Freedom of speech

1010 WINS Newsroom
December 09, 2019 - 9:43 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday left in place a Kentucky law requiring doctors to perform ultrasounds and show fetal images to patients before abortions. The justices did not comment in refusing to review an appeals court ruling that upheld the law. The American Civil Liberties Union...
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In this Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019 photo, Lebanese anchorwoman Dima Sadek uses her cellphone to film an anti-government protest, in Beirut, Lebanon. Sadek, who last month resigned as an anchorwoman at the LBC TV, blamed Hezbollah supporters for robbing her smartphone while she was filming protests, and said the harassment was followed by insulting and threatening phone calls to her mother, who suffered a stroke as a result of the stress. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
1010 WINS Newsroom
December 07, 2019 - 5:07 am
BEIRUT (AP) — Lebanese journalists are facing threats and wide-ranging harassment in their work — including verbal insults and physical attacks, even death threats — while reporting on nearly 50 days of anti-government protests, despite Lebanon’s reputation as a haven for free speech in a troubled...
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FILE - This Jan. 25, 2010, file photo, shows the United States Department of State seal on a podium at the State Department in Washington. Two organizations of documentary filmmakers filed a federal lawsuit Thursday arguing that new rules requiring U.S. visa applicants to register their social media handles are making them fearful of publicly speaking their minds. State Department rules took effect in May and apply to more than 14 million applicants each year, requiring them to register all their social media handles from the past five years on about 20 different online platforms. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
December 05, 2019 - 4:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Two organizations of documentary filmmakers filed a federal lawsuit Thursday arguing that new rules requiring U.S. visa applicants to register their social media handles are making them fearful of publicly speaking their minds. State Department rules took effect in May and apply...
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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2019 file photo, James Bopp, the attorney for conservative religious groups challenging limits on Indiana's religious objections law, speaks with reporters at the Hamilton County government center in Noblesville, Ind. Conservative religious groups have failed to convince an Indiana judge they've faced any harm from limits placed on the state's contentious religious objections law signed by then-Gov. Mike Pence. Bopp, argued during an October hearing that they were subject to "grotesque stripping" of their religious rights by the Republican-dominated Legislature. (AP Photo/Tom Davies File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 27, 2019 - 1:46 pm
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana judge has canceled a trial challenging limits on the state’s religious objections law, finding conservative groups failed to prove they were harmed by changes the Republican-dominated Legislature approved shortly after then-Gov. Mike Pence signed it. In calling off...
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Polish law professor of international renown, Wojciech Sadurski,right, in courtroom with his attorneys at the opening of a trial in which the ruling party Law and Justice is suing him for defamation over a 2018 tweet in which he called the party an "organized criminal group," at the Provincial Court in Warsaw, Poland, on Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019. Sadurski said he acted in public interest when he expressed his private view that the party's policies break Poland's legal order. The court's verdict is expected Dec. 16. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 27, 2019 - 9:10 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poland’s ruling party is suing a law professor of international renown for defamation over comments he made on Twitter. The case against Wojciech Sadurski, a constitutional law professor who is a vocal critic of Poland’s right-wing government, opened Wednesday in Warsaw’s...
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Roman Sushchenko, a Ukrainian journalist who spent three years in a Russian prison on spying charges, speaks to reporters to described how he would create paintings of cathedrals and other scenes as a way of surviving his imprisonment at a news conference in Warsaw, Poland, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. The Association of Polish Journalists is exhibiting reproductions of his works. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 26, 2019 - 2:07 pm
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — A Ukrainian journalist convicted in Russia of spying and jailed for three years has described how he created paintings of cathedrals, lighthouses and soothing landscapes as a form of psychological therapy during his imprisonment. Roman Sushchenko, who denies spying, said...
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In this Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 photo, Moroccan rapper Abdelkrim Bouhjir, known as Kouz1, performs at a rap concert as part of the Visa for Music festival in Rabat, Morocco. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 25, 2019 - 2:14 am
FES, Morocco (AP) — Moroccan rapper Gnawi knew the police would come, after he and two friends released a unusually outspoken video exposing their country’s problems with migration and drugs and expressing frustration with the king. And sure enough, they did. Gnawi, a former military serviceman...
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People take part in a protest rally against the German far-right party NPD in Hannover, Germany, Saturday, Nov. 23, 2019. Lower Saxony’s governor Stephan Weil asked people to rally against a protest Saturday by the far-right NPD party, which is marching to intimidate journalists who have reported critically about the nationalist party. (Ole Spata/dpa via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 23, 2019 - 9:56 am
BERLIN (AP) — More than 5,000 people followed the call by the governor of a northern German state on Saturday to join rallies against a far-right protest in Hannover. Lower Saxony’s Stephan Weil had asked people to rally against a protest by the far-right NPD party, which is marching to intimidate...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2013 file image made from video and released by WikiLeaks, former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden speaks in Moscow. Snowden says the government is unfairly singling him out in a lawsuit that seeks to block him from profiting off his best-selling memoir. The U.S. says Snowden’s book, “Permanent Record,” violates secrecy agreements he signed when he worked for the CIA and as a contractor for the National Security Agency.(AP Photo, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 20, 2019 - 5:56 pm
FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — Former CIA contractor Edward Snowden says the government is unfairly singling him out in a lawsuit that seeks to block him from profiting off his best-selling memoir. The U.S. says Snowden’s book, “Permanent Record,” violates secrecy agreements he signed when he worked for...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
November 18, 2019 - 1:13 pm
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A Dutch court sentenced a Pakistani man Monday to 10 years in prison for plotting a terror attack on anti-Islam lawmaker Geert Wilders. The 27-year-old man, whose identity was not released by The Hague District Court, was given a higher sentence Monday than the six...
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