Environmental science

FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, July 25, 2019, a bird sits on a straw bale on a field in Frankfurt, Germany, as the sun rises during an ongoing heatwave in Europe. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday Aug. 15, 2019, that July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, FILE)
August 15, 2019 - 12:39 pm
BERLIN (AP) — July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880, the latest in a long line of peaks that scientists say backs up predictions for man-made climate change. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday that July was 0.95 degrees Celsius...
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Kai Frazier and Chance Seawright, brothers visiting from Aiken, South Carolina, cool off while playing in the Fountain of Rings in Centennial Olympic Park, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Andrea Smith)
August 12, 2019 - 7:45 pm
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Forecasters are warning about days of scorching, dangerous heat gripping a wide swath of the U.S. South and Midwest, where the heat index on Monday eclipsed 120 degrees (48.9 Celsius) in one town and climbed nearly that high in others. With temperatures around 100 degrees (...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread far and wide. Some experts have questioned whether there’s enough plankton in the lake to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. But the new report released Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, by University of Michigan scientists says despite a drop-off of plankton caused by exotic mussels, the voracious carp could feed on other organic material when venturing into deeper waters. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
August 12, 2019 - 2:42 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Asian carp are likely to find enough food to spread farther if they establish breeding populations in Lake Michigan, reinforcing the importance of preventing the invasive fish from gaining a foothold, scientists said in a paper released Monday. A study led by University...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 9:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a new United Nations report on climate change (all times local): 3:10 p.m. A manager in the U.N. Climate Change secretariat who helped write a new report on the subject, said the grueling work by the volunteer authors was "like a dentist's appointment for six days"...
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People enjoy the sun and the fountains of the Trocadero gardens in Paris, Thursday July 25, 2019, when a new all-time high temperature of 42.6 degrees Celsius (108.7 F) hit the French capital. (AP Photo/Rafael Yaghobzadeh)
August 02, 2019 - 9:20 am
AMSTERDAM (AP) — The heat wave that smashed temperature records in Western Europe last month was made more likely and intensified by man-made climate change, according to a study published Friday. The rapid study by a respected team of European scientists should be a warning of things to come, the...
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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, centre, arrives for a meeting in the French National Assembly, in Paris, France, Tuesdays, July 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Rafael Yaghobzadeh )
July 23, 2019 - 11:15 am
PARIS (AP) — Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg has told lawmakers at France's lower house of parliament that they need to listen to scientists on the issue of climate change and act now to avert a catastrophe. Thunberg spoke Tuesday in a conference room, invited by lawmakers from several...
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In this 2018 photo, a Twin Otter aircraft flies over New York Harbor and New York City on a research mission. In older Eastern US cities, nine times as much natural gas is leaking out of pipelines, homes than federal government had thought. NOAA's airplane sees much more methane coming out of New York City, Washington, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Providence than EPA had figured. Scientists said Monday, July 22, 2019, it isn’t a safety problem, but it is a climate change issue. Fixing those leaks can help in the fight against global warming. (Eric Kort/University of Michigan via AP)
July 22, 2019 - 5:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Older U.S. east coast cities are leaking nine times as much natural gas into the air — from homes or pipes heading into houses — than the federal government had thought, a new airborne monitoring study finds. It's probably not a safety problem because what's coming out doesn't...
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Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 14, 2019 - 9:58 am
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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President Donald Trump pauses as he speaks during an event about the environment in the East Room of the White House, Monday, July 8, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
July 08, 2019 - 6:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared himself a champion of the environment Monday, working to boost his standing on climate change and pollution issues in advance of the 2020 election despite having launched some of the most sweeping rollbacks in air, water and other protections in...
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The German Arctic research vessel Polarstern is docked for maintenance in Bremerhaven, Germany, Wednesday, July 3, 2019. Scientists from 17 nations are preparing for a year-long mission to the central Arctic to study the impact that climate change is having on the frigid far north of the planet. Mission leader Markus Rex said that researchers plan to anchor the German icebreaker RV Polarstern to a large floe and set up camp on the ice as the sea freezes around them, conducting experiments throughout the Arctic winter. (AP Photos/Frank Jordans)
July 03, 2019 - 6:41 pm
BREMERHAVEN, Germany (AP) — Cranes hoist cargo onto the deck, power tools scream out and workers bustle through the maze of passageways inside the German icebreaker RV Polarstern, preparations for a yearlong voyage that organizers say is unprecedented in scale and ambition. In a couple of months,...
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