Right to privacy

Shankar Narayan, legislative director of the ACLU of Washington, left, speaks at a news conference outside Amazon headquarters, Monday, June 18, 2018, in Seattle. Representatives of community-based organizations urged Amazon to stop selling its face surveillance system, Rekognition, to the government. They later delivered the petitions to Amazon. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
June 18, 2018 - 6:05 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Some Amazon company investors said Monday they are siding with privacy and civil rights advocates who are urging the tech giant to not sell a powerful face recognition tool to police. The American Civil Liberties Union is leading the effort against Amazon's Rekognition product,...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle. While the Seattle Police Department bars officers from using real-time facial recognition in body camera video, privacy activists are concerned that a proliferation of the technology could turn the cameras into tools of mass surveillance. The ACLU and other organizations on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, asked Amazon to stop selling its facial-recognition tool, called Rekognition, to law enforcement agencies. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 22, 2018 - 6:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon's decision to market a powerful face recognition tool to police is alarming privacy advocates, who say the tech giant's reach could vastly accelerate a dystopian future in which camera-equipped officers can identify and track people in real time, whether they're involved in...
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