Soft drink manufacturing

FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2019, file photo, an advertisement for Pepsi is shown downtown for the NFL Super Bowl 53 football game in Atlanta. PepsiCo says it's buying energy drink maker Rockstar Energy Beverages for $3.85 billion. PepsiCo and Coca-Cola have moved aggressively in their pursuit of consumers that have a much wider variety of drinks to choose from than just years ago. The acquisition announced Wednesday, March 11, 2020 expands PepsiCo's portfolio of energy drinks, which already includes Mountain Dew's Kickstart, GameFuel and AMP. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 11, 2020 - 7:36 am
NEW YORK (AP) — PepsiCo is buying the energy drink maker Rockstar Energy Beverages for $3.85 billion. PepsiCo and Coca-Cola have moved aggressively in their pursuit of consumers that have a much wider variety of drinks to choose from than several ago. Both must compete with smaller seltzer, soda,...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
January 29, 2020 - 1:55 pm
BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — The latest issue of the Hungarian edition of Forbes magazine has been recalled from newsstands due to a court ruling regarding privacy concerns, the magazine said Wednesday. According to a statement from Forbes, the owners of Hell Energy, a Hungarian energy drink...
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FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2016, file photo, crushed plastic bottles sit in a bale following sorting at the Mid-America Recycling plant, in Lincoln, Neb. Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo and Keurig Dr. Pepper are investing $100 million to improve U.S. bottle recycling and processing. (Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 29, 2019 - 2:38 pm
Every year, an estimated 100 billion plastic bottles are produced in the U.S., the bulk of which come from three of America's biggest beverage companies: Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Keurig Dr Pepper. The problem? Only one-third of those bottles get recycled; the rest end up in the trash. That bleak trend...
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FILE - In this March 20, 2010, file photo, a ball flicks through the net in front of the NCAA logo on the marquis during an NCAA college basketball practice in Pittsburgh. Defying the NCAA, California's governor signed a first-in-the-nation law Monday, Sept. 30, that will let college athletes hire agents and make money from endorsements — a move that could upend amateur sports in the U.S. and trigger a legal challenge. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 30, 2019 - 9:16 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Defying the NCAA, California opened the way Monday for college athletes to hire agents and make money from endorsement deals with sneaker companies, soft drink makers, car dealerships and other sponsors, just like the pros. The first-in-the-nation law, signed by Democratic...
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Elaine Younger, 11, and Tahvion Williams, 14, right, load water in their family's van at the Newark Health Department in Newark, N.J., Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Residents began picking up bottled water on Monday, days after elevated lead levels were found in homes where city-issued filters had been distributed months ago as part of an ongoing effort to combat contamination. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
August 15, 2019 - 6:48 pm
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey's largest city faced off in court Thursday against an environmental group seeking to force officials to expand the distribution of bottled water to more residents facing potentially high lead levels. The arguments in federal court came days after the U.S...
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FILE - This Nov. 10, 2005, file photo shows a bottle of Poland Spring water in Fryeburg, Maine. The Maine-based company announced a plan on Monday, June 3, 3019, to use 100% recycled plastic for all its noncarbonated water containers by 2022. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, file)
June 03, 2019 - 4:00 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Poland Spring announced Monday a plan to use 100% recycled plastic for all its noncarbonated water containers, a move that comes amid growing concern about plastic pollution. The Maine-based company said the effort kicks off this month with 1-liter bottles. By 2022, the...
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FILE - In this Dec. 25, 2018, file photo a person uses a soda fountain dispenser at the Back Bowl bowling alley in Eagle, Colo. A new study bolsters evidence that soda taxes can reduce sales but whether they influence health remains unclear. The new results were published Tuesday, May 14, 2019, in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)
May 14, 2019 - 11:16 am
A new study bolsters evidence that soda taxes can reduce sales, but whether they influence health remains unclear. The research found that Philadelphia's 2017 tax led to a 38 percent decline in sugary soda and diet drink sales that year, even when taking into account an increase in sales in...
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FILE- In this Feb. 5, 2019, file photo trader Michael Urkonis works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The U.S. stock market opens at 9:30 a.m. EST on Thursday, Feb. 14. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
February 14, 2019 - 12:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New figures showing that last month's holiday sales were far worse than previously expected helped drive stocks lower on Wall Street Thursday, threatening to end a four-day winning streak for the S&P 500 index. The surprise drop in December sales, the worst in the decade, sank a...
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FILE - This Feb. 9, 2017, file photo shows Kind snack bars on display at a supermarket in New York. The government’s definition of healthy came under scrutiny in late 2015, when the FDA warned Kind that its snack bars had too much fat to use the term. Kind pushed back, saying the fat came from nuts. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
October 30, 2018 - 9:58 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Pizza bagels, chewing gum and bottled water want to play a starring new role in our diets: Foods that can be called healthy. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is revamping its definition of healthy to reflect our changing understanding of nutrition science. The push is fueling...
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In this Sept. 24, 2018, a sign posted on a drink cooler in a store gives information about a soda tax that took effect in January, in Seattle. In the wake of Seattle's new tax on sugary beverages, a group backed by millions of dollars from the soda industry will ask voters in November whether to prevent other cities and counties in Washington from following suit. Under Initiative 1634, local governments would no longer be able to impose their own taxes on sodas, other sugary beverages and on food items. (AP Photo/Lisa Baumann)
October 24, 2018 - 3:23 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Soda industry giants including the Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo, Inc. are spending more than $20 million to convince voters in Washington state to pass an initiative that would block local governments from imposing taxes on soda, sugary beverages and some food items. The effort follows...
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