United States Census

In this Monday, June 3, 2019, photo, Orange County Commissioner Emily Bonilla looks at a map of Orange County and the city of Orlando in Orlando, Fla. Bonilla is worried her district in metro Orlando will be undercounted during next spring's once-in-a-decade head count of everybody in the United States because of who lives there: new arrivals, immigrants, the poor, renters and people living in rural areas who sometimes regard government with suspicion. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
June 04, 2019 - 6:51 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Emily Bonilla is worried her district in metro Orlando will be undercounted during next spring's once-in-a-decade head count of everybody in the United States because of who lives there: new arrivals, immigrants, the poor, renters and rural residents who sometimes regard...
Read More
U.S. Attorney General William Barr, right, listens to concerns raised about public safety in rural Alaska during at a roundtable discussion at the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium on Wednesday, May 29, 2019, in Anchorage, Alaska. Barr did not take questions from reporters in his first public appearance after former special prosecutor Robert Mueller spoke to reporters after resigning at the completion of his report into Russian interference into the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
June 03, 2019 - 8:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are moving to hold Trump administration officials in contempt of Congress for failing to comply with subpoenas for documents related to the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, chairman...
Read More
June 03, 2019 - 7:28 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Justice Department lawyers say new claims casting the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census in a devious light are false. The lawyers filed papers late Monday in Manhattan federal court in advance of a Wednesday hearing. The hearing was called after opponents of...
Read More
FILE - In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas. Computer files discovered in the home of Tom Hofeller , a Republican operative who died last year, contain a blueprint for how the GOP could extend its domination of legislatures in states where growing Latino populations favor Democrats and offer compelling context about a related case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court. Many of the state's top Republicans, including Paxton, have publicly expressed support for a citizenship question on the Census. (Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File,)
May 31, 2019 - 4:04 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Computer files discovered in the home of a Republican operative who died last year contain a blueprint for how the GOP could extend its domination of legislatures in states where growing Latino populations favor Democrats and offer compelling context about a related case...
Read More
FILE - In this April 23, 2019 file photo, immigration activists rally outside the Supreme Court as the justices hear arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, in Washington. A new court filing Thursday, May 30 by lawyers opposing adding the citizenship question to the 2020 census alleges a longtime Republican redistricting expert played a key role in making the change. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
May 31, 2019 - 8:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — A Republican redistricting expert advocated for adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census to give an electoral edge to white people and Republicans, opponents of the move alleged in a court filing Thursday. The filing in Manhattan federal court said a trove of newly...
Read More
May 09, 2019 - 12:18 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — As Mother's Day approaches this Sunday, a new study by the U.S. Census Bureau suggests that the likelihood of having your parents alive as you grow older is linked to poverty, educational attainment, sex and race. The working paper presented at a conference in March says that...
Read More
In this Friday, April 26, 2019, photo, Esperanza Guevara, with the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, left, snaps a picture in front of a census campaign poster of volunteers Angeles Rosales, second from left, Janet Mendez, right, and organizer Diana Escamilla at their office in Los Angeles. States are spending millions of dollars on outreach and promotion, connecting with nonprofits and working with cities in an effort to ensure that as many of their residents as possible are counted in the upcoming census. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
May 02, 2019 - 11:58 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Many states are spending millions to make sure their residents fill out next year's census form. One main reason is that activists and others fear that a question about citizenship that the Trump administration wants to add to the form could scare off Hispanics and other...
Read More
FILE - In this April 3, 2019 file photo, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey talks to reporters outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington following a meeting with President Donald Trump. It's not just Democratic-leaning states at risk of losing federal money and clout in Congress if the Supreme Court says the upcoming census can include a citizenship question. Fast-growing Arizona, Florida and Texas all have large groups of immigrants, especially Hispanics, who might choose to sit out the census, but are led by Republicans who seem unconcerned about the potential for an undercount and the resulting loss of representation in Congress. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
April 28, 2019 - 1:28 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — It's not just Democratic-leaning states at risk of losing federal money and clout in Congress if the Supreme Court says the upcoming census can include a citizenship question. Fast-growing Arizona, Florida and Texas all have large groups of immigrants, especially Hispanics, who might...
Read More
From left, New York City Census Director Julie Menin, New York State Attorney General Letitia James, and Dale Ho, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union, leaves after the Supreme Court heard arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, in Washington, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Critics say adding the question would discourage many immigrants from being counted, leading to an inaccurate count. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
April 23, 2019 - 9:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Supreme Court arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census (all times local): 4 p.m. The Supreme Court's conservative majority appears ready to uphold the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020...
Read More
Immigration activists rally outside the Supreme Court as the justices hear arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, in Washington, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Critics say the citizenship question on the census will inhibit responses from immigrant-heavy communities that are worried the information will be used to target them for possible deportation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
April 23, 2019 - 4:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite evidence that millions of Hispanics and immigrants could go uncounted, the Supreme Court's conservative majority seemed ready Tuesday to uphold the Trump administration's plan to inquire about U.S. citizenship on the 2020 census in a case that could affect American...
Read More

Pages