Salmon

FILE - In this July 13, 2007, file photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. A proposed gold and copper mine at the headwaters of the world's largest sockeye salmon fishery in Alaska would cause "unavoidable adverse impacts," the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in a letter to the developer released Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. The corps is asking the backers of Pebble Mine to come up with a mitigation plan within 90 days for nearly 3,000 acres of land and nearly 200 miles of streams it says could be affected if the controversial mine moves forward. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
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August 24, 2020 - 3:55 pm
ANCHORAGE, ALASKA (AP) — A proposed gold and copper mine at the headwaters of the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery in Alaska would cause “unavoidable adverse impacts,” the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in a letter to the developer released Monday. The corps is giving Pebble Limited...
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August 22, 2020 - 7:52 pm
The Trump administration plans to block a proposed copper and gold mine near the headwaters of a major U.S. salmon fishery in Alaska, six people described as familiar with its plans told Politico on Saturday. The administration's rejection of the Pebble Mine project is expected to come after Trump...
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FILE - In this April 24, 2008, file photo, a sea lion eats a salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam in North Bonneville, Wash. Federal authorities on Friday, Aug. 14, 2020, granted permission for Washington state, Oregon and several Native American tribes to begin killing hundreds of salmon-hungry sea lions in the Columbia River and its tributaries over the next five years. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
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August 14, 2020 - 5:05 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — U.S. authorities on Friday gave wildlife managers in Washington, Oregon and Idaho permission to start killing hundreds of sea lions in the Columbia River basin in hopes of helping struggling salmon and steelhead trout. The bulky marine mammals long ago figured out that they could...
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In this May 15, 2019, file photo, the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River is seen from the air near Colfax, Washington. The federal government said Friday, July 31, 2020, four giant dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
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July 31, 2020 - 3:17 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The U.S. government announced Friday that four huge dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. The decision thwarts the desires of environmental groups that fought for two decades to breach the structures...
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This photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows an Arctic grayling captured in a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fish trap at Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge near Lima, Montana. U.S. wildlife officials have rejected federal protections for the rare, freshwater fish species at the center of a long-running legal dispute. The decision, on Wednesday, July 22, 2020, comes almost two years after a federal appeals court faulted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for dismissing the threat that climate change and other pressures pose to Arctic grayling. (Jim Mogen/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
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July 22, 2020 - 7:14 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials on Wednesday rejected special protections for a rare, freshwater fish related to salmon that's been at the center of a long-running legal dispute, citing conservation efforts that officials say have increased Arctic grayling numbers in a Montana river...
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FILE - This March 3, 2020, file photo shows the Iron Gate Dam, powerhouse and spillway are on the lower Klamath River near Hornbrook, Calif. Federal regulators on Thursday, July 16, 2020, threw a significant curveball at a coalition that has been planning for years to demolish four massive hydroelectric dams on a river along the Oregon-California border to save salmon. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)
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July 16, 2020 - 6:52 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Federal regulators on Thursday threw a significant curveball at a coalition that has been planning for years to demolish four massive hydroelectric dams on a river along the Oregon-California border to save salmon populations that have dwindled to almost nothing. The deal,...
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FILE - In this April 11, 2018 file photo, water moves through a spillway of the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River near Almota, Wash. Farmers, environmentalists, tribal leaders and public utility officials are eagerly awaiting a federal report due Friday, Feb. 28, 2020, that could decide the fate of four hydroelectric dams on the Snake River. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios,File)
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February 28, 2020 - 7:49 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A long-awaited federal report out Friday rejected the idea of removing four hydroelectric dams on a major Pacific Northwest river in a last-ditch effort tosave threatened and endangered salmon, saying such a dramatic approach would destabilize the power grid, increase overall...
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JoDe Goudy, chairman of the Yakama Nation, speaks with the Columbia River in the background near The Dalles, Oregon, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, where Celilo Falls, an ancient salmon fishing site was destroyed by the construction of the Dalles Dam in the 1950s. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
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October 14, 2019 - 9:22 pm
THE DALLES, Ore. (AP) — Two Pacific Northwest tribes on Monday demanded the removal of three major hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River to save migrating salmon and starving orcas and restore fishing sites that were guaranteed to the tribes in a treaty more than 150 years ago. The Yakama and...
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File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
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September 05, 2019 - 5:48 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists said Thursday they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast, a development that could badly disrupt marine life including salmon, whales and sea lions. The expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, researchers with the...
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File - In this May 4, 2010, file photo, a sea lion tosses a partially eaten salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam, where six more sea lions were trapped earlier in the day with one to be euthanized, in North Bonneville, Wash. More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually in a nearly 300-mile stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead. The National Marine Fisheries Service said Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, it's taking public comments on the plan requested by Idaho, Oregon, Washington and tribes in those states. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
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August 30, 2019 - 5:32 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually along a stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead, federal officials said Friday. The National Marine Fisheries Service said it's taking public comments...
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