Law enforcement technology

FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2018, file photo, a man, who declined to be identified, has his face painted to represent efforts to defeat facial recognition during a protest at Amazon headquarters over the company's facial recognition system, "Rekognition," in Seattle. San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies as the technology creeps increasingly into daily life. Studies have shown error rates in facial-analysis systems built by Amazon, IBM and Microsoft were far higher for darker-skinned women than lighter-skinned men. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 13, 2019 - 1:00 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies as the technology creeps increasingly into daily life. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors is scheduled to vote Tuesday on broad surveillance...
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FILE - In this March 26, 2019, file photo, an airline passenger walk in the arrivals terminal at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Va. Newly documents filed in a federal lawsuit claim that U.S. government searches of phones and laptops at airports are on the rise and are being conducted for reasons beyond immigration and customs enforcement. There were 33,295 searches in fiscal 2018. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
April 30, 2019 - 6:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. government searches of travelers' cellphones and laptops at airports and border crossings nearly quadrupled since 2015 and were being done for reasons beyond customs and immigration enforcement, according to papers filed Tuesday in a federal lawsuit that claims scouring the...
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April 29, 2019 - 1:35 pm
LONDON (AP) — Police in England and Wales are distributing consent forms urging victims of sexual assault and other crimes to turn over access to mobile phones and other electronic devices or risk having their cases dropped. The National Police Chiefs' Council said Monday that police will only seek...
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FILE - In this May 10, 2017 file photo, Ben Lieberman poses for a photo at his home in Chappaqua, N.Y. Lieberman, whose 19-year-old son died in a crash involving distracted driving, is urging support for a legislative proposal that would make Nevada the first state in the U.S. to allow police to use prototype technology to find out if a person was using a cellphone during a car crash. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)
March 17, 2019 - 10:44 am
CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Most states ban texting behind the wheel, but a legislative proposal could make Nevada one of the first states to allow police to use a contentious technology to find out if a person was using a cellphone during a car crash. The measure is igniting privacy concerns and has...
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In this Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Rebecca Shutt, who works in the New York Police Department's Office of Crime Control Strategies, poses for a photo in New York. Shutt utilizes a software called Patternizr, which allows crime analysts to compare robbery, larceny and theft incidents to the millions of crimes logged in the NYPD's database, aiding their hunt for crime patterns. It's much faster than the old method, which involved analysts sifting through reports and racking their brains for similar incidents. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
March 10, 2019 - 2:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — When a syringe-wielding drill thief tried sticking up a Home Depot near Yankee Stadium, police figured out quickly that it wasn't a one-off. A man had also used a syringe a few weeks earlier while stealing a drill at another Home Depot 7 miles (11 kilometers) south in Manhattan. The...
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January 25, 2019 - 3:52 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facial-detection technology that Amazon is marketing to law enforcement often misidentifies women, particularly those with darker skin, according to researchers from MIT and the University of Toronto. Privacy and civil rights advocates have called on Amazon to stop marketing its...
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In this Oct. 31, 2018, photo, Huang Yongzhen, CEO of Watrix, demonstrates the use of his firm's gait recognition software at his company's offices in Beijing. A Chinese technology startup hopes to begin selling software that recognizes people by their body shape and how they walk, enabling identification when faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, “gait recognition” is part of a major push to develop artificial-intelligence and data-driven surveillance across China, raising concern about how far the technology will go. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 05, 2018 - 9:48 pm
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese authorities have begun deploying a new surveillance tool: "gait recognition" software that uses people's body shapes and how they walk to identify them, even when their faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, "gait...
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NYPD officers depart from the Time Warner Center area on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in New York. A police bomb squad was sent to CNN's offices in New York City and the newsroom was evacuated because of a suspicious package. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)
October 24, 2018 - 10:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The packages arrived in familiar manila envelopes affixed with lots of stamps, some bearing the American flag. But what was inside was alarming: crude pipe bombs wrapped in black tape, with wires sprouting from each end. None of the explosives detonated, and no one was hurt. But...
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October 18, 2018 - 11:34 pm
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The president of Australia's top lawyers' group told a parliamentary inquiry that proposed cybersecurity laws to force global technology companies such as Facebook and Google to help police by unscrambling encrypted messages sent by extremists and other criminals would...
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In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 17 2018, police search a suspect for guns and drugs during a raid on a known drug house in Mannenburg, Cape Town, South Africa. As gunshots ring out in one of South Africa’s most dangerous neighborhoods, a new technology detects the gun’s location and immediately alerts police. (AP Photo/Nasief Manie)
September 13, 2018 - 6:04 am
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — As gunshots ring out in one of South Africa's most dangerous neighborhoods, a new technology detects the gun's location and immediately alerts police. South Africa is the first country outside the United States to implement the "shotspotter" audio technology, which is...
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