Pig and hog markets

In this Friday, April 17, 2020, photo, Chris Petersen looks at a Berkshire hog in a pen on his farm near Clear Lake, Iowa. COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has created problems for all meat producers, but pork farmers have been hit especially hard. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
1010 WINS Newsroom
April 21, 2020 - 8:30 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — After enduring extended trade disputes and worker shortages, U.S. hog farmers were poised to finally hit it big this year with expectations of climbing prices amid soaring domestic and foreign demand. Instead, restaurant closures due to the coronavirus have contributed to an...
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Amid concerns of the spread of COVID-19, Belia Alvarado wipes the meat counter display at El Rancho grocery store in Dallas, Monday, April 13, 2020. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
1010 WINS Newsroom
April 13, 2020 - 7:13 pm
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Some massive meat processing plants have closed at least temporarily because their workers were sickened by the new coronavirus, raising concerns that there could soon be shortages of beef, pork and poultry in supermarkets. The meat supply chain is especially vulnerable since...
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FILE - In this May 14, 2019, fiel photo, containers are piled up at a port in Qingdao in east China's Shandong province. China’s economic growth slowed to a 26-year low in the latest quarter as a tariff war with Washington weighed on exports and auto sales and other domestic activity weakened. The world’s second-largest economy expanded by 6.2 percent in the three months ending in September, down from the previous quarter’s 6 percent, data showed Friday, Oct. 18, 2019. (Chinatopix via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 18, 2019 - 7:05 am
BEIJING (AP) — China's economic growth sank to a new multi-decade low in the latest quarter as a trade war with Washington deepened a slump that is weighing on the global economy. Growth in the world's second-largest economy slipped to 6% in the three months ending in September, down from the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, file photo, a clerk stacks cuts of pork at a meat market in Beijing. China is releasing pork from stockpiles for the second time this month to help cool surging prices ahead of next week’s celebration of the Communist Party's 70th anniversary in power. (AP Photo/Fu Ting, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 26, 2019 - 2:05 am
BEIJING (AP) — China's government is releasing more pork from stockpiles to help cool surging prices ahead of celebrations of the Communist Party's 70th anniversary in power. The government said Thursday it will auction off 10,000 tons of pork, the country's staple meat. It was the second release...
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In this Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, photo, a butcher slices cuts of pork at a meat market in Beijing. China's government said Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, that is releasing pork from official stockpiles to ease a shortage and cool surging prices ahead of Oct. 1 celebrations of the Communist Party's 70th anniversary in power. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 18, 2019 - 2:29 am
BEIJING (AP) — China's government is releasing pork from stockpiles to help cool surging prices ahead of Oct. 1 celebrations of the Communist Party's 70th anniversary in power. The price of pork, China's staple meat, has soared almost 50% from a year ago due to a devastating outbreak of African...
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FILE - In this May 7, 2009, file photo, author, comedian and co-founder of the Yippie party as well as stand-up satirist, Paul Krassner, 77, poses for a photo at his home in Desert Hot Springs, Calif. Krassner, the publisher, author and radical political activist on the front lines of 1960s counterculture who helped tie together his loose-knit prankster group by naming them the Yippies, has died. His daughter, Holly Krassner Dawson, says Krassner died Sunday, July 21, 2019, at his home in Desert Hot Springs, Calif. He was 87. (AP Photo/Eric Reed, File)
July 21, 2019 - 6:40 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Paul Krassner, the publisher, author and radical political activist on the front lines of 1960s counterculture who helped tie together his loose-knit prankster group by naming them the Yippies, died Sunday in Southern California, his daughter said. Krassner died at his home in...
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Yu Kangzhen, China's Vice President of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, answers questions at a press conference in Beijing on Thursday, July 4, 2019. Yu says the death toll from a disease that struck China's pig herds has risen to 1.2 million and the government is stepping up efforts to contain outbreaks. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
July 04, 2019 - 2:46 am
BEIJING (AP) — The death toll from a disease outbreak in China's pig herds that has pushed up global pork prices has risen to 1.2 million animals, but its spread has "significantly slowed," a deputy agriculture minister said Thursday. Authorities are stepping up efforts to contain African swine...
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February 08, 2019 - 10:54 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China has reported a new outbreak of African swine fever that is threating the country's vital pork industry. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs reported Friday the disease had been detected on a farm in Yongzhou in the central province of Hunan, where 4,600 pigs were...
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In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 31, 2018, pigs are seen in a hog pen in a village in Linquan county in central China's Anhui province. Reeling from rising feed costs in Beijing's tariff fight with U.S. President Donald Trump, Chinese pig farmers face a new blow from an outbreak of African swine fever that has sent an economic shockwave through the countryside. (Chinatopix Via AP)
November 23, 2018 - 6:13 am
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese pig farmers, already reeling from rising feed costs in Beijing's tariff fight with U.S. President Donald Trump, face a new blow from an outbreak of African swine fever that has sent an economic shockwave through the countryside. First detected in August, the disease has...
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In this July 12, 2018 photo, farmer Don Bloss checks on the operation of an auger transferring corn on his farm in Pawnee City, Neb. Farmers and agricultural economists are worried that president Donald Trump’s trade, immigration and biofuels policies will cost farms billions of dollars in lost income and force some out of business. Bloss, who grows corn, soybeans, sorghum and wheat on his farm in the southeastern Nebraska community of Pawnee City, said he’s already seen a few neighbors quit farming as they struggled to make a profit even before the tariff battle began this year. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
July 15, 2018 - 12:06 pm
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Even before the specter of a trade war with China and other countries threatened to cost them billions of dollars, American farmers were feeling the squeeze from fluctuating crop prices and other factors that have halved their overall income in recent years. The threat of...
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