Zoology

In this photo released by Saudi Press Agency, SPA, Saudi King Salman, chairs a video call of world leaders from the Group of 20 and other international bodies and organizations, from his office in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, March 26, 2020. The meeting is aimed at coordinating the global response to the fast-spreading coronavirus, which has shuttered businesses and forced well over a quarter of the world's population into home isolation. (Saudi Press Agency via AP)
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March 26, 2020 - 2:25 pm
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The head of the United Nations told leaders of the world’s 20 major industrialized nations during an emergency virtual summit Thursday that "we are at war with a virus – and not winning it” despite dramatic measures by countries to seal their borders, shutter...
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In a Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019 photo, Robert T. Brown, right, president of the Maryland Waterman's Association, dredges for oysters with Matt Bernd on the Chesapeake Bay near Ridge, Md. A study estimated market-sized oysters dropped from 600 million in 1999 to about 300 million in the Maryland portion of the bay in 2018. (AP Photo/Brian Witte)
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December 23, 2019 - 11:52 am
RIDGE, Md. (AP) — Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached — a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the nation's largest estuary. On an overcast November morning,...
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FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2010, file photo, Bart Siegel of New Orleans looks through binoculars for birds during the National Audubon Society's annual Christmas bird count on the Gulf Coast in Grand Isle, La. It's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. And the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. (AP Photo/Sean Gardner, File)
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December 16, 2019 - 11:02 am
Ít's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. Today, the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. “He realized that we were over-...
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This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
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December 14, 2019 - 9:00 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
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This Nov. 20, 2019 photo provided by Oregon State University shows the skull from a blue whale skeleton being transferred to a trailer after pulling it from Yaquina Bay, Newport, Ore. The carcass of a giant blue whale that's been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about as long as two school buses, washed ashore near Gold Beach, Oregon in 2015. It's exceptionally rare to see an intact blue whale carcass wash ashore and the only other documented case happened more than 200 years ago, when the Lewis and Clark expedition noted that they saw Native Americans salvaging edible parts from a blue whale, said Bruce Mate, emeritus director of Oregon State University's Marine Mammal Institute. (Michelle Klampe/Oregon State University via AP)
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November 22, 2019 - 8:44 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The carcass of a giant blue whale that has been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, file photo, a technician releases mosquitoes that are infected with a dengue-blocking bacteria called "Wolbachia" in the Tubiacanga neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The nonprofit World Mosquito Program infected mosquitoes with that bacteria, called Wolbachia, and released them in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that agreed to be test sites. Researchers say dengue cases fell dramatically, compared to nearby communities where regular mosquitoes did the biting. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)
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November 21, 2019 - 4:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They still bite, but new research shows lab-grown mosquitoes are fighting dangerous dengue fever that they normally would spread. Dengue infections appear to be dropping fast in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that are buzzing with the specially bred...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
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November 20, 2019 - 7:09 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
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October 03, 2019 - 7:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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September 26, 2019 - 6:21 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — In a story Sept. 25 about swamp rodents, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Central Valley is an agricultural region 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of Sacramento. The Central Valley region spans about 400 miles (645 kilometers) from Redding to Bakersfield...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
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September 19, 2019 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion...
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