Statutes

FILE - In this Feb. 2, 2019 file photo Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, gestures as his wife, Pam, listens during a press conference in the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. A commission Northam tasked with researching racist laws from the state’s past recommended Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019, that dozens be repealed in order to purge the state’s books of discriminatory language. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
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December 05, 2019 - 6:47 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The laws are still on the books in Virginia: Blacks and whites must sit in separate rail cars. They cannot use the same playgrounds, schools or mental hospitals. They can’t marry each other either. The measures have not been enforced for decades, but they remain in the state’s...
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FILE - This undated file photo shows Indiana Reformatory booking shots of John Dillinger, stored in the state archives. A judge will hear an Indianapolis cemetery's bid Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2019, to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a relative of the 1930s gangster who wants to exhume Dillinger’s gravesite to determine if the notorious criminal is actually buried there. (Indiana State Archives/The Indianapolis Star via AP, File)
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December 04, 2019 - 1:35 pm
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A judge dismissed a lawsuit Wednesday by a nephew of 1930s gangster John Dillinger who wants to exhume the notorious criminal's Indianapolis gravesite to prove whether he's actually buried there, ruling that he must get the cemetery's permission. Marion County Superior Court...
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Sexual abuse lawsuits
iStock/Getty Images
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November 30, 2019 - 2:07 pm
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The loosening of limits on sexual abuse claims in New Jersey is expected to create a tectonic shift in the way those lawsuits are brought, giving hope to victims who have long suffered in silence and exposing a broader spectrum of institutions to potential liability. A law...
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Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, right, shakes hands with Rep. Mark Rozzi, D-Berks, after signing legislation into law at Muhlenberg High School in Reading, Pa., Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. Wolf approved legislation Tuesday to give future victims of child sexual abuse more time to file lawsuits and to end time limits for police to file criminal charges. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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November 26, 2019 - 6:08 pm
READING, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania overhauled its child sexual abuse laws Tuesday, more than a year after a landmark grand jury report showed the cover-up of hundreds of cases of abuse in most of Pennsylvania’s Roman Catholic dioceses over seven decades. The central bill signed by Gov. Tom Wolf gives...
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FILE- In this Jan. 15, 2019, file photo an America flag flies at the Pennsylvania Capitol building in Harrisburg, Pa. Pennsylvania lawmakers are expected to make the final vote on a bill to provide more time to file charges or lawsuits over cases of sexual abuse after a debate roiled by last year’s grand jury report into child molestation by Roman Catholic priests. A state House Republican spokesman says the chamber will vote Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, likely sending it to Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
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November 21, 2019 - 2:52 pm
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The state where a grand jury’s groundbreaking report set off a new wave of reckoning over sexual abuse in the Roman Catholic Church passed legislation Thursday giving victims more time to sue and police more time to file charges. The Pennsylvania House sent the statute-of-...
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FILE -- In this May 29, 2015 file photo, Rene Bruelhart, director of the Financial Information Authority, an institution established by Pope Benedict XVI in 2010 to monitor the monetary and commercial activities of Vatican agencies, speaks during a press conference at the Vatican. Pope Francis on Monday, Nov. 18, 2019, replaced Brulhart amid continuing fallout from a controversial Vatican police raid on the agency’s offices that jeopardized the Holy See’s international financial reputation. The Vatican said the replacement’s name would be released next week. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
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November 18, 2019 - 2:54 pm
VATICAN CITY (AP) — The head of the Vatican’s financial watchdog agency is leaving his post after a raid by Vatican police on the agency’s offices breached the Holy See’s international financial obligations and jeopardized its reputation. Pope Francis thanked Rene Bruelhart for his work as...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
November 12, 2019 - 12:30 pm
MILAN (AP) — Italian insurer Generali launched a new business Tuesday to cover art works, engaging as a poster boy the contemporary artist Maurizio Cattelan, whose gold-covered statute valued at 2.4 million euros ($2.6 million) was stolen last year from an English castle. Cattelan declined to...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks at a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. Newsom has signed a law giving child sexual assault victims more time to file lawsuits. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
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October 13, 2019 - 10:35 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California is giving childhood victims of sexual abuse more time to decide whether to file lawsuits, joining several states in expanding the statute of limitations for victims over warnings from school districts that the new rules could bankrupt them. The law signed Sunday...
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A view of the E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. A U.S. appeals court is voicing broad skepticism about the Trump administration's work requirements for low-income Medicaid recipients. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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October 11, 2019 - 3:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court on Friday sharply questioned the Trump administration's work requirements for Medicaid recipients, casting doubt on a key part of a governmentwide effort to place conditions on low-income people seeking taxpayer-financed assistance. All three judges on a...
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Alaska Supreme Court Justice Craig Stowers listens to arguments in a lawsuit that claims state policy on fossil fuels is harming the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019, in Anchorage, Alaska. Sixteen Alaska youths in 2017 sued the state, claiming that human-caused greenhouse gas emission leading to climate change is creating long-term, dangerous health effects. They lost in Superior Court, but appealed to Alaska's highest court. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 09, 2019 - 8:52 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska law promoting fossil fuel development infringes on the constitutional rights of young residents to a healthy environment, a lawyer told Alaska Supreme Court justices on Wednesday. A lawsuit filed by 16 Alaska youths claimed long-term effects of climate change will...
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