Scientific publishing

In this March 25, 2020 image taken from video by Caillin Wells, neuroscientist Michael Wells works on the COVID-19 Pandemic Shareable Scientist Response Database in his home in Cambridge, Mass. Michael Wells started the shareable database that has, so far, gathered information from more than 7,000 scientists ready to lend their skills to fighting the coronavirus pandemic. (Caillin Wells via AP)
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March 30, 2020 - 11:18 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Michael Wells was looking for a chance to use his scientific training to help fight the coronavirus when — on the same day the pandemic forced his lab to temporarily close — he decided to create his own opportunity. “CALLING ALL SCIENTISTS," he tweeted on March 18. "Help me in...
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In this Nov. 11, 2016, photo provided by the Museum of Hydrobiological Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a Chinese paddlefish specimen made in 1990 is seen on display at the Museum of Hydrobiological Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Wuhan, China. The Chinese paddlefish's sharp, protruding snout made it one of the largest freshwater species in the world. Since scientists declared it extinct in a research paper published last week, Chinese internet users media outlets have been paying tribute to the hefty creature. (Museum of Hydrobiological Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
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January 10, 2020 - 10:10 am
BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese paddlefish's sharp, protruding snout made it one of the largest freshwater species in the world. Since scientists declared it extinct in a research paper published last week, Chinese internet users and media outlets have been paying tribute to the hefty creature. “It's...
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This image provided by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a collection of lung scans of 20 monkeys who were exposed to tuberculosis after receiving different forms of a TB vaccine. Monkeys in the top row received skin-deep shots, and those in the bottom row were given intravenous injections. The intravenous vaccine protected far better, as shown by TB-caused inflammation seen in red and yellow. (JoAnne Flynn, Alexander White and Pauline Maiello/Pitt; Mario Roederer/NIAID via AP)
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January 01, 2020 - 1:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they’ve figured out how to make a century-old tuberculosis vaccine far more protective: Simply give the shot a different way. In a study with monkeys, injecting the vaccine straight into the bloodstream dramatically improved its effectiveness over today's skin-...
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In this 2019 photo provided by the University of Iowa, Professor Russell Ciochon holds a cast of a Homo erectus skull at his lab in Iowa City. In a report released Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019 by the journal Nature, scientists conclude that remains found in Java, Indonesia are between 108,000 and 117,000 years old. Homo erectus is generally considered an ancestor of our species. (Tim Schoon/University of Iowa via AP)
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December 18, 2019 - 1:19 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they have finally calculated the age of the youngest known remains of Homo erectus, which is generally considered an ancestor of our species. The fossilized skull fragments and other bones were uncovered on the Indonesian island of Java in the 1930s. Determining their...
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This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
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December 14, 2019 - 9:00 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
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December 01, 2019 - 1:50 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
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FILE- In this March 27, 2019, file photo, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine sit in a cooler at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Research released on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs _ from chickenpox to strep _ that they once could fend off. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
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October 31, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings "immune amnesia." The body can...
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FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 file photo, beds are set up inside a mobile emergency room outside a hospital in Georgia. According to a new study published in the journal Science on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019, a widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
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October 25, 2019 - 5:51 pm
A widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias that leads to blacks getting passed over for special care, according to a new study. The software predicts costs rather than sickness. It is used by U.S. insurers and hospitals to...
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FILE - In this July 7, 2019 file photo, a visitor takes a photo of a crack in the ground following recent earthquakes near Ridgecrest, Calif. Scientists say the earthquakes that hammered the Southern California desert near the town of Ridgecrest last summer involved ruptures on a web of interconnected faults and increased strain on a major nearby fault that has begun to slowly move. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
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October 17, 2019 - 8:02 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The earthquakes that hammered the Southern California desert near the town of Ridgecrest last summer involved ruptures on a web of interconnected faults and increased strain on a major nearby fault that has begun to slowly move, according to a new study. Ruptures in the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, a neighborhood near Addicks Reservoir is flooded by rain from Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston. A new study finds that FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood frequently. Harris County, Texas, where Houston is located, which, according to its flood control district, undergoes a major flood about every two years, has used FEMA’s buyout programs more than any other county, the researchers said. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
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October 09, 2019 - 2:30 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood frequently, a new study finds. The reason is probably that better-off local governments have the resources to apply for...
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