Hate crimes

A makeshift memorial for Elijah Al-Amin is set up at a local Circle K store for the death of the stabbing victim Tuesday, July 9, 2019, in Peoria, Ariz. Peoria police arrested 27-year-old Michael Adams on suspicion of first-degree murder in the killing of 17-year-old Al-Amin, who was stabbed in his throat and back inside the store on July 4. Hundreds of people including a presidential candidate are speaking out on Twitter about the killing of a 17-year-old Muslim youth at a suburban convenience store by a white man who said he was threatened by the boy's rap music. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
July 10, 2019 - 10:31 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Hundreds of people including a presidential candidate spoke out on Twitter this week after a 17-year-old black youth was killed at suburban convenience store, allegedly by a white man charged Tuesday with first-degree murder who has said he felt threatened by the boy's rap music...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail shows Christopher Cantwell. Attorneys who filed a federal civil rights lawsuit in connection with a violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville , Virginia, have asked a judge to order Cantwell, one of the men who participated in the violence to stop making "unlawful threats" against the plaintiffs and their lead attorney. In a motion filed Tuesday, July 2, 2019, lawyers for 10 people who were hurt during two days of violence in August 2017 said Christopher Cantwell recently focused "his hateful rhetoric" on attorney Roberta Kaplan (Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP, File)
July 02, 2019 - 4:34 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Attorneys who filed a federal civil rights lawsuit in connection with a violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, asked a judge Tuesday to order one of the men who participated in the violence to stop making "unlawful threats" against the plaintiffs and...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail shows James Alex Fields Jr. A sentencing hearing has been moved up for the self-avowed white supremacist convicted of federal hate crimes for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Virginia. Fields was originally scheduled to be sentenced July 3, 2019. A notice filed in court says the hearing has been moved to June 28. (Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP, File)
June 28, 2019 - 9:18 pm
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — The Latest on the sentencing of a man who deliberately drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters at a white nationalist rally (all times local): 5 p.m. A Department of Justice official has condemned the violence committed by a white supremacist who was sentenced to...
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Susan Bro, center, mother of Heather Heyer who was killed in 2017 during a white supremacist rally, Gets a hug from a supporter after the sentencing of James Alex Fields Jr. in federal court in Charlottesville, Va., Friday, June 28, 2019. Fields was sentenced to life in prison for his role in a car attack during a white supremacist rally in 2017. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
June 28, 2019 - 6:31 pm
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — An avowed white supremacist who deliberately drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing a young woman and injuring dozens, apologized to his victims Friday before being sentenced to life in prison on federal hate crime charges. James Alex Fields Jr., of...
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This Jan. 29, 2019, image made from police body cam video provided by the Chicago Police Department purports to show Jussie Smollett, with a white rope wrapped around his neck, talking with police officers in his apartment in Chicago. Chicago police on Monday, June 24, released hundreds of files from the investigation into Smollett's claim he was attacked by two men, including releasing the video footage for the first time of the "Empire" actor wearing the thin white rope wrapped around his neck that he told detectives was a noose. The footage from the Chicago police blurred out Smollett's face because, police explained, he was considered a victim at that point. (Chicago Police Department via AP)
June 25, 2019 - 2:05 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago police on Monday released more than 1,000 files from the investigation into Jussie Smollett's claim he was attacked by two men, including video footage that for the first time shows the "Empire" actor with a thin, white rope wrapped around his neck that he told detectives was...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail shows James Alex Fields Jr. A sentencing hearing has been moved up for the self-avowed white supremacist convicted of federal hate crimes for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Virginia. Fields was originally scheduled to be sentenced July 3, 2019. A notice filed in court says the hearing has been moved to June 28. (Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP, File)
June 23, 2019 - 10:47 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The avowed white supremacist who plowed his car into counterdemonstrators opposing a white nationalist rally in Virginia two years ago, killing one person and injuring dozens, has asked a judge for mercy and a sentence shorter than life in prison. Lawyers for James Alex Fields...
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FILE-In this June 13, 2019 file photo a picture of Walter Luebcke stands behind his coffin during the funeral service in Kassel, Germany. German authorities say they have arrested a 45-year-old man in connection with their investigation into the slaying of a regional official from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party. (Swen Pfoertner/dpa via AP)
June 18, 2019 - 5:15 pm
BERLIN (AP) — The killing of a politician who supported refugees, allegedly carried out by a man with a record of violent hate crimes, is an "alarm signal" that highlights the threat posed by far-right extremism, Germany's top security official said Tuesday. The motive of the 45-year-old German man...
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FILE - In a February 2015 file photo, Namee Barakat hugs a female relative during a news conference in Raleigh, N.C., about the death of his son, Deah, his daughter-in-law and her sister. Barakat said the death penalty "would not be enough" for Craig Hicks, the man charged with murdering the three Muslim students. Hicks is expected to enter a plea Wednesday, June 12, 2019, more than four years after the slayings, which the victims’ families blamed on bigotry.(AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)
June 12, 2019 - 7:47 pm
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Moments after a North Carolina man pleaded guilty to gunning down three Muslim university students, a prosecutor played a cellphone video of the slayings in court Wednesday as one of the victims' relatives fainted, others wept and a man cursed the confessed killer openly. Craig...
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FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2016 file photo, burn victim Anthony Gooden gets help with his injured hand during a break in the trial for Martin Blackwell in Atlanta. Blackwell, who was convicted of throwing scalding water on a Gooden and his boyfriend while they slept, told one of them to “get out of my house with all that gay,” a victim testified, but he couldn’t be charged with a hate crime because the state has no such law. Georgia is one of only four states - along with South Carolina, Wyoming and Arkansas - without an official hate crimes law. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
June 02, 2019 - 9:48 am
ATLANTA (AP) — A Georgia man convicted of throwing scalding water on a sleeping same-sex couple told one of them to "get out of my house with all that gay," a victim testified, yet he couldn't be charged with a hate crime because the state has no such law. Victim Anthony Gooden said in a recent...
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FILE - In this March 26, 2019, file photo, actor Jussie Smollett waves as he leaves Cook County Court after his charges were dropped in Chicago. The release of 460 pages of documents related to the Chicago police investigation of Smollett show detectives were informed a possible deal with the actor was in the works a month before it was announced. The documents released Thursday show detectives leading the investigation into Smollett's claim he was the victim of a hate crime were told by Cook County prosecutors a deal with Smollett was in the works that may include a $10,000 fine and community service. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)
May 31, 2019 - 3:07 am
CHICAGO (AP) — New documents on the Jussie Smollett case released Thursday show that prosecutors told Chicago police detectives that a possible deal with the "Empire" actor was in the works a month before charges against him were dropped. The approximately 460-pages of new documents show detectives...
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