Infectious diseases

FILE - This April 28, 2010, file photo shows the GlaxoSmithKline offices in London. On Friday, July 20, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved GlaxoSmithKline’s Krintafel, a simpler, one-dose treatment, to prevent relapses of malaria. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
July 20, 2018 - 5:58 pm
U.S. regulators have approved a simpler, one-dose treatment to prevent relapses of malaria. Standard treatment takes two weeks and many patients don't finish taking all the doses. Malaria is caused by parasites that are spread through mosquito bites. The parasites can remain dormant in the liver...
Read More
This 1975 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a cluster of smallpox viruses. On Friday, July 13, 2018, U.S. regulators announced the approval of the first treatment for smallpox _ a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago _ in case the virus is used in a terror attack. (Fred Murphy/CDC via AP)
July 13, 2018 - 7:08 pm
U.S. regulators Friday approved the first treatment for smallpox — a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago — in case the virus is used in a terror attack. Smallpox, which is highly contagious, was eradicated worldwide by 1980 after a huge vaccination campaign. But people born since...
Read More
July 12, 2018 - 9:55 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a popular Kellogg's cereal has been linked to a salmonella outbreak that has infected 100 people in 33 states. The CDC announced Thursday that customers should avoid Honey Smacks, tweeting, "Do not eat this cereal." The agency says...
Read More
July 03, 2018 - 12:21 pm
SAO PAULO (AP) — An outbreak of measles is growing in Brazil after cases were imported from neighboring Venezuela. Brazil's Health Ministry said Monday that more than 460 cases of measles have been confirmed this year in two border states. Authorities are increasing vaccinations in Roraima and...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2018, file photo, LGBT activists shout slogans during a rally against a planned revision to Indonesia's criminal code that would criminalize unmarried and gay sex outside the Parliament in Jakarta, Indonesia. The death of a 20-year-old man with HIV who died after "effectively committed suicide" by stopping anti-viral medication is a sign of an out of control but little acknowledged epidemic of HIV among gay men in Indonesia that researchers say is now being fueled by a gay hate climate fostered by the country's conservative political and religious leaders. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana, File)
July 02, 2018 - 2:48 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Disowned by his father and ill-equipped to deal with the stigma of HIV/AIDS, a young man who died in the central Indonesian city of Yogyakarta early this year had "effectively committed suicide" by stopping anti-viral medication, according to a doctor familiar with the...
Read More
This Aug. 8, 2013 photo provided by Duke University shows Dr. Matthias Gromeier at his laboratory at Duke in Durham, N.C. Gromeier developed a modified poliovirus to attack glioblastoma brain tumor cells. One of the world's most dreaded viruses has been turned into an immune system therapy to fight deadly brain tumors. Survival was better than expected for patients in a small study treated with the modified poliovirus, which helped their bodies attack their cancer, doctors reported on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Shawn Rocco/Duke Health via AP)
June 26, 2018 - 10:00 am
One of the world's most dreaded viruses has been turned into a treatment to fight deadly brain tumors. Survival was better than expected for patients in a small study who were given genetically modified poliovirus, which helped their bodies attack the cancer, doctors report. It was the first human...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2018, file photo, a medical assistant at a community health center gives a patient a flu shot in Seattle. A newer kind of flu vaccine worked a little bit better in seniors this past winter than traditional shots, the government reported Wednesday, June 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
June 20, 2018 - 1:41 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A newer kind of flu vaccine worked a little bit better in seniors this past winter than traditional shots, the government reported Wednesday. Overall, flu vaccines barely worked at all in keeping people 65 and older out of the hospital, with roughly 24 percent effectiveness. The...
Read More
In this photo taken Saturday, June 2, 2018, a motorcycle taxi driver carries a passenger through the streets of Mbandaka, Congo. Hundreds are being vaccinated in Congo's deadly Ebola outbreak, but busy taxi drivers who might be ferrying the sick in an infected city of more than 1 million argue they are on the front lines as well and should receive the vaccine. (AP Photo/Sam Mednick)
June 14, 2018 - 5:07 am
MBANDAKA, Congo (AP) — Hundreds of people are being vaccinated in Congo's deadly Ebola outbreak, especially health workers on the front lines of the battle against the disease. But the busy taxi drivers who might be ferrying the sick in an infected city of more than 1 million argue they are on the...
Read More
Nerybelle Perez poses with a portrait of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died inside an ambulance after being turned away from the largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water, days after Hurricane Maria passed, in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, June 7, 2018. Facing at least three lawsuits demanding more data on the death toll, Puerto Rico's government released new information on Tuesday that added detail to the growing consensus that hundreds or even thousands of people died as an indirect result of the storm. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
June 12, 2018 - 7:29 pm
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Eight days after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, Efrain Perez felt a pain in his chest. Doctors near his small town sent him to Puerto Rico's main hospital for emergency surgery for an aortic aneurysm. But when the ambulance pulled into the parking lot in the...
Read More
FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018 file photo, a nurse prepares a flu shot in Atlanta. On Friday, June 8, 2018, health officials said the flu killed more children in the past year that during any other regular flu season in recent history. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
June 08, 2018 - 1:44 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Flu killed more children in the past year than during any other regular flu season in recent history. Health officials said Friday that they had received reports of 172 pediatric flu deaths since October. That surpasses the 2012-2013 flu season, when there were 171. An average...
Read More

Pages