Workers' rights

FILE - This Nov. 4, 2019, file photo shows cargo cranes at the Port of Tacoma in Tacoma, Wash. U.S lawmakers are pushing for a ban on exports from an area of northwest China following a report that found widespread use of forced labor. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
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September 22, 2020 - 5:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan bill aimed at keeping goods out of the U.S. that are made with the forced labor of detained ethnic minorities in China passed overwhelmingly Tuesday in the House of Representatives despite concerns about the potential effects on global commerce. The House voted 406-3...
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FILE - In this July 20, 2020, file photo, Audrey Reed, 8, holds up a sing through the sunroof of a car during a rally in Los Angeles. Ahead of Labor Day, major U.S. labor unions say they are considering work stoppages in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
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September 05, 2020 - 1:31 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Ahead of Labor Day, unions representing millions across several working-class sectors are threatening to authorize work stoppages in support of the Black Lives Matter movement amid calls for concrete measures that address racial injustice. In a statement first shared with The...
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FILE - In this Dec. 20, 2019 file photo, construction is underway at the Lusail Stadium, one of the 2022 World Cup stadiums, in Lusail, Qatar. A U.N. labor body says new labor rules in the energy-rich nation of Qatar “effectively dismantles” the country’s long-criticized “kafala” employment system. The International Labor Organization said Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020, that as of now, migrant workers can change jobs before the end of their contracts without obtaining the permission of their current employers. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)
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August 30, 2020 - 8:44 pm
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — New labor rules in the energy-rich nation of Qatar “effectively dismantles” the country's long-criticized “kafala” employment system, a U.N. labor body said Sunday. The International Labor Organization said as of now, migrant workers can change jobs before the end...
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FILE - President Donald Trump points to a question as he speaks during a briefing with reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, in Washington. TikTok and its U.S. employees are planning to take the Trump administration to court over a sweeping order that could ban the popular video app, according to a lawyer preparing one of the lawsuits. The employees’ legal challenge to Trump’s executive order will be separate from a pending lawsuit from the company that owns the app, says Mike Godwin, an internet policy lawyer representing the employees. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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August 13, 2020 - 7:52 pm
TikTok and its U.S. employees are planning to take President Donald Trump's administration to court over his sweeping order to ban the popular video app, according to a lawyer preparing one of the lawsuits. The employees' legal challenge to Trump's executive order will be separate from a pending...
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Strikers picket outside the district lodge of Local 6 across from Bath Iron Works, Monday, June 22, 2020, in Bath, Maine. Production workers at one of the Navy's largest shipbuilders overwhelmingly voted to strike, rejecting the company's three-year contract offer Sunday and threatening to further delay delivery of ships. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
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July 10, 2020 - 5:51 pm
Navy shipbuilder Bath Iron Works on Friday filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board, accusing its largest union of threatening workers who cross the picket line during an ongoing strike in Maine. The company accused leaders of Machinists’ Local S6 of threatening so-called scabs...
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In this Saturday, May 23, 2020 photo, an Ethiopian domestic worker cleans her employer's balcony, in Beirut, Lebanon. Some 250,000 registered migrant laborers in Lebanon — maids, garbage collectors, farm hands and construction workers — are growing more desperate as a crippling economic and financial crisis sets in, coupled with coronavirus restrictions. With no functioning airports and exorbitant costs of repatriation flights, many are trapped, unable to go home. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
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May 26, 2020 - 6:02 am
BEIRUT (AP) — Long before the pandemic struck, they lived and worked in conditions that rights groups called exploitative — low wages, long hours, no labor law protections. Now, some 250,000 registered migrant laborers in Lebanon — maids, garbage collectors, farm hands and construction workers —...
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Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Lee Jae-yong speaks during a news conference at a company's office building in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, May 6, 2020. Lee on Wednesday issued a statement of remorse but offered no clear admission of wrongdoing over his alleged involvement in a 2016 corruption scandal that spurred massive street protests and sent South Korea’s then-president to prison. (Kim Hong-Ji/Pool Photo via AP)
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May 06, 2020 - 5:58 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Samsung heir Lee Jae-yong on Wednesday expressed remorse but did not admit to wrongdoing over his alleged involvement in a 2016 corruption scandal that spurred massive street protests and sent South Korea’s then-president to prison. The vice chairman of Samsung Electronics...
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FILE - In this April 9, 2020 file photo, employees observe social distancing due to coronavirus, at the entrance of Amazon, in Douai, northern France.A French court has ordered Amazon to stop buying, storing or delivering non-essential goods for the next month to protect its employees from the virus. The emergency ruling Tuesday requires Amazon to evaluate health risks at all its facilities nationwide and negotiate new safety measures with worker representatives, according to lawyers for unions that launched the legal proceedings. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler, File)
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April 14, 2020 - 2:08 pm
PARIS (AP) — A French court has ordered Amazon to stop selling, receiving or delivering non-essential goods for the next month to protect its employees from the virus. Amazon protested Tuesday’s emergency ruling, while unions hailed it as a victory for workers' rights and public health. The ruling...
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FILE - In this April 19, 2018 file photo, trainees work at Snowtex garment factory in Dhamrai, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. A survey of factory owners in Bangladesh has found that major fashion retailers that are closing shops and laying off workers in Europe and the U.S. also are canceling their sometimes already completed orders, as workers often go unpaid. A report released Friday, March 27, 2020, by Mark Anner, director of the Center of Global Rights, found the coronavirus crisis has resulted in millions of factory workers being sent home without the wages or severance they are owed. About 4.1 million people work in apparel factories in Bangladesh, the world's No. 2 garment exporter after China. (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad, File)
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March 30, 2020 - 4:59 am
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Bangladesh garment manufacturers says fashion retailers have cancelled or put on hold more than $3 billion in orders due to the coronavirus outbreak, though a handful have agreed to pay anyway. The data from the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association...
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In this June 5, 2019, photo, residents of the Hui Muslim ethnic minority walk in a neighborhood near an OFILM factory in Nanchang in eastern China's Jiangxi province. The Associated Press has found that OFILM, a supplier of major multinational companies, employs Uighurs, an ethnic Turkic minority, under highly restrictive conditions, including not letting them leave the factory compound without a chaperone, worship, or wear headscarves. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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March 11, 2020 - 10:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. lawmakers pushed Wednesday for a ban on imports from a vast area of northwestern China because of the widespread use of forced labor in a region where the communist government has detained more than a million people in a campaign against ethnic minorities. The U.S. already...
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