International adoption

1010 WINS Newsroom
May 06, 2020 - 3:13 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The number of foreign children adopted by U.S. parents fell by more than one-quarter last year, extending a 15-year decline, according to State Department figures released Wednesday. Sharp drops in adoptions from China and Ethiopia more than offset increases from Ukraine, Liberia...
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This Sept. 13, 2019 photo provided by the family shows Adebambo Alli, left, Robin Gallite and their adopted daughter, Adenike-Rae, at the Lekki Conservation Center, a natural reserve protecting the wetlands of the Lekki peninsula in Nigeria. Stranded in Nigeria for months, the couple had a rare chance to board a U.S-bound evacuation flight amid the coronavirus outbreak. They refused to fly because Adenike-Rae has yet to receive a U.S. visa and they would have had to leave her behind. (Adebambo Alli via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
April 14, 2020 - 12:39 pm
Stranded in Nigeria for months, a Colorado couple had a rare chance to catch an evacuation flight to the U.S. recently during the coronavirus outbreak. But they refused because they would have had to leave behind their adopted daughter, who has yet to get a U.S. visa. “After we found our daughter...
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A woman wearing a mask stands in front of a notice recommending to keep the social distance of 1-meter between people, at the Rome Leonardo da Vinci International Airport, Thursday, March 12, 2020. Airlines and travelers are still sorting out the new travel ban that President Donald Trump announced late Wednesday, barring most foreign visitors from continental Europe for 30 days. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 13, 2020 - 12:00 am
Airlines and travelers are still sorting out the new travel ban that President Donald Trump announced late Wednesday that bars most foreign visitors coming to the U.S. from continental Europe for 30 days. The ban will affect 7,300 flights — and more than 2 million airline seats — scheduled from 26...
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FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2019, file photo, Maricopa County Assessor Paul Petersen leaves court in Salt Lake City. He resigned from his elected position on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020, months after being charged with running a human smuggling operation that paid pregnant women from the Marshall Islands to give up their babies in the U.S. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
January 07, 2020 - 5:55 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — An elected official in metro Phoenix resigned Tuesday, months after being charged with running a human smuggling operation that paid pregnant women from the Marshall Islands to give up their babies in the U.S. The resignation of Maricopa County Assessor Paul Petersen came after...
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FILE - This undated booking photo provided by the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office shows County Assessor Paul Petersen, who has been indicted in an adoption fraud case. Petersen is accused of arranging for dozens of pregnant women from the Marshall Islands to come to the U.S. to give their children up for adoption. Utah also has charged him with 11 felony counts, including human smuggling, sale of a child and communications fraud. The Maricopa County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Wednesday, Oct. 23, to notify Petersen that it plans to consider suspending him for up to 120 days. It can't remove him from office and he's refused to resign. (Maricopa County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 28, 2019 - 8:20 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — An elected official in Arizona was suspended Monday after he was charged with running a human smuggling scheme that brought pregnant women from the Marshall Islands to the U.S. to give birth and then paid them to give up their children for adoption. Leaders in Arizona's most populous...
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This undated photo provided by the Maricopa County Assessor's Office shows Assessor Paul Petersen. Petersen has been indicted in an adoption fraud case, accused of arranging for dozens of pregnant women from the Marshall Islands to come to the U.S. to give their children up for adoption. Utah also has charged him on multiple felony counts, including human smuggling, sale of a child and communications fraud. (Maricopa County Assessor's Office via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 09, 2019 - 4:59 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona elected official has been charged with human smuggling in an adoption fraud scheme that brought dozens of pregnant women from the Marshall Islands to the U.S. to give up their children for adoption, court records show. Maricopa County Assessor Paul Petersen was charged in...
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A woman jogs past political campaign posters at Reforma avenue in Guatemala City, early Saturday, June 15, 2019. The road to Sunday's presidential election in Guatemala has been a chaotic flurry of court rulings and shenanigans, illegal party-switching and allegations of malfeasance that torpedoed the candidacies of two of the top three candidates. (AP Photo/Oliver de Ros)
June 16, 2019 - 12:33 am
GUATEMALA CITY (AP) — Guatemalans head to the polls Sunday to choose their next president, as well as a vice president, congressional representatives and mayors. With 19 candidates in the race for president, a runoff vote is likely in August. Unemployment, violence, corruption, rising costs of...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 28, 2018 file photo, a boy stands next to a staircase while looking out from the Nest of Hope orphanage in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The number of foreign children adopted by U.S. parents plunged nearly 14 percent last year, extending a decline that's now continued for 14 years, according to new State Department figures. Adoptions from Haiti, which is trying to establish a domestic foster care program, dropped from 227 to 196. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)
March 14, 2019 - 1:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The number of foreign children adopted by U.S. parents plunged nearly 14 percent last year, extending a decline that's now continued for 14 years, according to State Department figures released Thursday. Sharp drops in adoptions from China and Ethiopia more than offset notable...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2013, file photo, Veronica, 3, a child at the center of an international adoption dispute at the time, smiles in a bathroom of the Cherokee Nation Jack Brown Center in Tahlequah, Okla. A federal law that gives preference to Native American families in child welfare proceedings involving Native children is facing a significant legal challenge. In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the law didn’t apply in a South Carolina case involving Veronica because her Cherokee father was absent from part of her life. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP, File)
March 13, 2019 - 6:09 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A 1978 law giving preference to Native American families in foster care and adoption proceedings involving American Indian children is an unconstitutional race-based intrusion on state powers that has caused families to be "literally torn apart," an attorney told a federal...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2013, file photo, Veronica, 3, a child at the center of an international adoption dispute at the time, smiles in a bathroom of the Cherokee Nation Jack Brown Center in Tahlequah, Okla. A federal law that gives preference to Native American families in child welfare proceedings involving Native children is facing a significant legal challenge. In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the law didn’t apply in a South Carolina case involving Veronica because her Cherokee father was absent from part of her life. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP, File)
March 13, 2019 - 1:17 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A federal law that gives preference to Native American families in foster care and adoption proceedings involving Native American children is facing the most significant legal challenge since it was enacted more than 40 years ago. A federal judge in Texas ruled the Indian...
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