Science

FILE - In this June 7, 2014, file photo, Odessa High School graduates pose for a group portrait prior to the start of the commencement ceremony in Odessa, Texas. Lower-performing students are doing worse in math and reading, dragging down overall results on the Nation’s Report Card. American fourth graders overall posted a slight decline in8 math and a slight gain in reading, while eighth graders saw results fall in both reading and math. That’s according to results released Wednesday on the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress, a nationwide test. (Edyta Blaszczyk/Odessa American via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 30, 2019 - 6:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The latest Nation's Report Card is painting a dismal picture of math and reading achievement among American fourth and eighth graders despite a few bright spots. Students in the nation's capital, which faced multiple scandals in its public school system last year, made significant...
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FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 29, 2018 file photo, beds are set up inside a mobile emergency room outside a hospital in Georgia. According to a new study published in the journal Science on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019, a widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
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October 25, 2019 - 5:51 pm
A widely used software program that helps guide care for millions of patients is flawed by unintentional racial bias that leads to blacks getting passed over for special care, according to a new study. The software predicts costs rather than sickness. It is used by U.S. insurers and hospitals to...
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October 24, 2019 - 9:24 am
MILAN (AP) — The U.S. ambassador to Italy has returned to Italian officials the head of a statue stolen from an archaeological site in Rome more than 50 years ago. Ambassador Lewis Eisenberg handed over the marble head of the mythical figure Pan to Culture Minister Dario Franceschini Thursday on...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2018 file photo, Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019, is a surprise because the company earlier this year stopped two studies of the drug, called aducanumab, after partial results suggested it was not working. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
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October 22, 2019 - 6:44 pm
Biogen Inc. said Tuesday it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia. The announcement was a surprise because the drug company earlier this year stopped two...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 21, 2019 - 11:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The paralysis is very rare. U.S. health officials have confirmed 590 cases over the past five years. Finding the cause...
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This undated photo provided by Harvard University shows Michael Kremer, professor of economics at the college in Cambridge, Mass., who was awarded 2019 Nobel Prize in economics along with Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, for pioneering new ways to alleviate global poverty. (Jon Chase/Harvard University News Office via AP)
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October 14, 2019 - 8:36 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in economics (all times local): 1 a.m. Tuesday Michael Kremer was worried the Skype message was a scam. It appeared to be from a friend in Sweden and said the person needed to speak with the Harvard economist "urgently." That's when Kremer realized he'...
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A view of a well-preserved fresco depicting fighting gladiators in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii, Italy, recently unearthed by archeologists. The new discovery -- located in the Regio V site, north of the archaeological park -- was unveiled on Friday and it's not open to the public yet. (Archeological Park of Pompeii via AP)
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October 11, 2019 - 2:36 pm
ROME (AP) — Archeologists excavating what may have been an ancient Roman drinking den in the ruined city of Pompeii said Friday they have unearthed a well-preserved wall painting of gladiators in action, complete with realistically gory wounds. The 3ft by 4.5ft fresco is located in the Regio V site...
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In this photo provided by the Museum of the Bible, a photo of the Lunar Bible on display at the museum is pictured in an undated photo. The Museum of the Bible in Washington has quietly replaced an artifact purported to be one of a handful of miniature Bibles that a NASA astronaut carried to the moon in 1971 after an expert questioned its authenticity. (Museum of the Bible Collection via AP)
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October 05, 2019 - 10:14 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Museum of the Bible in Washington quietly replaced an artifact purported to be one of a handful of miniature Bibles that a NASA astronaut carried to the moon in 1971 after an expert questioned its authenticity. The move follows an announcement last year that at least five...
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People visit a memorial garden for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019, in Las Vegas. Two years after a shooter rained gunfire on country music fans from a high-rise Las Vegas hotel, MGM Resorts International reached a settlement that could pay up to $800 million to families of the 58 people who died and hundreds of others who were injured, attorneys said Thursday. (AP Photo/John Locher)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 04, 2019 - 10:45 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — They may have been united by a love for country music, but the people gunned down two years ago at a Las Vegas concert will not be seen as equals when up to $800 million is paid out from a legal settlement. The administrator overseeing the process will have the icy task of...
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In this Sept. 26, 2019, photo, cars pass Rockefeller University in New York. Prestigious universities around the world, including Rockefeller, have accepted at least $60 million over the past five years from the family that owns the maker of OxyContin, even as the company became embroiled in lawsuits related to the opioid epidemic, financial records show. Rockefeller accepted more money from the Sacklers than any other school in recent history. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 03, 2019 - 4:06 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Prestigious universities around the world have accepted at least $60 million over the past five years from the family that owns the maker of OxyContin, even as the company became embroiled in lawsuits related to the opioid epidemic, financial records show. Some of the donations...
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