Violations of environmental law

FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mechanized shovel loads a haul truck with coal at the Spring Creek coal mine near Decker, Mont. A judge says U.S. officials should reconsider the climate change effects of expanding the mine. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
February 12, 2019 - 2:17 pm
BILLLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials have again been faulted by a federal judge for failing to adequately consider the potential climate change effects of expanding a massive coal mine in the sagebrush-covered hills of southeastern Montana. U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy Cavan recommended in a...
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February 01, 2019 - 6:49 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration is appealing a court ruling that blocked the Keystone XL oil pipeline. Justice Department attorneys on Friday appealed the November ruling from U.S. District Judge Brian Morris that blocked a construction permit for the 1,184-mile (1,900-kilometer)...
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FILE - In this June 25, 2014 file photo, a group of immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador, who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, are stopped in Granjeno, Texas. During the longest-ever government shutdown, the federal judiciary has remained open, allowing the wheels of justice to keep turning in most criminal cases. In November, after a federal judge in California blocked the Trump administration from enforcing a ban on asylum for immigrants who illegally cross the southern border, government attorneys hurriedly asked a federal appeals court, then the U.S. Supreme Court, to suspend the order, terming illegal border crossings an "ongoing and increasing crisis." Both courts denied the government's request. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
January 19, 2019 - 11:12 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — During the longest-ever government shutdown, the federal judiciary has remained open, allowing the wheels of justice to keep turning in most criminal cases. But many civil cases have come to a halt because the U.S. Department of Justice doesn't have enough attorneys working to...
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FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2018, file photo, a sign marks a trailhead at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Broomfield, Colo., outside Denver. Activists are asking a judge to unseal documents from a 27-year-old criminal investigation into the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant outside Denver. The groups said Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 the documents could show whether the federal government did enough to clean up the site before turning part of it into a wildlife refuge and opening it to the public. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski,File)
January 10, 2019 - 5:37 pm
DENVER (AP) — Activists asked a U.S. judge Thursday to make documents public from a 27-year-old criminal investigation into a former nuclear weapons plant outside Denver with a history of fires, leaks and spills. The activists said the documents could show whether the federal government did enough...
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FILE - In this May 6, 2014, file photo, a vehicle moves past a sign outside Fiat Chrysler Automobiles world headquarters in Auburn Hills, Mich. Fiat Chrysler will pay more than $650 million to settle allegations that it cheated on emissions tests involving more than 104,000 Jeep SUVs and Ram pickup trucks, a person with the knowledge of the settlement told The Associated Press on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
January 09, 2019 - 8:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fiat Chrysler will pay more than $650 million to settle allegations that it cheated on emissions tests involving more than 104,000 Jeep SUVs and Ram pickup trucks, a person with the knowledge of the settlement told The Associated Press on Wednesday. The Italian-American automaker...
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File - In this Nov. 18, 2018 file photo, volunteer members of an El Dorado County search and rescue team search the ruins of a home, looking for human remains, in Paradise, Calif., following a wildfire. Authorities have deployed a powerful tool to aid in their race to identify the remains of 77 bodies burned in the deadly wildfire that ripped through Northern California: Rapid DNA testing that produces results in just two hours. But the technology that can match DNA to bone fragments in as little as two hours is only as effective as the numbers of people who show up to give a sample, and so far there are not nearly enough volunteers. (AP Photo/Sudhin Thanawala, File)
November 20, 2018 - 11:13 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on California's wildfires (all times local): 8 p.m. A California sheriff says the list of names of those unaccounted for after a deadly wildfire has increased to 870. Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea says the additional 171 names came from a backlog of voicemails...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, left, and Energy Secretary Rick Perry, is seen in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, during the announcing of the approval of a permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline, clearing the way for the $8 billion project.A federal judge in Montana has blocked construction of the $8 billion Keystone XL Pipeline to allow more time to study the project's potential environmental impact. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris' order on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, came as Calgary-based TransCanada was preparing to build the first stages of the oil pipeline in northern Montana. Environmental groups had sued TransCanada and The U.S. Department of State in federal court in Great Falls. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
November 09, 2018 - 2:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a setback for the Trump administration, a federal judge has blocked a permit for construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada and ordered officials to conduct a new environmental review. Environmentalists and tribal groups cheered the ruling by a U.S. district judge...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2017 file photo, the parents of a 7-week old red wolf pup keep an eye on their offspring at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C. Conservationists told a judge Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018, that an imminent federal plan to shrink the territory of the only wild red wolves would hasten the animal’s extinction. Lawyers for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, however, countered that new rules for the red wolf program, set to be finalized next month, mean that the conservationists’ current arguments are moot. The federal lawyers say a new lawsuit would need to be filed to halt new plans set to be finalized by the end of November. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
October 17, 2018 - 5:43 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Conservationists told a federal judge Wednesday that an imminent government plan to shrink the territory of the only red wolves living in the wild would hasten the animal's extinction in violation of federal law. Lawyers for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, however,...
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This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 2:39 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
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FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2013 photo, a grizzly bear cub rests near a cabin a few miles from the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Gardiner, Mont. A court ruling Monday, Sept. 24, 2018, that blocked grizzly bear hunts in the U.S. West carries far wider political implications amid a push by Congress for sweeping changes to how imperiled species are managed. (Alan Rogers/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP, File)
September 26, 2018 - 6:10 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Galvanized by court rulings protecting grizzly bears and gray wolves, Congressional Republicans on Wednesday pushed sweeping changes to the Endangered Species Act despite strong objections from Democrats and wildlife advocates who called the effort a "wildlife extinction...
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