Invasive species

A bison rubs against a bush at a wildlife sanctuary in Milovice, Czech Republic, Friday, July 17, 2020. Wild horses, bison and other big-hoofed animals once roamed freely in much of Europe. Now they are transforming a former military base outside the Czech capital in an ambitious project to improve biodiversity. Where occupying Soviet troops once held exercises, massive bovines called tauros and other heavy beasts now munch on the invasive plants that took over the base years ago. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
1010 WINS Newsroom
August 08, 2020 - 3:36 pm
MILOVICE, Czech Republic (AP) — Wild horses, bison and other big-hoofed animals once roamed freely in much of Europe. Now they are transforming a former military base outside the Czech capital in an ambitious project to improve biodiversity. Where occupying Soviet troops once held exercises,...
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FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 23, 2019, file photo, female northern white rhinos Fatu, right, and Najin, left, the last two northern white rhinos on the planet, are fed some carrots by a ranger in their enclosure at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, in Kenya. Although scientists have long focused on the world’s predators, a massive new study finds that herbivores, critters that eat plants, are the animals most at risk of extinction. A bit more than one in four species of herbivores are considered threatened, endangered or vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the world’s scientific authority on extinction risk, according to a study published Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020, in the journal Science Advances. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
August 05, 2020 - 2:23 pm
Although scientists often worry most about the loss of the world’s predators, a comprehensive new study finds that plant-eating herbivores are the animals most at risk of extinction. About one in four species of herbivores, 25.5%, are considered threatened, endangered or vulnerable by the...
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In this Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a dead Asian giant hornet is photographed in a lab in Olympia, Wash. The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the "Murder Hornet" by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Quinlyn Baine/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 04, 2020 - 10:21 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch killer dubbed the "Murder Hornet" with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state, where entomologists were making plans to wipe it out. The giant Asian insect, with a sting that could be fatal to some people, is just...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
November 25, 2019 - 4:47 pm
HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — Christmas trees arriving by ship to the U.S. territory of Guam are getting decked out with a special decoration: Doses of methyl bromide gas to prevent them from becoming nesting grounds for invasive species. Guam’s Customs and Quarantine’s BioSecurity Task Force is filling...
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This 2005 photo provided by Bethany Bradley shows cheatgrass, at right, invading shrubs, left, near Lovelock, Nev. A new study finds that for much of the United States, invasive grass species, such as cheatgrass, are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California. (Bethany Bradley/University of Massachusetts via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 04, 2019 - 3:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds that for much of the United States, invasive grass species are making wildfires more frequent, especially in fire-prone California. Study co-author Bethany Bradley of the University of Massachusetts says in a way a dozen non-native grass species act like little...
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FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2015 file photo, fire engulfs sagebrush near Roosevelt, Wash. Federal officials have released a plan intended to reduce the size of giant rangeland wildfires that have become an increasing problem in the Great Basin for cattle ranchers, recreationists and some 350 species of wildlife, including imperiled sage grouse. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
June 24, 2019 - 7:18 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Federal officials have released their review on removing or changing vegetation over a huge swath of the U.S. West to stop wildfires on land used for cattle ranching, recreation and habitat for imperiled sage grouse. The work would occur on strips of land up to 165 yards (150...
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FILE - In this June 7, 2017, file photo, two wild elephants, part of a herd that arrived at a wetland near the Thakurkuchi railway station engage in a tussle on the outskirts of Gauhati, Assam, India. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/ Anupam Nath, File)
May 06, 2019 - 6:41 am
Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday in the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity. It's all because of humans, but it's not too late to fix the problem...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2012 file photo a man tosses dirt on a fire as he tries to save his home on Bettas Road near Cle Elum, Wash. Federal officials have released a plan to save sagebrush habitats in Western states that support cattle ranching, recreation and 350 wildlife species, including imperiled sage grouse. Officials say the 248-page document released this month is a paradigm shift relying on advances in technology and analytics to categorize sagebrush areas based on resistance and resilience to wildfire. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson,File)
April 23, 2019 - 2:19 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A new plan to save sagebrush habitats in Western states that support cattle ranching, recreation and 350 wildlife species — including imperiled sage grouse — is a paradigm shift in strategy, federal officials said. The 248-page document released this month emphasizes new...
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FILE - This Sept. 26, 2018 file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a 4-year-old female gray wolf emerging from her cage at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan. Environmental research projects on endangered animals and air and water quality are being delayed and disrupted by the monthlong partial federal government shutdown and not just those conducted by government agencies. (National Park Service via AP, File)
January 24, 2019 - 11:38 am
The rainwater collection system is broken at the environmental research station on a remote, rocky Pacific island off the California coast. So is a crane used to hoist small boats in and out of the water. A two-year supply of diesel fuel for the power generators is almost gone. U.S. Fish and...
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November 10, 2018 - 8:57 am
MIAMI (AP) — Officials say a Florida trapper has captured a record-setting python as part of a program to remove the invasive species from the Everglades. A South Florida Water Management District news release says Kyle Penniston captured a 17-foot, 5-inch (5.3-meter) female Burmese python while...
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