Workplace discrimination

FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Papa John's founder and CEO John Schnatter attends a meeting in Louisville, Ky. Schnatter is apologizing after reportedly using a racial slur during a conference call in May 2018. The apology Wednesday, July 11, 2018, comes after Forbes cited an anonymous source saying the pizza chain's marketing firm broke ties with the company afterward. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)
July 12, 2018 - 5:52 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Papa John's founder John Schnatter is no longer board chairman after using a racial slur, but his image is still part of the pizza chain's logo and he remains the company's largest shareholder. The situation illustrates the difficulty when companies are closely tied to a single...
Read More
FILE - This Sept. 14, 2017, file photo shows a Motel 6 in Phoenix. Motel 6 has tentatively agreed to settle a lawsuit that alleges it discriminated against some Latino customers at multiple Phoenix locations by giving their whereabouts and personal information to immigration agents who later arrested at least seven guests. Details of the tentative deal, revealed Friday, July 6, 2018, in court records, haven't been publicly released. (AP Photo/Anita Snow, File)
July 09, 2018 - 4:46 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Motel 6 has tentatively agreed to settle a lawsuit that alleges it discriminated against some Latino customers at two Phoenix locations by giving their whereabouts and personal information to immigration agents who later arrested at least seven guests. The lawsuit alleges Motel 6 had...
Read More
Turkey's lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex activists march despite a ban, in Istanbul, Sunday, July 1, 2018. The Istanbul LGBTI+ activists gathered in the city's Taksim neighbourhood after they announced Istanbul's local government had banned the Pride march for the fourth year in a row. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)
July 01, 2018 - 3:41 pm
ISTANBUL (AP) — Turkey's lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex activists gathered Sunday for an LGBTI pride march in Istanbul, moving from street to street for an hour as police tried to end an event the local government had banned for the fourth year in a row. Hundreds of people chanted...
Read More
Police block off the area around the home of a suspect who opened fire on a newspaper office in Maryland's capital earlier, in Laurel, Md., Thursday, June 28, 2018. A man armed with smoke grenades and a shotgun attacked journalists at a newspaper in Maryland's capital Thursday, killing several people before police quickly stormed the building and arrested him, police and witnesses said. A law enforcement official said the suspect has been identified as Jarrod W. Ramos. (AP Photo/Michael Kunzelman)
June 29, 2018 - 6:35 am
A man who police say opened fire at a Maryland newspaper office Thursday, killing five and injuring two others, had a long, acrimonious history with the newspaper, including a lawsuit and years of harassment of its journalists on Twitter. Jarrod Warren Ramos, swiftly arrested by police after the...
Read More
June 26, 2018 - 12:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Women are underrepresented in the ranks of criminal investigators and leadership roles at four of the nation's top federal law enforcement agencies. And those agencies have only taken "limited actions" to recruit more women for those positions. That's according to a new report by...
Read More
FILE- In this March 13, 2017, file photo, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich is interviewed on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Krzanich is resigning after the company learned of a consensual relationship that he had with an employee. Intel said Thursday, June 21, 2018, that the relationship was in violation of the company's non-fraternization policy, which applies to all managers. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
June 21, 2018 - 10:45 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Intel CEO Brian Krzanich resigned after the company learned of what it called a past, consensual relationship with an employee. Intel said Thursday that the relationship was in violation of the company's non-fraternization policy, which applies to all managers. Spokesman William...
Read More
FILE - In this March 31, 2011, file photo, Texas women's head track and field coach Beverly Kearney is photographed during practice in Austin, Texas. The University of Texas has agreed to settle a race and sexual discrimination lawsuit filed by former women's track coach Bev Kearney. Kearney attorney Jody Mask on Wednesday, Jun 20, 2018, told The Associated Press that the case will be dismissed. University spokesman Gary Susswein confirmed the school agreed to settle. Terms were not immediately disclosed. (Ralph Barrera/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
June 20, 2018 - 12:58 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas has agreed to settle a race and gender discrimination lawsuit filed by former women's track coach Bev Kearney, who was forced out of her job in 2013 after the school learned she had a relationship with an athlete a decade earlier. Kearney, who is black,...
Read More
June 08, 2018 - 3:19 pm
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Gov. Chris Sununu, a Republican, signed bills Friday to protect transgender people from discrimination and ban therapies that seek to change the sexual orientation of minors. The anti-discrimination law, which takes effect July 8, bans discrimination based on gender identity in...
Read More
FILE - In this May 10, 2011, file photo, Timothy Mapes, chief of staff for Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan, listens to lawmakers debate at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. Sherri Garrett, an employee in Madigan's office, on Wednesday, June 6, 2018, accused Mapes of mishandling allegations of sexual harassment on two occasions and making untoward comments to her and others in incidents from 2013 to just a few weeks ago. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
June 06, 2018 - 6:51 pm
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — The chief of staff to powerful Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan abruptly resigned Wednesday after an employee accused him of lewd comments and of mishandling complaints of sexual harassment. Sherri Garrett, a $42,000-a-year account technician for the House, told a...
Read More
June 04, 2018 - 5:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Inappropriate conduct in the federal judiciary is "not pervasive" but also "not limited to a few isolated instances," according to a report issued Monday by a group examining its policies on sexual harassment and other workplace misconduct. The group, formed at the request of...
Read More

Pages