Law enforcement technology

In this Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Rebecca Shutt, who works in the New York Police Department's Office of Crime Control Strategies, poses for a photo in New York. Shutt utilizes a software called Patternizr, which allows crime analysts to compare robbery, larceny and theft incidents to the millions of crimes logged in the NYPD's database, aiding their hunt for crime patterns. It's much faster than the old method, which involved analysts sifting through reports and racking their brains for similar incidents. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
March 10, 2019 - 2:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — When a syringe-wielding drill thief tried sticking up a Home Depot near Yankee Stadium, police figured out quickly that it wasn't a one-off. A man had also used a syringe a few weeks earlier while stealing a drill at another Home Depot 7 miles (11 kilometers) south in Manhattan. The...
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January 25, 2019 - 3:52 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facial-detection technology that Amazon is marketing to law enforcement often misidentifies women, particularly those with darker skin, according to researchers from MIT and the University of Toronto. Privacy and civil rights advocates have called on Amazon to stop marketing its...
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In this Oct. 31, 2018, photo, Huang Yongzhen, CEO of Watrix, demonstrates the use of his firm's gait recognition software at his company's offices in Beijing. A Chinese technology startup hopes to begin selling software that recognizes people by their body shape and how they walk, enabling identification when faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, “gait recognition” is part of a major push to develop artificial-intelligence and data-driven surveillance across China, raising concern about how far the technology will go. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 05, 2018 - 9:48 pm
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese authorities have begun deploying a new surveillance tool: "gait recognition" software that uses people's body shapes and how they walk to identify them, even when their faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, "gait...
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NYPD officers depart from the Time Warner Center area on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in New York. A police bomb squad was sent to CNN's offices in New York City and the newsroom was evacuated because of a suspicious package. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)
October 24, 2018 - 10:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The packages arrived in familiar manila envelopes affixed with lots of stamps, some bearing the American flag. But what was inside was alarming: crude pipe bombs wrapped in black tape, with wires sprouting from each end. None of the explosives detonated, and no one was hurt. But...
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October 18, 2018 - 11:34 pm
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The president of Australia's top lawyers' group told a parliamentary inquiry that proposed cybersecurity laws to force global technology companies such as Facebook and Google to help police by unscrambling encrypted messages sent by extremists and other criminals would...
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In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 17 2018, police search a suspect for guns and drugs during a raid on a known drug house in Mannenburg, Cape Town, South Africa. As gunshots ring out in one of South Africa’s most dangerous neighborhoods, a new technology detects the gun’s location and immediately alerts police. (AP Photo/Nasief Manie)
September 13, 2018 - 6:04 am
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — As gunshots ring out in one of South Africa's most dangerous neighborhoods, a new technology detects the gun's location and immediately alerts police. South Africa is the first country outside the United States to implement the "shotspotter" audio technology, which is...
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The United States installation "Face Values", by designers Zachary Lieberman, sat back left, and R. Luke DuBois, sat back second left, which explores the role of facial detection technology in society is displayed during a media preview for the London Design Biennale at Somerset House in London, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018. The event runs from September 4 to 23. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
September 03, 2018 - 1:05 pm
LONDON (AP) — Don't judge by appearances. It's an age-old piece of advice that is being roundly ignored by corporations, governments and law-enforcement agencies around the globe. British police use facial-recognition technology to scan crowds for suspects. Owners of the latest iPhones can unlock...
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FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. In a 5-4 decision Friday, The Supreme Court says police generally need a search warrant if they want to track criminal suspects' movements by collecting information about where they've used their cellphones. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 23, 2018 - 2:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Police generally need a warrant to look at records that reveal where cellphone users have been, the Supreme Court ruled Friday in a big victory for privacy interests in the digital age. The justices' 5-4 decision marks a big change in how police may obtain information that phone...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, May 2, 2017, file photo, Verizon corporate signage is captured on a store in Manhattan's Midtown area, in New York. Verizon is pledging to stop selling data to outsiders through middlemen that can pinpoint the location of mobile phones, the Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
June 19, 2018 - 10:57 am
Verizon is pledging to stop sales through intermediaries of data that pinpoints the location of mobile phones to outside companies, the Associated Press has learned. It is the first major U.S. wireless carrier to step back from a business practice that has drawn criticism for endangering privacy...
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FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2017 file photo, Israeli Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office in Bnei Brak, east Tel Aviv, Israel. Erdan said prior to a security conference opening Tuesday, June 12, 2018 in Israel, that authorities have foiled over 200 Palestinian attacks by monitoring social media, sifting through vast amounts of data and identifying prospective assailants ahead of time. While the technology appears to be effective, its tactics drew angry Palestinian condemnation and have raised questions about civil liberties. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, File)
June 12, 2018 - 7:42 am
JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli authorities have foiled over 200 Palestinian attacks by monitoring social media and sifting through vast amounts of data to identify prospective assailants ahead of time, according to Israel's public security minister. These pre-emptive actions put Israel at the forefront...
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