Plants

Flames climb trees as the Camp Fire tears through Paradise, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
November 13, 2018 - 12:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Both nature and humans share blame for California's devastating wildfires, but forest management did not play a major role, despite President Donald Trump's claims, fire scientists say. Nature provides the dangerous winds that have whipped the fires, and human-caused climate...
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Workers prepare to raise the 2018 Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, a 72-foot tall, 12-ton Norway Spruce from Wallkill, N.Y., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, in New York. The 86th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting ceremoN.Y. will take place on Wednesday, Nov. 28. (Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer)
November 10, 2018 - 5:22 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is in place and will soon be strung with 50,000 LED lights as one of New York City's star holiday attractions — the gift of a same-sex married couple. The 72-foot-tall, 12-ton Norway spruce arrived on a flatbed trailer Saturday morning and was...
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The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is hoisted by crane to a flatbed truck, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2018 in Wallkill, N.Y. It will be transported to Manhattan where it will be erected at Rockefeller Center this weekend. The 72-foot-tall (22-meter) Norway spruce will be lit in a televised ceremony on Nov. 28 and remain on display until Jan 7. (Patrick Oehler/Poughkeepsie Journal via AP)
November 08, 2018 - 4:53 pm
WALLKILL, N.Y. (AP) — The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has been cut down in upstate New York and is being readied for transport to Manhattan where it will be erected this weekend. Rockefeller Center's publicist says the 72-foot-tall (22-meter) Norway spruce was cut down Thursday morning at the...
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In this image made from video and provided by SevereStudios.com, damage from Hurricane Michael is seen in Mexico Beach, Fla. on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018. Search-and-rescue teams fanned out across the Florida Panhandle to reach trapped people in Michael's wake Thursday as daylight yielded scenes of rows upon rows of houses smashed to pieces by the third-most powerful hurricane on record to hit the continental U.S. (SevereStudios.com via AP)
October 11, 2018 - 8:19 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — The devastation inflicted by Hurricane Michael came into focus Thursday with rows upon rows of homes found smashed to pieces, and rescue crews struggling to enter stricken areas in hopes of accounting for hundreds of people who may have stayed behind. At least three deaths...
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The Oceanis is grounded by a tidal surge at the Port St. Joe Marina, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018 in Port St. Joe, Fla. Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods. (Douglas R. Clifford/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
October 10, 2018 - 10:54 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods before continuing its destructive charge inland across the Southeast. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the continental U...
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Plaintiff DeWayne Johnson, a school groundskeeper who says Roundup weed-killer caused his cancer, leaves a courtroom in San Francisco, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. A San Francisco judge said in a tentative ruling Wednesday that she would order a new trial in a $289 million judgment against agribusiness giant Monsanto brought by Johnson. (AP Photo/Paul Elias)
October 10, 2018 - 10:25 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A San Francisco judge said Wednesday she is considering tossing out the lion's share of the $289 million judgment against agribusiness giant Monsanto and ordering a new trial over whether the company's weed-killer caused a groundskeeper's cancer. San Francisco Superior Court...
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The Oceanis is grounded by a tidal surge at the Port St. Joe Marina, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018 in Port St. Joe, Fla. Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods. (Douglas R. Clifford/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
October 10, 2018 - 7:28 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Powerful Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods before continuing its destructive march inland across the Southeast. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the...
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In this image made from video, a Miami-Dade police officer is seen wearing a gas mask and riding an ATV in Miami Beach, Fla., on Thursday. Oct. 4, 2018. Many of Florida's beaches are empty because of a red tide outbreak on both the Gulf and Atlantic coasts. While the Gulf Coast has been plagued with the toxic algae outbreak all summer, it only just showed up in Miami this week. (AP Photo/Josh Replogle)
October 04, 2018 - 5:00 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Many of Florida's famous beaches were empty Thursday because of a red tide outbreak that for the first time in decades is plaguing both the Gulf and Atlantic coasts at once. While the Gulf Coast has suffered the brunt of the toxic algae outbreak all summer, it only just showed up this...
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In this Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018 photo, workers finish exhibits at the Cannabition cannabis museum in Las Vegas. The museum celebrating all things cannabis with displays that include a glass bong taller than a giraffe and huggable faux marijuana buds is the newest tourist attraction in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
September 20, 2018 - 3:17 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A glass bong taller than a giraffe. Huggable faux marijuana buds. A pool full of foam weed nuggets. Las Vegas' newest attraction — and Instagram backdrop — is a museum celebrating all things cannabis. Nobody will be allowed to light up at Cannabition when it opens Thursday because...
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FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States and Canada from 1987 to 2006. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
September 20, 2018 - 1:06 am
OXFORD, Pa. (AP) — A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried. Pesky mosquitoes, disease-carrying ticks, crop-munching aphids and cockroaches are doing just fine. But the more beneficial flying insects of summer — native bees, moths,...
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