Scientific publishing

FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
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December 01, 2019 - 1:50 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
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FILE- In this March 27, 2019, file photo, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine sit in a cooler at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Research released on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs _ from chickenpox to strep _ that they once could fend off. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
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October 31, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings "immune amnesia." The body can...
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FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 file photo, beds are set up inside a mobile emergency room outside a hospital in Georgia. According to a new study published in the journal Science on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019, a widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 25, 2019 - 5:51 pm
A widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias that leads to blacks getting passed over for special care, according to a new study. The software predicts costs rather than sickness. It is used by U.S. insurers and hospitals to...
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FILE - In this July 7, 2019 file photo, a visitor takes a photo of a crack in the ground following recent earthquakes near Ridgecrest, Calif. Scientists say the earthquakes that hammered the Southern California desert near the town of Ridgecrest last summer involved ruptures on a web of interconnected faults and increased strain on a major nearby fault that has begun to slowly move. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 17, 2019 - 8:02 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The earthquakes that hammered the Southern California desert near the town of Ridgecrest last summer involved ruptures on a web of interconnected faults and increased strain on a major nearby fault that has begun to slowly move, according to a new study. Ruptures in the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, a neighborhood near Addicks Reservoir is flooded by rain from Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston. A new study finds that FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood frequently. Harris County, Texas, where Houston is located, which, according to its flood control district, undergoes a major flood about every two years, has used FEMA’s buyout programs more than any other county, the researchers said. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 09, 2019 - 2:30 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood frequently, a new study finds. The reason is probably that better-off local governments have the resources to apply for...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 19, 2019 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion...
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This undated photo provided by Loren Davis in August 2019 shows an overview of the Cooper's Ferry canyon in western Idaho. In a report released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, scientists say they’ve found artifacts in the area that indicate people were living here around 16,000 years ago, providing new evidence that the first Americans entered their new home by following the Pacific Coast. (Loren Davis via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
August 29, 2019 - 2:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've found artifacts in Idaho that indicate people were living there around 16,000 years ago, providing new evidence that the first Americans entered their new home by following the Pacific Coast. The discovery also points to Japan as a possible origin or influence...
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This undated photo provided by Loren Davis in August 2019 shows an overview of the Cooper's Ferry canyon in western Idaho. In a report released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, scientists say they’ve found artifacts in the area that indicate people were living here around 16,000 years ago, providing new evidence that the first Americans entered their new home by following the Pacific Coast. (Loren Davis via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
August 29, 2019 - 2:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Some artifacts found in western Idaho suggest that people were living there about 16,000 years ago. They provide new evidence that the first Americans arrived by following the Pacific Coast. And they point to Japan as a possible origin or influence for the migration. Scientists...
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This July 13, 2019 photo provided by Guangzhou Wolbaki Biotech shows male Aedes albopictus mosquitoes in a container at the company's lab in Guangzhou, China, prepared for release. Researchers zapped the insects with a small dose of radiation and infected them with a virus-fighting bacterium called Wolbachia. Males and female mosquitoes with different types of Wolbachia won’t have young that survive. So researchers intentionally infect males with a strain not found in the area and then release the insects. (Guangzhou Wolbaki Biotech via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 2:30 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they nearly eliminated disease-carrying mosquitoes on two islands in China using a new technique. The downside: It may not be practical for larger areas and may cost a lot of money. In the experiment, researchers targeted Asian tiger mosquitoes, invasive white-striped...
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This image provided by the University of Tuebingen in Germany shows the Apidima 1 partial cranium fossil, right, with a piece of rock still attached, and its digital reconstruction from a posterior view, middle, and a side view, left. The rounded shape of the Apidima 1 cranium is a unique feature of modern humans and contrasts sharply with Neanderthals and their ancestors. (Katerina Harvati/University of Tuebingen via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 1:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've identified the earliest known sign of our species outside Africa. It's a chunk of skull recovered from a cave in southern Greece. The fossil's estimated age is at least 210,000 years. Researchers said Wednesday that it shows our species began leaving Africa...
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