Law enforcement technology

FILE- In this Tuesday, May 2, 2017, file photo, Verizon corporate signage is captured on a store in Manhattan's Midtown area, in New York. Verizon is pledging to stop selling data to outsiders through middlemen that can pinpoint the location of mobile phones, the Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
June 19, 2018 - 10:57 am
Verizon is pledging to stop sales through intermediaries of data that pinpoints the location of mobile phones to outside companies, the Associated Press has learned. It is the first major U.S. wireless carrier to step back from a business practice that has drawn criticism for endangering privacy...
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FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2017 file photo, Israeli Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office in Bnei Brak, east Tel Aviv, Israel. Erdan said prior to a security conference opening Tuesday, June 12, 2018 in Israel, that authorities have foiled over 200 Palestinian attacks by monitoring social media, sifting through vast amounts of data and identifying prospective assailants ahead of time. While the technology appears to be effective, its tactics drew angry Palestinian condemnation and have raised questions about civil liberties. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, File)
June 12, 2018 - 7:42 am
JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli authorities have foiled over 200 Palestinian attacks by monitoring social media and sifting through vast amounts of data to identify prospective assailants ahead of time, according to Israel's public security minister. These pre-emptive actions put Israel at the forefront...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle. While the Seattle Police Department bars officers from using real-time facial recognition in body camera video, privacy activists are concerned that a proliferation of the technology could turn the cameras into tools of mass surveillance. The ACLU and other organizations on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, asked Amazon to stop selling its facial-recognition tool, called Rekognition, to law enforcement agencies. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 22, 2018 - 6:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon's decision to market a powerful face recognition tool to police is alarming privacy advocates, who say the tech giant's reach could vastly accelerate a dystopian future in which camera-equipped officers can identify and track people in real time, whether they're involved in...
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