Social Media

FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2017, file photo, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks at a news conference in Seattle. Google and Facebook are being ordered by a Washington state judge to pay $455,000 for a campaign finance violation case, Ferguson said Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018. Google will pay $217,000 and Facebook will pay $238,000 in response to two lawsuits filed in June that accused the tech firms of not obeying the state law on political-ad transparency, Ferguson said. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
December 18, 2018 - 7:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Google and Facebook have agreed to pay $455,000 to settle allegations that they failed to keep proper records about who was paying for campaign ads on their sites, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said Tuesday. Google will pay $217,000 and Facebook will pay $238,000 in...
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FILE - In this April 9, 1984 file photo, actress Penny Marshall arrives for the 56th Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles. Marshall died of complications from diabetes on Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, at her Hollywood Hills home. She was 75. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
December 18, 2018 - 7:11 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Celebrities offer their thanks, remembrances and condolences on the death of actress-director Penny Marshall, who died Monday at 75. ___ "I loved Penny. I grew up with her. She was born with a great gift. She was born with a funnybone and the instinct of how to use it. I was very...
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Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, are photographed in Washington, on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. A report compiled by private researchers and released by the Senate intelligence committee Monday says that "active and ongoing" Russian interference operations still exist on social media platforms, and that the Russian operation discovered after the 2016 presidential election was much broader than once thought. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
December 18, 2018 - 6:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — It's a high-stakes game of whack-a-mole with no end in sight. Social media companies are fighting an expensive and increasingly complex battle against Russian trolls who are using catchy memes, bots and fake accounts to influence elections and sow discord in the U.S. and beyond...
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December 18, 2018 - 4:44 am
MOSCOW (AP) — The Kremlin has rejected as baseless reports about a Russian political disinformation campaign on U.S. social media. Reports released by the Senate intelligence committee Monday suggested that Moscow's efforts to help Donald Trump in his 2016 presidential campaign through social media...
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Some of the Facebook and Instagram ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, are photographed in Washington, on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. A report compiled by private researchers and released by the Senate intelligence committee Monday says that "active and ongoing" Russian interference operations still exist on social media platforms, and that the Russian operation discovered after the 2016 presidential election was much broader than once thought. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
December 18, 2018 - 12:40 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's sweeping political disinformation campaign on U.S. social media was more far-reaching than originally thought, with troll farms working to discourage black voters and "blur the lines between reality and fiction" to help elect Donald Trump in 2016, according to reports...
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Former FBI Director James Comey, with his attorney, David Kelley, far right, arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, to testify under subpoena in a second closed-door interview with the GOP-led House Judiciary and Oversight Committees in their probe of conduct by federal law enforcement officials in the investigation of President Donald Trump's alleged Russia ties, and Hillary Clinton's emails. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 17, 2018 - 9:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Director James Comey had harsh words for House Republicans on Monday, saying their silence in response to President Donald Trump's attacks on the Justice Department is "shameful." Comey said Republicans "have to have the courage to stand up and speak the truth, not be...
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December 17, 2018 - 5:41 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — South Africa's former president, who faces corruption charges, has taken to Twitter. "It's me, Jacob Zuma," the ex-leader says in an introductory video posted on the social media site in the last few days. Zuma says "you will get used to me" and that he intends to join the...
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December 16, 2018 - 3:12 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — Facebook has blocked Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's son Yair for 24 hours after he wrote a post criticizing the social media platform as "thought police" and sharing previously banned content. Yair Netanyahu blasted the website on Sunday for removing an earlier post in...
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FILE - In this March 14, 2015, file photo, Pete Davidson speaks at a Comedy Central Roast at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, Calif. New York police were concerned about Davidson after he wrote "I don't want to be on this earth anymore" on Instagram. And they visited the "Saturday Night Live" star Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018, to make sure he was OK. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)
December 16, 2018 - 12:55 am
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City police were concerned about Pete Davidson after he wrote "I don't want to be on this earth anymore" on Instagram. And they visited the "Saturday Night Live" star to make sure he was OK. A police spokesman declined to say where officers met with Ariana Grande's ex-...
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FILE- In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. In itself, Facebook’s latest privacy bug doesn’t sound like a big deal. But it’s part of a pattern for the social media giant that shows just how much data it has on its 2.27 billion users and how often these sorts of slipups happen. The company said Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 that software bug may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than users had granted permission for. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 14, 2018 - 4:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended. The bug disclosed Friday gave hundreds of apps unauthorized access to photos that could in theory...
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