Water pollution

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., left, shakes hands as she arrives at a campaign meet-and-greet at To Share Brewing, Friday, March 15, 2019, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
March 15, 2019 - 8:53 pm
MERRIMACK, N.H. (AP) — Democratic presidential hopeful Kirsten Gillibrand is trying to connect with voters' important issues on the ground — or, in some cases, underground. The U.S. senator from New York held two roundtable discussions Friday in New Hampshire communities struggling with...
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FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 4, 2017 file photo, pyres of ivory are set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. According to a scientific report from the United Nations released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
March 13, 2019 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says. Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics,...
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March 12, 2019 - 5:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is proposing to allow year-round sales of gasoline mixed with 15 percent ethanol, seeking to calm a dispute that has riled two politically important blocs — the oil industry and corn farmers. Tuesday's proposed rule change by the Environmental Protection...
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FILE - This Aug. 7, 2014, image shows a contract employee watching a crews excavate contaminated soil at a site where millions of gallons of jet fuel leaked underground over decades at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M. After excavating thousands of tons of soil and treating millions of gallons of water, New Mexico regulators say the U.S. Air Force still has work to do to clean up the contamination. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
March 11, 2019 - 6:13 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Air Force has excavated thousands of tons of soil and treated millions of gallons of water contaminated by jet fuel at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city, but state regulators say the military still has more cleanup to do. The New Mexico environment...
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Rep. Harley Rouda, D-Calif., speaks during a House Oversight and Reform subcommittee hearing on PFAS chemicals and their risks on Wednesday, March 6, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
March 06, 2019 - 4:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cleaning up and protecting U.S. drinking water from a class of toxic chemicals used in many household items could cost in the tens of billions of dollars nationally, including $2 billion for the Department of Defense alone, witnesses testified Wednesday before a House panel urging...
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March 05, 2019 - 7:17 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico on Tuesday sued the U.S. Air Force over groundwater contamination at two bases, saying the federal government has a responsibility to clean up plumes of toxic chemicals left behind by past military firefighting activities. The contamination — linked to a class of...
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In this image from video provided the Environmental Protection Agency, Associated Press reporter Ellen Knickmeyer, in white, being pushed by a security guard out of EPA headquarters on May 22, 2018, in Washington. Newly released security camera footage discredits Trump administration claims that Knickmeyer tried to force her way into EPA headquarters to cover a summit on drinking water contaminants. Video obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request shows a security guard grab Knickmeyer by the shoulders and shove her out of the agency’s lobby. (EPA via AP)
February 26, 2019 - 5:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Security camera footage released Tuesday undermines Trump administration claims that a reporter for The Associated Press tried to force her way into the Environmental Protection Agency headquarters to cover a summit last year on drinking water contaminants. Video obtained through...
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February 19, 2019 - 3:25 pm
A Minnesota environmental group filed a federal lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency Tuesday, seeking to force it to make public the concerns its specialists have expressed about a copper-nickel mine in the northeast of the state. Environmentalists worry PolyMet Mining's planned $1...
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In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, police office guards the main entrance to the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court has agreed to consider a case about the reach of a federal clean water law. The justices agreed Tuesday to hear a case involving the Clean Water Act. The act requires polluters to get a permit when they release pollution from a source such as a pipe or well to certain bodies of water such as rivers and lakes that are called "navigable waters." The case involves treated wastewater from the Lahaina Wastewater Reclamation Facility in Hawaii.(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
February 19, 2019 - 11:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has agreed to consider a case about the reach of a federal clean water law. The justices agreed Tuesday to hear a case involving the Clean Water Act. The act requires polluters to get a permit when they release pollution from a source such as a pipe or well to...
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FILE- In this Oct. 16, 2017, file photo Ted Ryfiak shows a clump of resin and scraps found in his backyard along House Street NE in Belmont, Mich. Ryfiak and his neighbors along House Street NE have had their water polluted with perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl compounds, or PFAS compounds. The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce a plan for dealing with a class of long-lasting chemical contaminants amid complaints from members of Congress and environmentalists that it's not moved aggressively enough to regulate them. (Nic Antaya/The Grand Rapids Press-MLive.com via AP)
February 14, 2019 - 1:12 pm
Under pressure from Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday that it would move toward setting safety limits for a class of highly toxic chemicals contaminating drinking water in several states. Environmentalists countered that the agency wasn't moving fast enough. Acting EPA...
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