Environmental science

FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States and Canada from 1987 to 2006. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
September 20, 2018 - 1:06 am
OXFORD, Pa. (AP) — A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried. Pesky mosquitoes, disease-carrying ticks, crop-munching aphids and cockroaches are doing just fine. But the more beneficial flying insects of summer — native bees, moths,...
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This undated image made available by Frank Peairs in 2007 shows a European corn borer. A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. (Frank Peairs/Colorado State University/Bugwood.org via AP)
August 30, 2018 - 2:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. Insects now consume about 10 percent of the globe's food, but that will increase to 15 to 20 percent by the end of the century if climate change isn't...
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An historic schoolhouse burns as the Carr Fire tears through Shasta, Calif., Thursday, July 26, 2018. Fueled by high temperatures, wind and low humidity, the blaze destroyed multiple homes and at least one historic building. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
July 28, 2018 - 1:04 am
Heat waves are setting all-time temperature records across the globe, again. Europe suffered its deadliest fire in more than a century, and one of nearly 90 large fires in the U.S. West burned dozens of homes and forced the evacuation of at least 37,000 people near Redding, California. Flood-...
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Traffic queue for the Eurotunnel in Folkestone, south east England, Friday July 27, 2018. Britain sweltered through the hottest day of the year Thursday, as an unusual heatwave wreaked havoc on transport and hospitals. The Cross-Channel rail operator cancelled thousands of tickets after "extreme temperatures" caused major disruption to services. (Gareth Fuller/PA via AP)
July 27, 2018 - 11:07 am
BERLIN (AP) — Researchers say heatwaves of the kind currently being seen in northern Europe have become twice as likely due to climate change. Scientists from the World Weather Attribution team said Friday they have compared observations and forecasts for the Netherlands, Denmark and Ireland with...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2017, file photo, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Building is shown in Washington. Democratic lawmakers are joining scientists in denouncing an industry-backed proposal to dramatically limit what kind of science the Environmental Protection Agency can consider. Industry backers say the rule would increase regulatory transparency. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
July 17, 2018 - 12:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic lawmakers joined scores of scientists, health and environmental officials and environmental activists Tuesday in denouncing an industry-backed proposal by the Environmental Protection Agency that could limit dramatically what kind of science the agency considers in...
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CAPTION CORRECTS PHOTOGRAPHER BYLINE In this Thursday, July 12, 2018 photo, a view of an Iceberg, near the village Innarsuit, on the northwestern Greenlandic coast. Scientists have watched an iceberg four miles long break off from a glacier. The iceberg is allegedly grounded on the sea floor. Residents in houses near the shore are prepared for an evacuation. (Magnus Kristensen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
July 13, 2018 - 1:12 pm
LONDON (AP) — An iceberg four miles (six kilometers) wide has broken off from a glacier in eastern Greenland and scientists have captured the dramatic event on video. New York University professor David Holland, an expert in atmospheric and ocean science, told The Associated Press that "this is the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2009, file photo, former-Sen. Tim Wirth moderates the National Clean Energy Summit 2.0, in Las Vegas. Three decades after early warnings about global warming, the issue has become entrenched in the nation’s culture wars. Some in the GOP used to lead the fight against warming. Now most Republicans cannot speak the words “climate change.” Let alone support policies to address it. Many Democrats have moved sharply to the left on environmental issues as well. Climate change is as polarized as abortion. (AP Photo/Eric Jamison, File)
June 20, 2018 - 11:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — When it comes to global warming, America's political climate may have changed more than the Earth's over the past three decades. NASA scientist James Hansen put the world on notice about global warming on June 23, 1988. Looking back, he says: "I was sufficiently idealistic that I...
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FILE – In this Oct. 29, 2008, file photo, a drilling rig used to extract natural gas from the Marcellus Shale, located on a hill above a pond on John Dunn's farm in the Washington County borough of Houston, Pa. New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
June 18, 2018 - 5:57 pm
New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making...
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James Hansen sits for a portrait in his home in New York on April 12, 2018. NASA’s top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would get, depending on emissions of heat-trapping gases. (AP Photo/Marshall Ritzel)
June 18, 2018 - 3:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — James Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't. NASA's top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would...
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FILE - In this Sunday, Nov. 2, 2003 file photo, a coyote wanders through a neighborhood in Cedar Glen, Calif., in the San Bernardino Mountains. Scientists have long known that human activity disrupts nature. And the latest research released on Thursday, June 14, 2018, found fear of humans has caused many species to increase their nighttime activity by 20 percent. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
June 14, 2018 - 3:34 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Lions and tigers and bears are increasingly becoming night owls because of us, a new study says. Scientists have long known that human activity disrupts nature. Besides becoming more vigilant and reducing time spent looking for food, many mammals may travel to remote areas or move...
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