Wildlife

July 19, 2018 - 4:20 pm
BATAVIA, N.Y. (AP) — Police responding to a 911 hang-up call from an abandoned building in western New York found something they weren't expecting: a 4-foot-long (1.2-meter) alligator. WKBW-TV in Buffalo reports officers in the city of Batavia were checking out the inside of the building on Monday...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2018 file photo, the Richmond city skyline can be seen on the horizon behind the coal ash ponds along the James River near Dominion Energy's Chesterfield Power Station in Chester, Va. The Trump administration is easing rules for handling toxic coal ash from more than 400 coal-fired power plants across the U.S. after utilities objected to regulations adopted under former President Barack Obama. Environmental Protection Agency acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler said Wednesday, July 18, 2018, the changes will save utilities roughly $30 million annually. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
July 18, 2018 - 9:45 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration on Wednesday eased rules for handling toxic coal ash from more than 400 U.S. coal-fired power plants after utilities pushed back against regulations adopted under former President Barack Obama. Environmental Protection Agency acting Administrator Andrew...
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Six Flags Great Adventure & Safari
July 18, 2018 - 10:56 am
These little siblings may still be learning to walk, but that doesn’t mean they can’t play around!
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In this Oct. 30, 2017, photo provided by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Wildlife Biologist Jason Hawley affixes a GPS tracking collar on a bobcat at the Sessions Woods Wildlife Management in Burlington, Conn. GPS collars were placed on several dozen bobcats in the fall of 2017 to track their movements. The collars are programmed to fall off on and after Aug. 1, 2018. The agency wants to find all the collars, recharge the batteries and place them on other bobcats in the fall to continue the study. (Paul Fusco/Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection via AP)
July 14, 2018 - 8:00 am
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — In a couple of weeks, collars on cats across the state will be falling off. But it's not some prank or devious experiment — it's one of the largest studies of its kind on bobcats. The GPS collars were placed on 50 bobcats last fall as part of research by wildlife biologists...
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This 1975 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a cluster of smallpox viruses. On Friday, July 13, 2018, U.S. regulators announced the approval of the first treatment for smallpox _ a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago _ in case the virus is used in a terror attack. (Fred Murphy/CDC via AP)
July 13, 2018 - 7:08 pm
U.S. regulators Friday approved the first treatment for smallpox — a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago — in case the virus is used in a terror attack. Smallpox, which is highly contagious, was eradicated worldwide by 1980 after a huge vaccination campaign. But people born since...
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FILE - In this file photo taken on Saturday Jan.14, 2006, a 4-year old Female black Rhino, runs after it was darted at Nairobi National Park. A Kenyan wildlife official on Friday, July 13, 2018 says seven critically endangered black rhinos are dead following an attempt to move them from the capital to a national park hundreds of kilometers away. (AP Photo/Sayyid Abdul Azim, File)
July 13, 2018 - 10:59 am
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Eight critically endangered black rhinos are dead in Kenya after wildlife workers moved them from the capital to a new national park, the government said Friday, calling the toll "unprecedented" in more than a decade of such transfers. Preliminary investigations point to salt...
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Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
July 13, 2018 - 10:53 am
If at first you don’t succeed -- try and try again!
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Rancher Dwight Hammond Jr., center, is embraced after arriving by private jet at the Burns Municipal Airport, Wednesday, July 11, 2018, in Burns, Ore. Hammond and his son Steven, convicted of intentionally setting fires on public land in Oregon, were pardoned by President Donald Trump on Tuesday, July 10. (Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian via AP)
July 12, 2018 - 12:58 am
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Father and son ranchers, who were the focus of a battle about public lands and were freed from prison after receiving a presidential pardon, were welcomed home Wednesday in Oregon by relatives and horseback riders carrying American flags. A lawyer for the family of Steven and...
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Pacific Marine Mammal Center
July 11, 2018 - 4:38 pm
These lovable sea lions are racing towards the ocean to go back home.
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FILE - In this Jan. 2, 2016, file photo, rancher Dwight Hammond Jr. greets protesters outside his home in Burns, Ore. President Donald Trump has pardoned Dwight and Steven Hammond, two ranchers whose case sparked the armed occupation of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon. The Hammonds were convicted in 2012 of intentionally and maliciously setting fires on public lands. (Les Zaitz/The Oregonian via AP, File)
July 10, 2018 - 4:40 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Two imprisoned ranchers who were convicted in 2012 of intentionally setting fires on public land in Oregon will be freed after President Donald Trump pardoned them on Tuesday. The move by Trump raised concerns that others would be encouraged to actively oppose federal control of...
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