Right to privacy

FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2015, file photo, a pedestrian crossing from Mexico into the United States at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry has his facial features and eyes scanned at a biometric kiosk in San Diego. The Trump administration says it's planning to expand the collection of biometric information as part of immigration enforcement. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 01, 2020 - 8:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration announced plans Tuesday to expand the collection of personal “biometric” information by the agency in charge of immigration enforcement, raising concerns about civil liberties and data protection. In a statement, the Department of Homeland Security said it...
Read More
1010 WINS Newsroom
July 28, 2020 - 1:52 pm
ISTANBUL (AP) — Turkish lawmakers were making their final speeches Tuesday before voting on a bill that would give the government greater powers to regulate social media, in what human rights groups and the opposition have decried as a violation of free expression online. The new legislation would...
Read More
This aerial drone photo shows the Call Federal Credit Union building, front, Tuesday June 16, 2020, in Midlothian, Va. Police were able to obtain geofence search warrants, a tool being increasingly used by law enforcement. The warrant sought location histories kept by Google of cellphones and other devices used within 150 meters (500 feet) of the bank. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
1010 WINS Newsroom
July 03, 2020 - 12:17 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — It was a terrifying bank robbery: Demanding cash in a handwritten note, a man waved a gun, threatened to kill a teller's family, ordered employees and customers onto the floor and escaped with $195,000. Surveillance video gave authorities a lead, showing a man holding a...
Read More
A soldier of the Swiss army wearing a protective face mask holds a smartphone with an app using Decentralized Privacy-Preserving Proximity Tracing (DP-3T) during a test with 100 soldiers in the military compound of Chamblon near Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland, Thursday, April 30, 2020. The race by governments to develop mobile tracing apps in order to contain infections after lockdowns ease is focusing attention on privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, where academics and civil liberties activists are pushing for solutions that protect personal data. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 04, 2020 - 7:28 am
LONDON (AP) — Goodbye lockdown, hello smartphone. As governments race to develop mobile tracing apps to help contain infections, attention is turning to how officials will ensure users’ privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, which has been one of the hardest-hit regions in the world,...
Read More
A woman covers her face as she shops at a food market in Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, March 15, 2020. ‏Israel has imposed a number of tough restrictions to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that schools, universities, restaurants and places of entertainment will be closed to stop the spread of the coronavirus. He also encouraged people not to go to their workplaces unless absolutely necessary. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 15, 2020 - 6:44 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel has long been known for its use of technology to track the movements of Palestinian militants. Now, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wants to use similar technology to stop the movement of the coronavirus. Netanyahu’s Cabinet on Sunday authorized the Shin Bet security...
Read More
President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally Monday, Feb. 10, 2020, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
1010 WINS Newsroom
February 11, 2020 - 12:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — After the Parkland school shooting in Florida two years ago, President Donald Trump chided Republican lawmakers for being too “scared” of the National Rifle Association to tighten gun laws — then backed away from the idea. After back-to-back mass shootings in Ohio and Texas in...
Read More
FILE- This July 16, 2013, file photo, shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Adam Pezen, Carlo Licata and Nimesh Patel are among the billions of Facebook users who use the site to keep up with friends. And like millions of others, the three men shared their own photographs and were "tagged" in other snapshots posted by friends, sometimes at the urging of the site's suggested tag feature.   But their Illinois addresses put the trio's names atop a lawsuit against Facebook and led to a landmark $550 million settlement last month. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
February 09, 2020 - 10:54 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Adam Pezen, Carlo Licata and Nimesh Patel are among millions of people who have been tagged in Facebook photos at some point in the past decade, sometimes at the suggestion of an automated tagging feature powered by facial recognition technology. It was their Illinois addresses,...
Read More
FILE - In this file photo dated Wednesday, March 28, 2012, a security cctv camera is seen by the Olympic Stadium at the Olympic Park in London. The South Wales police deployed facial recognition surveillance equipment on Sunday Jan. 12, 2020, in a test to monitor crowds arriving for a weekend soccer match in real-time, that is prompting public debate about possible aggressive uses of facial recognition in Western democracies, raising questions about human rights and how the technology may enter people's daily lives in the future. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, FILE)
1010 WINS Newsroom
January 24, 2020 - 12:08 pm
LONDON (AP) — London police will start using facial recognition cameras to pick out suspects from street crowds in real time, in a major advance for the controversial technology that raises worries about automated surveillance and erosion of privacy rights. The Metropolitan Police Service said...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2019, file photo California Attorney General Xavier Becerra gestures while speaking at a media conference in San Francisco. Forty million Californians will shortly obtain sweeping digital privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. “If we do this right in California," says Becerra, the state will "put the capital P back into privacy for all Americans.” (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
December 29, 2019 - 11:15 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Forty million Californians will soon have sweeping digital-privacy rights stronger than any seen before in the U.S., posing a significant challenge to Big Tech and the data economy it helped create. So long as state residents don't mind shouldering much of the burden of...
Read More
1010 WINS Newsroom
December 19, 2019 - 3:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A study by a U.S. agency has found that facial recognition technology often performs unevenly based on a person's race, gender or age. This is the first time the National Institute of Standards and Technology has investigated demographic differences in how face-scanning algorithms...
Read More

Pages