Right to privacy

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2016, file photo, a portion of the website for the website fara.gov, on the Foreign Agents Registration Act, is seen photographed in Washington. A push to give the Justice Department more enforcement authority over the lucrative and at times shadowy world of foreign lobbying is stalled amid opposition from pro-business groups, nonprofits and privacy advocates. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)
October 09, 2018 - 11:44 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A push to give the Justice Department more enforcement authority over the lucrative and at times shadowy world of foreign lobbying is stalled amid opposition from pro-business groups, nonprofits and privacy advocates. Organizations that range from the influential U.S. Chamber of...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018, file photo, Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., speaks with reporters after the Republican's policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration is hoping Congress can come up with a new set of national rules governing how companies can use consumers' data that finds a balance between "privacy and prosperity." "Consumers deserve clear answers and standards on data privacy protection," Thune, who heads the Commerce panel, said in a statement. By hearing from the companies, lawmakers will be able to assess "what Congress can do to promote clear privacy expectations without hurting innovation," he said. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
September 26, 2018 - 1:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress wants to pass national rules governing how companies can use consumers' data — though a major goal might simply be to block states from enacting stronger privacy protections on their own. It will be tricky to reconcile the concerns of privacy advocates who want people to...
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June 29, 2018 - 1:56 pm
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The Iowa Supreme Court on Friday struck down a law requiring a 72-hour waiting period for women seeking an abortion, ruling that the restriction was unconstitutional and that "autonomy and dominion over one's body go to the very heart of what it means to be free." Justices...
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FILE - In this July 12, 2017 file photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facial recognition device is ready to scan another passenger at a United Airlines gate at George Bush Intercontinental Airport, in Houston. Florida’s busiest airport is becoming the first in the nation to require a face scan of passengers on all arriving and departing international flights, including U.S. citizens, according to officials there. The expected announcement Thursday, June 21, 2018, at Orlando International Airport alarms some privacy advocates who say there are no formal rules in place for handling data gleaned from the scans, nor formal guidelines on what should happen if a passenger is wrongly prevented from boarding. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
June 21, 2018 - 8:29 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Florida's busiest airport is becoming the first in the nation to require a face scan of passengers on all arriving and departing international flights, including U.S. citizens, according to officials there. The expected announcement Thursday at Orlando International Airport...
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Shankar Narayan, legislative director of the ACLU of Washington, left, speaks at a news conference outside Amazon headquarters, Monday, June 18, 2018, in Seattle. Representatives of community-based organizations urged Amazon to stop selling its face surveillance system, Rekognition, to the government. They later delivered the petitions to Amazon. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
June 18, 2018 - 6:05 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Some Amazon company investors said Monday they are siding with privacy and civil rights advocates who are urging the tech giant to not sell a powerful face recognition tool to police. The American Civil Liberties Union is leading the effort against Amazon's Rekognition product,...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle. While the Seattle Police Department bars officers from using real-time facial recognition in body camera video, privacy activists are concerned that a proliferation of the technology could turn the cameras into tools of mass surveillance. The ACLU and other organizations on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, asked Amazon to stop selling its facial-recognition tool, called Rekognition, to law enforcement agencies. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 22, 2018 - 6:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon's decision to market a powerful face recognition tool to police is alarming privacy advocates, who say the tech giant's reach could vastly accelerate a dystopian future in which camera-equipped officers can identify and track people in real time, whether they're involved in...
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