Freshwater pollution

FILE - In this July 26, 2019, file photo, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks during a session at the National Governor's Association conference in Salt Lake City. Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region want candidates in next year's presidential election, including President Trump, to back a plan for protecting their freshwater resources. Led by Whitmer, the governors on Monday, July 29, 2019, proposed a six-point platform that seeks increases in federal spending on water treatment infrastructure and environmental cleanups. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
July 29, 2019 - 2:47 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region Monday urged the candidates in next year's presidential election to support a plan for safeguarding their shared waters by boosting federal spending on treatment plants and environmental cleanups. Led by...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., arrives at a Women of Color roundtable discussion, Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
July 22, 2019 - 10:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Kamala Harris is introducing legislation designed to ensure all Americans, particularly those in at-risk communities, have access to safe, affordable drinking water, the latest response to burgeoning water crises across the country. The California Democrat and presidential...
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FILE - This undated file photo shows Barrick Goldstrike Mines' Betze-Post open pit near Carlin, Nev. A three-judge panel with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled Friday, July 19, 2019, that state and federal programs ensure mining companies take financial responsibility for their pollution. (Adella Harding/The Daily Free Press via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 6:54 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A U.S. appeals court panel sided with the Trump administration Friday in a mining pollution dispute, ruling that state and federal programs already in place ensure that companies take financial responsibility for future cleanups. The ruling came after the administration was...
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This cover image released by Atria Books shows "Exposure: Poisoned Water, Corporate Greed, and One Lawyer’s Twenty-Year Battle Against DuPont" by Robert Bilott, which will release in October. (Atria Books via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 10:13 am
NEW YORK (AP) — A top environmental lawyer, the inspiration for a film starring Mark Ruffalo, has a book coming about his 20-year battle with DuPont. Rob Bilott's "Exposure" is scheduled for release in October. Bilott had been representing corporations when he was contacted in 1998 by a West...
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Water flows through Conowingo Dam, a hydroelectric dam spanning the lower Susquehanna River near Conowingo, Md., on Thursday, May 16, 2019. Officials once counted on the dam to block large amounts of sediment in the Susquehanna from reaching Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, but the reservoir behind the dam has filled with sediment far sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
July 06, 2019 - 9:24 pm
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job of harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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In this June 3, 2017 photo, Dr. Joan Perry of Kinston, left, answers a question during a debate with and state Rep. Greg Murphy, a Greenville physician, in Greenville, N.C. The two Republicans are running in a special primary election to be held July 9 for North Carolina's 3rd Congressional seat. (Deborah Griffin/The Daily Reflector via AP)
July 06, 2019 - 9:53 am
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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Flames and smoke rise from a bourbon warehouse fire at a Jim Beam distillery in Woodford County, Ky., Wednesday, July 3, 2019. Firefighters from four counties responded to the blaze that erupted late Tuesday. (Pat McDonogh/Courier Journal via AP)
July 03, 2019 - 2:48 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A fire destroyed a massive Jim Beam warehouse filled with about 45,000 barrels of bourbon, sending flames shooting into the night sky and generating so much heat that firetruck lights melted, authorities said Wednesday. Firefighters from four counties responded to the blaze...
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Johnny Rowan stands outside Burning River Coffee, Friday, June 14, 2019, in Lakewood, Ohio. Rowan’s is one of 90 active businesses registered with the state that have “burning river” in their names, inspired by the Cuyahoga River’s most famous fire. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
June 18, 2019 - 11:17 am
CLEVELAND (AP) — Fifty years after the Cuyahoga River's most infamous fire helped spawn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, artists and entrepreneurs have turned old jokes into inspiration and forged decades of embarrassment into a fiery brand of Cleveland pride. "Everybody knows Cuyahoga...
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FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2017 file photo, heavy equipment is used at an ash storage site at Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn. The nation’s largest public utility has agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards of coal ash from unlined pits at Gallatin Fossil Plant. In a Thursday, June 13, 2019 settlement, the Tennessee Valley Authority says it will excavate a majority of coal ash at its Gallatin Fossil Plant. .(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
June 13, 2019 - 7:06 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The nation's largest public utility on Thursday agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards (9.2 million cubic meters) of coal ash from unlined pits at a Tennessee coal-burning power plant. Prompted by two environmental groups, the state sued the Tennessee...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Monday, June 3, 2019. The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 03, 2019 - 4:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration found substantial levels of a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to FDA researchers. The FDA's food-test results are likely to...
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