Wildlife

August 26, 2018 - 5:41 pm
LIHUE, Hawaii (AP) — An Alabama man was fined $1,500 for touching a Hawaiian monk seal as well as harassing a sea turtle on Kauai, and then posting the videos on social media. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, said the Alabama resident, who was vacationing on Kauai last...
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In this Dec. 19, 2014, photo, a worker digs in a fermentation bed at an organic pig farm in Handan in northern China's Hebei province. China, the world's largest producer of pork, is battling an African swine fever outbreak that could potentially devastate herds. Authorities say the disease, which is fatal only to pigs and wild boar, has been detected in multiple locations across the vast country. (Chinatopix via AP)
August 23, 2018 - 3:39 am
BEIJING (AP) — China has reported another outbreak of African swine fever that threatens the country's crucial pork industry, but officials say they have the situation under control. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said Thursday the latest cases were reported in the eastern city of...
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File - This March 16, 2017, file photo released by the Bannock County Sheriff's Office shows a cyanide device in Pocatello, Idaho, The cyanide device, called M-44, is spring-activated and shoots poison that is meant to kill predators. The U.S. government says an Idaho boy and his parents are to blame for any injuries to the boy claimed in a lawsuit contending he was doused with cyanide by a predator-killing trap a federal worker mistakenly placed near their home. The U.S. Department of Justice in documents filed Monday, Aug. 20, 2018, in U.S. District Court says any injuries were caused by the negligence of the parents and child, and the lawsuit should be dismissed. (Bannock County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
August 22, 2018 - 5:12 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The U.S. government said an Idaho family is to blame for any injuries it alleges a boy received after he was doused with cyanide by a predator-killing trap that a federal worker mistakenly placed near their home. Any injuries were caused by the negligence of the parents and...
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In this Dec. 19, 2014, photo, a worker digs in a fermentation bed at an organic pig farm in Handan in northern China's Hebei province. China, the world's largest producer of pork, is battling an African swine fever outbreak that could potentially devastate herds. Authorities say the disease, which is fatal only to pigs and wild boar, has been detected in multiple locations across the vast country. (Chinatopix via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 12:11 am
BEIJING (AP) — China, the world's largest producer of pork, is battling an African swine fever outbreak that could potentially devastate herds. The disease, which only affects pigs and wild boar, has been detected in at least three locations across the vast country. Thousands of pigs have died or...
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In this July 29, 2017 photo provided by KYUK-TV shows a gray whale that was killed in the Kuskokwim River is butchered and the meat and blubber distributed. Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, according to a federal investigative report. The report, released to The Associated Press through a public records, says that after the shooting began, the hunters then believed the whale to be a bowhead and that the harvest would be theirs as the first to shoot or harpoon it. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided not to prosecute the hunters. Instead it sent letters advising leaders in three villages about the limits to subsistence whaling. (Katie Basile/KYUK via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 7:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, a federal investigative report said. After the...
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FILE - In this June 27, 2005, file photo, an Arctic grayling is shown in Emerald Lake in Bozeman, Mont. A federal appeals court says U.S. wildlife officials did not consider all environmental factors when it decided against designating a Montana fish as a threatened or endangered species. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday, Aug. 17, 2018, sent a lawsuit seeking federal protections for the Arctic grayling back to a lower court for further consideration. (Ben Pierce/Bozeman Daily Chronicle via AP, File)
August 17, 2018 - 7:54 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — An appeals court on Friday told a judge to take another look at whether a Montana fish should be protected, saying that U.S. wildlife officials did not consider all environmental factors when they decided against designating the Arctic grayling as a threatened or endangered...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018, file photo, Atlanta Falcons head coach Dan Quinn is shown during their NFL training camp football practice in Flowery Branch, Ga. Quinn said he's had a spot "removed or checked on" in annual skin cancer checks during physical exams. He and some of his assistants normally wear long shirts under their T-shirts during practice _ despite the Georgia heat and humidity. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
August 17, 2018 - 5:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The toughest opponent for many NFL players and coaches during the blazing hot days of training camp sits far above the football field. The sun's powerful ultraviolet rays are a leading cause of skin cancer, and shade is rare at most practice sites. So, slathered-on sunscreen, big...
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In this Aug. 5, 2018, photo, students sit in front of building that houses the headquarters of Sinarmas Group, one of Indonesia's largest palm oil company, in Jakarta, Indonesia. The main global group for certifying sustainable wood has suspended plans to give its influential endorsement to Indonesian paper giant Sinarmas after revelations it cut down tropical forests and used an opaque corporate structure to hide its activities. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
August 16, 2018 - 6:43 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The main global group for certifying sustainable wood has suspended plans to give its influential endorsement to Indonesian paper giant Sinarmas after revelations it cut down tropical forests and used an opaque corporate structure to hide its activities. The Forest...
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In this image made from video provided by NASA, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev flings a Sirius nano-satellite into orbit from the International Space Station on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018. (NASA via AP)
August 15, 2018 - 8:18 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Spacewalking cosmonauts set up an antenna for tracking birds on Earth and sent a series of tiny satellites flying from the International Space Station on Wednesday. Russian Sergey Prokopyev used his gloved right hand to fling four research satellites into space. The...
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Armada Chile
August 15, 2018 - 10:28 am
This is really a whale of a tale!
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