Human welfare

Migrants, who are part of a caravan of Central American migrants slowly makes its way toward the U.S. border, rest on the rails in Arriaga, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 26, 2018. Many migrants said they felt safer traveling and sleeping with several thousand strangers in unknown towns than hiring a smuggler or trying to make the trip alone. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
October 27, 2018 - 12:06 am
ARRIAGA, Mexico (AP) — Several thousand Central American migrants turned down a Mexican offer of benefits if they applied for refugee status and stayed in the country's two southernmost states, vowing to set out before dawn Saturday to continue their long trek toward the U.S. border. Mexican...
Read More
Central American migrants traveling with a caravan to the U.S. make their way to Pijijiapan, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 25, 2018. There are a relatively tiny number of Nicaraguans who decided to try their luck with the caravan of thousands of Central Americans, mostly Hondurans, currently making its way through southern Mexico. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
October 25, 2018 - 4:09 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — There are a relatively tiny number of Nicaraguans who decided to try their luck with the caravan of thousands of Central Americans, mostly Hondurans, currently making its way through southern Mexico. Nicaraguans represent a small minority of the many migrants who cross through...
Read More
In this Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018 photo, Borey Ai poses for a photo outside of the Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Asian Law Caucus in San Francisco. Ai spent 19 years in prison before parole officials decided he'd turned his life around and he walked out of San Quentin and into the waiting arms of federal immigration agents. California Gov. Jerry Brown is weighing a pardon for the Cambodian refugee who was 14 when he killed a shopkeeper during a robbery that netted about $300. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
October 25, 2018 - 2:36 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — By his own account, Borey Ai was a 14-year-old gangster when he killed a woman during a robbery that netted about $300. He spent 19 years in prison before parole officials decided he had turned his life around. He walked out of San Quentin prison in November 2016 and into...
Read More
In this Oct. 23, 2018 image, a woman hands over her documents as her number is called to cross the border and request asylum in the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico. The first obstacle that migrants in a giant caravan may face if they reach the U.S. border is a long wait in Mexico. To enter through San Diego, the wait in Mexico is a month or longer. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
October 25, 2018 - 1:43 pm
TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) — A woman arrived just after sunrise at the Mexican entrance to the busiest border crossing into the U.S. and was quickly surrounded by nearly 100 migrants. She opened a tattered, hardcover notebook bound with silver duct tape and began shouting out numbers from a handwritten...
Read More
Honduran migrant Alba Rosa Chinchilla Ortiz poses for photos at a temporary shelter in the central park of Huixtla, Mexico, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Chinchilla's husband, an ex-soldier in the Honduran army has survived three attempts to kill him, Chinchilla said. Her partner of six years, he has applied for asylum in the United States and she's trying to join him and their son. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
October 24, 2018 - 10:10 pm
HUIXTLA, Mexico (AP) — A deportee from the United States trying to get back to the life he spent more than a decade building. A woman whose soldier husband already is in the U.S. with their 4-year-old son. A teenager desperate to earn money to support his diabetic mother back home. The caravan of...
Read More
President Donald Trump holds a pen up after signing bipartisan legislation to confront the opioid crisis in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 24, 2018 - 4:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump pledged on Wednesday to put an "extremely big dent" in the scourge of drug addiction in America as he signed legislation intended to help tackle the opioid crisis, the deadliest epidemic of overdoses in the country's history. Nearly 48,000 people died last...
Read More
FILE - This undated photo provided by Stephanie Moyer shows Moyer's daughter Victoria "Tori" Herr. A small Pennsylvania County will pay nearly $5 million to the family of the teenager who collapsed and died in 2015 after four days suffering from heroin withdrawal in jail. The family’s lawyer said jail staff ignored her dire medical needs for days and then lied about it. (Stephanie Moyer via AP, File)
October 24, 2018 - 4:40 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A small Pennsylvania county will pay nearly $5 million to the family of a teenager who collapsed and died after four days of heroin withdrawal in jail. The family's lawyer said jail staff ignored her dire medical needs for days and then lied about it. Victoria "Tori" Herr, 18,...
Read More
In this Oct. 24, 2018 photo publicly provided by the Museum of the former Nazi German death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau is seen the wood-and-ivory baton of Franciszek Nierychlo, Auschwitz prisoner and controversial organizer and first conductor of the inmates' orchestra, in Oswiecim, Poland. The band was ironically designed by the Nazis as a diversion for the cruelly-treated prisoners, but it also helped protect its musicians. The baton was recently obtained by the museum from a private person. (Museum of the former Nazi German death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau/Marcin Inglot via AP)
October 24, 2018 - 2:42 pm
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — The Auschwitz museum has obtained a new relic from the death camp that Nazi Germany operated during World War II: the baton of the inmate orchestra's conductor. The 32-centimeter (13-inch) wood-and-ivory baton with a plaque reading "F. Nierychlo 1940 (A)" was obtained from a...
Read More
October 24, 2018 - 10:14 am
A U.S. advisory committee is recommending routine hepatitis A vaccinations for homeless people, following an increase in outbreaks of the contagious liver disease. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made the recommendation at a meeting Wednesday in Atlanta. Homeless encampments can...
Read More
FILE - In this June 22, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump listens during an event on immigration alongside family members affected by crime committed by undocumented immigrants, at the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex in Washington. Federal immigration and health officials were blindsided by President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy on migrants crossing the southwest border, triggering a cascade of problems as agencies struggled with the fallout from family separations, congressional investigators said in a critical report issued Wednesday. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 24, 2018 - 8:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal immigration and health officials were blindsided by President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" policy on migrants crossing the southwest border, triggering a cascade of problems as agencies struggled with the fallout from family separations, congressional investigators said...
Read More

Pages