Pets

This undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Society shows Nadia, a Malayan tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York. Nadia has tested positive for the new coronavirus, in what is believed to be the first known infection in an animal in the U.S. or a tiger anywhere, federal officials and the zoo said Sunday, April 5, 2020. (Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
April 05, 2020 - 10:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A tiger at the Bronx Zoo has tested positive for the new coronavirus, in what is believed to be the first known infection in an animal in the U.S. or a tiger anywhere, federal officials and the zoo said Sunday. The 4-year-old Malayan tiger named Nadia — and six other tigers and...
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In this March 27, 2020 photo, Kim Simeon and children Annabel, 9, and Brennan, 11, pose for a photo with Nala, a dog they are fostering, in Omaha, Neb. The Simeon family was headed home to Omaha from a much-needed Smoky Mountains vacation when Kim Simeon spotted a social media post from the Nebraska Humane Society, pleading with people to consider fostering a pet. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
1010 WINS Newsroom
April 04, 2020 - 9:13 am
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The Simeon family was heading home to Omaha from a Smoky Mountains vacation when Kim Simeon spotted a social media post from the Nebraska Humane Society, pleading with people to consider fostering a pet amid concerns about how the coronavirus would affect operations. A day later...
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Lizzy Buczak
March 28, 2020 - 2:06 pm
The best way to spend your time in self-quarantine? With free beer in hand and a furry friend by your side. Busch’s new initiative aims to help clear out the shelters and find pups a new home amidst the coronavirus pandemic. Read more.
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Lizzy Buczak
March 17, 2020 - 3:03 pm
If social distancing has left you feeling lonely and craving company, animal shelters have the purr-fect solution – foster a furry friend for the time-being. Find out how you can foster a pet during the coronavirus outbreak.
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John McDevitt
March 05, 2020 - 11:32 am
After a dog in Hong Kong was found to have a low level of the fast-spreading coronavirus, concerns of animals getting the disease or spreading it grew. Here’s what you need to know about your pets’ susceptibility to the contagious illness.
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FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2020, file photo, a resident wearing mask walks her dogs in Beijing. Pet cats and dogs cannot pass the new coronavirus on to humans, but they can test positive for low levels of the pathogen if they catch it from their owners. That's the conclusion of Hong Kong's Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department after a dog in quarantine tested weak positive for the virus Feb. 27, Feb. 28 and March 2, using the canine's nasal and oral cavity samples. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 05, 2020 - 2:36 am
HONG KONG (AP) — Pet cats and dogs cannot pass the new coronavirus on to humans, but they can test positive for low levels of the pathogen if they catch it from their owners. That's the conclusion of Hong Kong's Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department after a dog in quarantine tested...
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Tarrah Gibbons
March 03, 2020 - 2:03 pm
You finally don’t have to decide whether you like cats or dogs more. The internet is going nuts for a puppy in Vietnam named Dúi, who people say looks like a cat and dog cloned together.
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Gabriela Arevalo
February 21, 2020 - 2:39 pm
Pet-friendly offices are becoming an increasingly popular work benefit. A new survey shows that employees are willing to give up certain perks if it means getting to bring their pet to work with them. What’s your opinion? Take our poll!
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1010 WINS Newsroom
February 05, 2020 - 2:37 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A sick Hawaiian monk seal under the care of wildlife scientists is suffering from a parasitic infection often spread via feral cat feces, officials said. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials determined that the seal suffering from toxoplasmosis, the Honolulu...
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In this April 2016 photo provided by the United States Department of Agriculture, detector canine "Bello" works in a citrus orchard in Texas, searching for citrus greening disease, a bacteria that is spread by a tiny insect that feeds on citrus trees. (Gavin Poole/USDA via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
February 03, 2020 - 9:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dog detectives might be able to help save ailing citrus groves, research published Monday suggests. Scientists trained dogs to sniff out a crop disease called citrus greening that has hit orange, lemon and grapefruit orchards in Florida, California and Texas. The dogs can detect...
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