Rising sea levels

In this image made from video, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres addresses the Pacific Islands Forum, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Suva, Fiji. Guterres says he’s traveling to three South Pacific island nations to see the effects of climate change firsthand. Speaking in Fiji at a meeting with officials from the Pacific Islands Forum, the U.N. leader says he wants to learn about the work being undertaken by island communities to bolster resilience. (Fiji Broadcasting via AP)
May 15, 2019 - 4:10 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said Wednesday that he's traveling to three South Pacific island nations to see the effects of climate change firsthand. Speaking in Fiji, the U.N. leader said he wanted to learn about the work being undertaken by island...
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In this Aug. 23, 2018 file photo, people stand near flood waters from Hurricane Lane in Hilo, Hawaii. Some of Hawaii's most iconic beaches could soon be underwater as rising sea levels caused by global warming overtake its white sand beaches and bustling city streets. That’s alarming for a state where beach tourism is the primary economic driver. (Hollyn Johnson/Hawaii Tribune-Herald via AP, File)
April 21, 2019 - 11:45 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii's iconic Waikiki Beach could soon be underwater as rising sea levels caused by global warming overtake its white sand beaches and bustling city streets. That's alarming for a state where beach tourism is the primary economic driver. So state lawmakers are trying to pass...
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This 2016 photo provided by NASA shows patches of bare land at the Jakobshavn glacier in Greenland. The major Greenland glacier that was one of the fastest shrinking ice and snow masses on Earth is growing again, a new NASA study finds. The Jakobshavn glacier around 2012 was retreating about 1.8 miles (3 kilometers) and thinning nearly 130 feet (almost 40 meters) annually. But the last two years it started growing again at about the same rate, according to a study released on Monday, March 25, 2019, in Nature Geoscience. Study authors and outside scientists think this is temporary. (NASA via AP)
March 25, 2019 - 1:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A major Greenland glacier that was one of the fastest shrinking ice and snow masses on Earth is growing again, a new NASA study finds. The Jakobshavn (YA-cob-shawv-en) glacier around 2012 was retreating about 1.8 miles (3 kilometers) and thinning nearly 130 feet (almost 40 meters...
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February 20, 2019 - 5:47 am
NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — A prominent American economist says there are "very few" individuals left who still doubt climate change because the evidence of its impact is clear. Columbia University Professor Jeffrey Sachs told the Associated Press Wednesday that public discourse has moved beyond whether...
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Visitors to the U.N. climate conference watch a speech by Arnold Schwarzenegger, in Katowice, Poland, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. The COP24 UN Climate Change Conference is taking place in Katowice, Poland. Negotiators from around the world are meeting for talks on curbing climate change. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
December 03, 2018 - 6:04 pm
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — As leaders attending the U.N.'s annual climate summit heard fresh warnings about the dire consequences of leaving global warming unchecked, a new issue emerged Monday as a pressing concern: how to persuade millions of workers their industry can't have a future if humanity is...
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This Jan. 6, 2010 photo provided by CNRS-UBO-IUEM Geosciences Ocean, shows a fin whale, foreground, and tabular drifting iceberg near Antarctica. Climate Change is more than rising thermometers, wildfires, droughts and storms; it even has a hand in altering whale songs, flowering plants and civil war. Near Antarctica, whales are singing in deeper tones to cut through the noise of melting icebergs. (Jean-Yves Royer/CNRS-UBO-IUEM Geosciences Ocean via AP)
December 01, 2018 - 9:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Near Antarctica, whales are singing in deeper tones to cut through the noise of melting icebergs. In California, a big college football rivalry game was postponed until Saturday because of smoky air from wildfires. And Alaskan shellfish were struck by an outbreak of warm water...
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The United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket with the NASA Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) onboard is seen shortly after the mobile service tower at SLC-2 was rolled back, Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The ICESat-2 mission will measure the changing height of Earth's ice. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
September 15, 2018 - 12:13 pm
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AP) — A NASA satellite designed to precisely measure changes in Earth's ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice and vegetation was launched into polar orbit from California early Saturday. A Delta 2 rocket carrying ICESat-2 lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 6:02...
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This satellite image provided by NOAA shows Hurricane Florence on the eastern coast of the United States on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (NOAA via AP)
September 14, 2018 - 2:19 pm
MIAMI (AP) — It's about the water, not the wind, with Hurricane Florence making an extended stay along the North Carolina coast. Forecasters say "it cannot be emphasized enough that the most serious hazard associated with slow-moving Florence is extremely heavy rainfall, which will cause disastrous...
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FILE - This March 9, 2010, file photo shows a tanker truck passing the Chevron oil refinery in Richmond, Calif. A U.S. judge who held a hearing about climate change that received widespread attention has thrown out the underlying lawsuits that sought to hold big oil companies liable for the role of fossil fuels in the Earth's warming environment. Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said Monday, June 25, 2018, that Congress and the president, not a federal judge, were best suited to address fossil fuels' contribution to global warming. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
June 25, 2018 - 10:25 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A U.S. judge who held a hearing about climate change that received widespread attention ruled Monday that Congress and the president were best suited to address the contribution of fossil fuels to global warming, throwing out lawsuits that sought to hold big oil companies...
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