this undated photo provided by researchers in December 2018, a male tungara frog in Panama uses his vocal sac to call out in Gamboa, Panama. A study released on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, examines why these amphibians adapt their mating calls in urban areas _ an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on forests. (Adam Dunn via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 11:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — City frogs and rainforest frogs don't sing the same tune, researchers have found. A study released Monday examined why Panama's tiny tungara frogs adapt their mating calls in urban areas — an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on...
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In this Nov. 6, 2018 photo, Puerto Rican parrots huddle in one of the flight cages located in the facilities of the Iguaca Aviary at El Yunque, were the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service runs a parrot recovery program in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service and the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. Biologists are trying to save the last of the endangered Puerto Rican parrots after more than half the population of birds disappeared when Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico and destroyed their habitat and food sources. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
November 20, 2018 - 12:25 am
EL YUNQUE, Puerto Rico (AP) — Biologists are trying to save the last of the endangered Puerto Rican parrots after more than half the population of the bright green birds with turquoise-tipped wings disappeared when Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico and destroyed their habitat and food sources. In the...
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This undated photo provided by Georgia Tech in November 2018 shows a domestic cat grooming its fur. (Candler Hobbs/Georgia Tech via AP)
November 19, 2018 - 4:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cat lovers know when kitties groom, their tongues are pretty scratchy. Using high-tech scans and some other tricks, scientists are learning how those sandpapery tongues help cats get clean and stay cool. The secret: Tiny hooks that spring up on the tongue — with scoops built in to...
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In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
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This undated photo provided by Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues shows a snake named in honor of environmental biologist Bob Thomas. Thomas us the environmental biologist and head of the Center for Environmental Communication at Loyola University New Orleans. He says he has a picture of the snake on his wall, and it makes him smile every time he looks at it. (Courtesy of Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues via AP)
October 20, 2018 - 10:28 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A Louisiana professor is in heady company, honored by having one of three newly identified species of snakes from the Galapagos Islands named after him. "They named one after Charles Darwin — that's a no-brainer — and one after the Greek god of fire, and one after me, of all...
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FILE--In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. A new scientific effort will map the genomes of critically endangered Pacific Northwest orcas to better understand their genetics and potentially find ways to save them from extinction. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
October 04, 2018 - 7:40 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A new scientific effort will sequence the genomes of critically endangered Pacific Northwest orcas to better understand their genetics and potentially find ways to save them from extinction. The collaboration announced Thursday involves scientists with the National Oceanic and...
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In this Aug. 2018 photo provided by Tom Bradley, a bear eats from a garbage can outside the Bradley family home, in Canton, Conn. Connecticut reports that human encounters with bears are on the rise. A wildlife biologist with the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection says there have been about two dozen reports this year of bears breaking into Connecticut homes and businesses, about four times the yearly average. (Tom Bradley via AP)
September 24, 2018 - 10:35 pm
CANTON, Conn. (AP) — Tom Bradley had grown accustomed to seeing black bears walk through his Connecticut neighborhood, but this month he was alarmed to find something trying to turn a doorknob to enter his house. He used his key fob to set off his car horn, to scare away whatever was in his garage...
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FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States and Canada from 1987 to 2006. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
September 20, 2018 - 1:06 am
OXFORD, Pa. (AP) — A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried. Pesky mosquitoes, disease-carrying ticks, crop-munching aphids and cockroaches are doing just fine. But the more beneficial flying insects of summer — native bees, moths,...
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September 16, 2018 - 10:47 am
There's a bumper crop of squirrels in New England, and the frenetic critters are frustrating farmers by chomping their way through apple orchards, pumpkin patches and corn fields. The varmints are fattening themselves for winter while destroying the crops with bite marks. Robert Randall, who has a...
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In this June 8, 2018 image taken from video, cows are milked at a dairy farm at the University of California, Davis, in Davis, Calif., where researchers are feeding seaweed to dairy cows in a bid to make cattle more climate-friendly. UC Davis is studying whether adding small amounts of seaweed to cattle feed can help reduce their emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that's released when cattle burp, pass gas or make manure. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
August 31, 2018 - 1:00 am
DAVIS, Calif. (AP) — University of California researchers are feeding seaweed to dairy cows in an attempt to make cattle more climate-friendly. UC Davis is studying whether adding small amounts of seaweed to cattle feed can help reduce their emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that's...
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