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Trevor Hughes, Trevor Hughes-USA TODAY NETWORK
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 06, 2019 - 8:37 am
SHARONVILLE, Ohio (AP) — A man confused about Ohio drug laws has called a police department demanding that officers return the small amount of marijuana they "stole" from him. WXIX-TV reports the man told a Sharonville police dispatcher in an expletive-laced call Tuesday that it's legal to possess...
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Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, pauses during a press conference at the government building in Hong Kong, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Lam says the extradition bill that sparked months of demonstrations will be formally withdrawn in the legislative council without the need for debate or vote. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 05, 2019 - 8:41 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said Thursday that the decision to withdraw an extradition bill that sparked months of demonstrations in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory was her government's own initiative to break the impasse, and not Beijing's directive. Lam told a news...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
September 05, 2019 - 5:29 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Amazon-owned doorbell camera company Ring is facing questions from a U.S. senator over its partnerships with police departments around the country. Sen. Edward Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, sent a letter Thursday to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos raising privacy and civil liberty concerns...
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Crime scene tape surrounds the home of Seth Aaron Ator, the alleged gunman in a West Texas rampage Saturday, on Monday, Sept. 2, 2019, near Odessa, Texas. Officers killed 36-year-old Ator on Saturday outside a busy Odessa movie theater after a spate of violence that spanned 10 miles (16 kilometers), killing multiple people and injuring around two dozen others. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 05, 2019 - 3:05 pm
DALLAS (AP) — Investigators looking for how a Texas gunman obtained an assault-style rifle used in a Labor Day weekend rampage despite failing a background check have searched the home of a man they believe was involved in the "transfer" of the weapon, a federal law enforcement official said...
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FILE - In this March 26, 2019, file photo, actor Jussie Smollett smiles and waves to supporters before leaving Cook County Court after his charges were dropped in Chicago. Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion this week arguing that the actor should not have to pay the city of Chicago $130,000 for the police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack in January, because he had no way of knowing how much time and money the department would spend on the probe. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 04, 2019 - 5:38 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Jussie Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion arguing that the actor should not have to pay Chicago $130,000 for a police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack, because he couldn't have known how much time and money the department would spend looking...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, March 28, 2012 file photo, a surveillance camera is seen by the Olympic Stadium at the Olympic Park in London. A British court has ruled that a police force’s trial of automated facial recognition technology is lawful, dealing a blow to activists concerned about its implications for privacy. The court said Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019 that existing laws adequately cover the trial by the South Wales police force, in what’s believed to be the world’s first legal case on how a law enforcement agency uses the new technology. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, file)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 04, 2019 - 9:37 am
LONDON (AP) — A British court ruled Wednesday that a police force's use of automated facial recognition technology is lawful, dealing a blow to an activist concerned about its implications for privacy. Existing laws adequately cover the South Wales police force's use of the technology in a trial,...
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CORRECTS SPELLING OF VICTIM'S FIRST NAME TO LEILAH INSTEAD OF LEILA - High School students Celeste Lujan, left, and Yasmin Natera mourn their friend Leilah Hernandez, one of the victims of the Saturday shooting in Odessa, at a memorial service Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 02, 2019 - 10:04 pm
ODESSA, Texas (AP) — The gunman in a West Texas rampage "was on a long spiral of going down" and had been fired from his oil services job the morning he killed seven people, calling 911 both before and after the shooting began, authorities said Monday. Officers killed 36-year-old Seth Aaron Ator on...
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Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke announces that he does not want to speak the name of the shooter from Saturday's shooting during a news conference, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Instead, the department released the name of the gunman through a Facebook post. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 02, 2019 - 11:46 am
When law enforcement authorities gathered to discuss details of a mass shooting in West Texas that left seven people dead, there was one bit of information they refused to provide on live television: the name of the gunman. Instead, they decided to release the name through a Facebook post. Odessa...
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Authorities cordon off a part of the sidewalk in the 5100 block of E. 42nd Street in Odessa, Texas, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019. Several people were dead after a gunman who hijacked a postal service vehicle in West Texas shot more than 20 people, authorities said Saturday. The gunman was killed and a few law enforcement officers were among the injured. (Mark Rogers/Odessa American via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 01, 2019 - 10:11 pm
MIDLAND, Texas (AP) — The Latest on a shooting in West Texas (all times local): 9 p.m. Hundreds of West Texas residents stood and bowed their heads together, reciting the Lord's Prayer at a vigil for those killed in Saturday's mass shooting. In Spanish and English, pastors asked those gathered at...
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In this Tuesday June 4, 2019 photograph, Sean Ellis poses for a photo at the law office of his attorney Rosemary Scapicchio in Boston. During the 22 years he spent in prison after being convicted of killing a Boston police detective, Ellis believed there was something suspicious about the officers who led the murder investigation. He just couldn’t prove it. It would take years of digging and scores of public information requests from his attorneys to uncover evidence that several officers investigating the 1993 murder case were involved in criminal activity, information that wasn’t shared with the defense. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 01, 2019 - 4:52 pm
BOSTON (AP) — During the 22 years he spent in prison after being convicted of killing a Boston police detective, Sean Ellis believed there was something suspicious about the officers who led the murder investigation. He just couldn't prove it. It would take years of digging and scores of public...
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