Rebellions and uprisings

A soldier and members of the Algerian Republican Guard, guard the remains of 24 Algerians at the Moufdi-Zakaria culture palace in Algiers, Friday, July, 3, 2020. After decades in a French museum, the skulls of 24 Algerians decapitated for resisting French colonial forces were formally repatriated to Algeria in an elaborate ceremony led by the teary-eyed Algerian president. The return of the skulls was the result of years of efforts by Algerian historians, and comes amid a growing global reckoning with the legacy of colonialism. (AP Photo/Toufik Doudou)
1010 WINS Newsroom
July 05, 2020 - 8:04 am
ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — After decades in a French museum, the skulls of 24 Algerians decapitated for resisting French colonial forces were formally repatriated to Algeria on Friday in an elaborate ceremony led by the teary-eyed Algerian president. A 21-gun salute thundered from Algiers’...
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In this image taken from OBN video, the coffin carrying Ethiopia singer Hachalu Hundessa is lowered into the ground during the funeral in Ambo, Ethiopia, Thursday July 2, 2020. More than 80 people have been killed in unrest in Ethiopia after the popular singer Hachalu Hundessa was shot dead this week. He was buried Thursday amid tight security. He had been a prominent voice in anti-government protests that led to a change in leadership in 2018. (OBN via AP)
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July 03, 2020 - 2:39 pm
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — Ethiopia’s prime minister on Friday said dissidents he recently extended an offer of peace have “taken up arms” in revolt against the government in a week of deadly unrest that followed the killing of a popular singer. Those who participate “in the destruction of the...
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FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2018, file photo, pro-democracy activist Nathan Law, along with Agnes Chow and Joshua Wong, attends a press conference in Hong Kong. Prominent Hong Kong democracy activist Nathan Law has left the city for an undisclosed location, he revealed on his Facebook page shortly after testifying at a U.S. congressional hearing about the tough national security law China had imposed on the semi-autonomous territory. In his post late Thursday, July 2, 2020, he said that he decided to take on the responsibility for advocating for Hong Kong internationally and had since left the city. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)
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July 03, 2020 - 7:59 am
HONG KONG (AP) — Prominent Hong Kong democracy activist Nathan Law has left the city for an undisclosed location after testifying in a U.S. congressional hearing about a tough new security law imposed by mainland China on the semi-autonomous territory. Law, who declined to disclose his whereabouts...
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Relatives comfort the grieving daughter of civilian Bashir Ahmed Khan at their residence on the outskirts of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. Suspected rebels attacked paramilitary soldiers in the Indian portion of Kashmir, killing Khan and a paramilitary soldier, according to government sources. The family refutes the claim. (AP Photo/ Dar Yasin)
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July 02, 2020 - 9:39 am
SRINAGAR, India (AP) — A photo of a toddler sitting on the chest of of his dead grandfather has outraged residents of Indian-controlled Kashmir after the victim’s family accused government forces of shooting the 65-year-old man during a clash with rebels in the disputed region. Suhail Ahmed, the...
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A rainbow light display illuminates the night sky in the West Village near The Stonewall Inn, birthplace of the gay rights movement, Saturday, June 27, 2020, in New York. The light installation was presented by Kind snack foods to mark what would have been the 50th anniversary of the NYC Pride March, which is canceled this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
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June 28, 2020 - 10:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — There were protests, rainbow flags and performances — it was LGBTQ Pride, after all. But what was normally an outpouring on the streets of New York City looked a little different this year, thanks to social distancing rules required by the coronavirus. With the city’s massive Pride...
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FILE - In this June 30, 2019, file photo, marchers participate in the Queer Liberation March in New York. This year's Pride events were supposed to be a blowout as LGBTQ people the world over marked the 50th anniversary of the first parade to celebrate what were then the initial small steps in their ability to live openly, and to advocate for bigger victories. Now, Pride is largely taking a backseat, having been driven to the internet by the coronavirus pandemic and now by calls for racial equality that were renewed by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis at the hands of police. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
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June 25, 2020 - 9:37 am
SCRANTON, Pa. (AP) — LGBTQ Pride is turning 50 this year a little short on its signature fanfare, after the coronavirus pandemic drove it to the internet and after calls for racial equality sparked by the killing of George Floyd further overtook it. Activists and organizers are using the...
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This Nov. 5, 2009 file photo shows the entrance to Fort Hood Army Base in Fort Hood, Texas, near Killeen, Texas. As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren't even considered good generals. Or even good men. The 10 generals include some who made costly battlefield blunders; others mistreated captured Union soldiers, some were slaveholders, and one was linked to the Ku Klux Klan after the war. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett, File)
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June 14, 2020 - 8:53 am
CINCINNATI (AP) — As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren’t even considered good...
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This Nov. 23, 2019 photo shows Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter Alexis Johnson in Pittsburgh. When the Pittsburgh Post Gazette pulled her off coverage of protests triggered by George Floyd's death, nobody anticipated it would lead to a staff revolt and become a national story, part of an extraordinary week where the news media's sluggishness in promoting diversity became part of the national conversation.(Shantale Davis/@ShanShoots2 via AP)
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June 10, 2020 - 8:52 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Alexis Johnson figures she wasn't the loser when the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette said she couldn't cover protests triggered by George Floyd's death. Her readers were — denied the perspective of a black woman with family roots in law enforcement working in her hometown. Nobody...
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FILE - In this June 16, 2019, file photo, protesters march on the streets against an extradition bill in Hong Kong. As 2019 drew to a close it seemed to do so in a blanket haze of tear gas as protesters and security forces faced off in almost every corner of the world. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)
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June 10, 2020 - 1:01 am
LONDON (AP) — The protests that left much of the world in a haze of tear gas last year were slowed by a pandemic – until the death of George Floyd sparked a global uprising against police brutality and racial inequality. From Hong Kong to Khartoum, Baghdad to Beirut, Gaza to Paris and Caracas to...
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FILE - This Aug. 16, 2017, file photo shows James Bennet, editorial page editor of The New York Times, in New York. Bennet has resigned amid outrage over an op-ed by a Republican senator who advocated using federal troops to quell protests, outrage that only grew when it was revealed the editor had not read the piece before publication, the paper announced Sunday, June 7, 2020. (AP Photo/Larry Neumeister, File)
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June 07, 2020 - 7:25 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Times’ editorial page editor resigned Sunday after the newspaper disowned an opinion piece by U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton that advocated using federal troops to quell unrest, and it was later revealed he hadn't read the piece prior to publication. James Bennet resigned and his...
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