Heart health

In this Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019 photo, Javier Rodriguez and Crystal Cuevas Rodriguez and Crystal Cuevas exchange vows during their wedding before family, friends and medical staff in the chapel at the University of Chicago Medical Center for Care and Discovery in Chicago. Rodriguez, 23, who received two heart transplants as a teenager died in hospice care, days after he married his high school sweetheart, his new bride said. (Brian Cassella/Chicago Tribune via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
December 05, 2019 - 3:40 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A 23-year-old Chicago man who received two heart transplants as a teenager died in hospice care, days after he married his high school sweetheart, his new bride said. Javier Rodriguez was diagnosed in seventh grade with dilated cardiomyopathy, a genetic disease that predisposes...
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FILE - This May 26, 2009 file photo shows a printout from an electrocardiogram machine in Missouri. Doctors are reporting that novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Gene-targeting medicines also showed promise in studies discussed Monday, Nov. 18, 2019, at an American Heart Association conference in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 18, 2019 - 3:26 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Several experimental drugs also showed early promise for...
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In this Feb. 16, 2017 file photo, surgeons perform a non-emergency angioplasty at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Through a blood vessel in the groin, a tube is guided to a blockage in the heart. A tiny balloon is then inflated to flatten the clog, and a mesh tube called a stent is inserted to prop the artery open. According to a federally funded study released on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019, people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 16, 2019 - 2:01 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A large study finds that people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by Amarin in November 2018 shows a capsule of the purified, prescription fish oil Vascepa. On Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, government health advisers recommended broader use of the prescription-strength fish oil drug to prevent heart attack, stroke and other life-threatening health problems. (Amarin via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 14, 2019 - 4:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health advisers are recommending broader use of a prescription-strength fish oil drug to help prevent heart problems. The non-binding recommendation paves the way for the Food and Drug Administration to expand the drug’s approval. That broader use could translate into...
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FILE - This June 14, 2011, file photo, shows the pills of the drug Lipitor in Willingboro, N.J. Researchers examined records of people taking cholesterol-lowering medicine between 2005 and 2016, a few years after a big change in treatment guidelines. They found encouraging drops, suggesting the change may be paying off. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 11, 2019 - 2:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Here's some good health news: Cholesterol levels are dropping in the U.S. Researchers examined records of people taking cholesterol-lowering medicine between 2005 and 2016, a few years after a big change in treatment guidelines. They found encouraging declines, suggesting the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018 file photo, a pedestrian is silhouetted against wet pavement in Kansas City, Mo. In a first-of-its-kind report released Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that millions of cases of heart disease and other illnesses can be linked to abuse and other physical and psychological harm that patients suffered as children. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 05, 2019 - 8:12 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials estimate that millions of cases of heart disease and other illnesses are linked to abuse and other physical and psychological harm suffered early in life. In a report released Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tried to estimate the impact...
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Johnny Lopez
November 05, 2019 - 9:15 am
Krystle Evans thought her unborn twins were putting pressure on her ribs when she experienced extreme shortness of breath during the eighth month of her pregnancy. After twenty minutes, the pain subsided and everything appeared to be back to normal. But she knew something was up when it happened...
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November 04, 2019 - 5:54 am
Office workers bemoan driving home in the dark. Night owls relish the chance to sleep in. As clocks tick toward the end of daylight saving time, many sleep scientists and circadian biologists are pushing for a permanent ban because of potential ill effects on human health. Losing an hour of...
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In this Thursday, July 25, 2019 photo, workers at the Electric Time Company in Medfield, Mass., test a 20 foot high clock, built for the a new train station in Bangkok, Thailand, prior to packing and shipment. The clock features a "9" in Thai number script. Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019, when clocks are set back one hour. Losing an hour of daylight sounds like a gloomy preview for the dark winter months, and at least one study found an increase in people seeking help for depression after turning the clocks back to standard time in November _ in Scandinavia. But far more research says that the springtime start of daylight saving time may be more harmful, linking it with more car accidents, heart attacks in vulnerable people and other health problems that may persist throughout the time change. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 31, 2019 - 2:24 pm
Office workers bemoan driving home in the dark. Night owls relish the chance to sleep in. As clocks tick toward the end of daylight saving time, many sleep scientists and circadian biologists are pushing for a permanent ban because of potential ill effects on human health. Losing an hour of...
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This combination of undated photos provided by the family in October 2019 shows Faith Newsome before and after gastric bypass surgery. At 5 feet, 8 inches and 273 pounds, her BMI was almost 42 and she had high blood pressure and prediabetes when she had the procedure at age 16. After about a year, she’d shed 100 pounds and those health problems disappeared. She slimmed down enough to become active in sports, shop for prom dresses and gain a better self-image. But to avoid malnutrition she takes vitamins, must eat small meals and gets sick if she eats foods high in fat or sugar. (Family photos via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 27, 2019 - 11:38 am
Even some severely obese preteens should be considered for weight loss surgery, according to new recommendations. The guidance issued Sunday by the American Academy of Pediatrics is based on a review of medical evidence, including several studies showing that surgery in teens can result in marked...
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