Medical research

July 17, 2018 - 2:41 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Scientists no longer have to collect poop to get key data on the health of endangered right whales. A new study indicates that under the right conditions, scientist can get real-time hormonal data by collecting the spray from whales' blowholes. Researchers with the Anderson...
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This Thursday, March 29, 2018 photo shows a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles. A 10-year study released on Monday, July 2, 2018 shows that coffee drinkers had a lower risk of death than abstainers, including those who downed at least eight cups daily. The benefit was seen with instant, ground, decaf, and in people with genetic glitches affecting how their bodies use caffeine. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
July 02, 2018 - 11:02 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Go ahead and have that cup of coffee, maybe even several more. New research shows it may boost chances for a longer life, even for those who down at least eight cups daily. In a study of nearly half-a-million British adults, coffee drinkers had a slightly lower risk of death over 10...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2018, file photo, LGBT activists shout slogans during a rally against a planned revision to Indonesia's criminal code that would criminalize unmarried and gay sex outside the Parliament in Jakarta, Indonesia. The death of a 20-year-old man with HIV who died after "effectively committed suicide" by stopping anti-viral medication is a sign of an out of control but little acknowledged epidemic of HIV among gay men in Indonesia that researchers say is now being fueled by a gay hate climate fostered by the country's conservative political and religious leaders. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana, File)
July 02, 2018 - 2:48 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Disowned by his father and ill-equipped to deal with the stigma of HIV/AIDS, a young man who died in the central Indonesian city of Yogyakarta early this year had "effectively committed suicide" by stopping anti-viral medication, according to a doctor familiar with the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a man runs along the Schuylkill River on Kelly Drive in Philadelphia. In may seem like a contradiction, but more U.S. adults say they are exercising at the same time more adults are becoming obese, according to a survey released on Thursday, June 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
June 28, 2018 - 11:07 am
NEW YORK (AP) — It may seem like a contradiction, but more adults in the U.S. say they are exercising at the same time more of them are becoming obese. About 24 percent of adults last year said they exercise enough each week to meet government recommendations for both muscle strengthening and...
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This Aug. 8, 2013 photo provided by Duke University shows Dr. Matthias Gromeier at his laboratory at Duke in Durham, N.C. Gromeier developed a modified poliovirus to attack glioblastoma brain tumor cells. One of the world's most dreaded viruses has been turned into an immune system therapy to fight deadly brain tumors. Survival was better than expected for patients in a small study treated with the modified poliovirus, which helped their bodies attack their cancer, doctors reported on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Shawn Rocco/Duke Health via AP)
June 26, 2018 - 10:00 am
One of the world's most dreaded viruses has been turned into a treatment to fight deadly brain tumors. Survival was better than expected for patients in a small study who were given genetically modified poliovirus, which helped their bodies attack the cancer, doctors report. It was the first human...
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June 21, 2018 - 11:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A provocative new study says viruses that sneak into the brain just might play a role in Alzheimer's. Some scientists have long suspected viruses or bacteria somehow set the stage for Alzheimer's. Now, the main theory is that sticky brain-clogging plaques are the culprit. Thursday...
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FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2018, file photo, a medical assistant at a community health center gives a patient a flu shot in Seattle. A newer kind of flu vaccine worked a little bit better in seniors this past winter than traditional shots, the government reported Wednesday, June 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
June 20, 2018 - 1:41 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A newer kind of flu vaccine worked a little bit better in seniors this past winter than traditional shots, the government reported Wednesday. Overall, flu vaccines barely worked at all in keeping people 65 and older out of the hospital, with roughly 24 percent effectiveness. The...
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FILE - In this June 7, 2008 file photo, a woman evaluates the aroma of a wine in California. On Friday, June 15, 2018, National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins announced the NIH is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, citing ethical problems that would undermine the credibility of its findings. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
June 15, 2018 - 8:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, saying ethical problems with how the research was planned and funded undermine its credibility. The National Institutes of Health used money from the alcohol...
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FILE - This June 8, 2007 file photo shows a glass of milk on a table during a family breakfast in Montgomery, Ala. Nearly 20 years ago, about nearly half of high school students said they drank at least one glass of milk a day. But now it’s down to less than a third, according to a survey released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, June 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Rob Carr)
June 14, 2018 - 7:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Fewer U.S. teens are smoking, having sex and doing drugs these days. Oh, and they're drinking less milk, too. Less than one-third of high school students drink a glass of milk a day, according to a large government survey released Thursday. About two decades ago, it was nearly half...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2003, file photo, Rep. Stephanie Stuckey Benfield, D-Decatur, promotes the breast cancer prevention stamp from the well on the floor of the House in Atlanta. Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp enabled a landmark study that showed which women need chemo and which do not. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)
June 04, 2018 - 4:58 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp put...
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