Environmental science

In this May 10, 2019 photo, grain bins belonging to Brett Adams are surrounded by flood waters, in Peru, Neb. Adams had thousands of acres under water, about 80 percent of his land, this year. The water split open his grain bins and submerged his parents' house and other buildings when the levee protecting the farm broke. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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December 11, 2019 - 1:24 pm
CRESCENT, Iowa (AP) — Frogs, carp and bugs thrived all summer in murky floodwaters where Gene Walter should have planted corn and soybeans. Last year’s ruined crop spilled from metal storage bins that burst nine months ago when the Missouri River surged through two levees near his southwest Iowa...
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In this Nov. 27, 2019, photo, Georgia Tech professor Kim Cobb poses for a photo at her home in Atlanta. Some climate scientists and activists, including Cobb, are limiting their flying, their consumption of meat and their overall carbon footprints to avoid adding to the global warming they study. (AP Photo/John Amis)
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December 08, 2019 - 3:01 pm
For years, Kim Cobb was the Indiana Jones of climate science. The Georgia Tech professor flew to the caves of Borneo to study ancient and current climate conditions. She jetted to a remote South Pacific island to see the effects of warming on coral. Add to that flights to Paris, Rome, Vancouver and...
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December 04, 2019 - 12:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The computer models used to simulate what heat-trapping gases will do to global temperatures have been pretty spot-on in their predictions, a new study found. After years of hearing critics blast the models' accuracy, climate scientist Zeke Hausfather decided to see just how good...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, apparently confirming fears about the invaders' threat to native species, according to a newly released study. Analysis of more than 20 years of population data suggests the carp are out-competing fish prized by anglers, such as yellow perch, bluegill, and black and white crappie, the report said. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
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November 16, 2019 - 11:16 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A new study says sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp. The study’s lead author says it’s among the first to establish a solid link between the presence of invasive carp and a drop-off of native species...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
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October 29, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Chris Lene sweeps water out of one of the businesses in the building he owns that was flooded by rainwater in Sacramento, Calif. Climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet, according a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
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October 21, 2019 - 3:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet. Scientists looked at 33 El Ninos since 1901. This natural weather phenomenon is the warming of equatorial Pacific that triggers weather extremes...
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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg pulls her speech out of a pocket as she steps up to speak to several thousand people at a climate strike rally Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Denver. The rally was staged in Denver's Civic Center Park. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
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October 11, 2019 - 9:07 pm
DENVER (AP) — Young people must be prepared to continue striking to call for action on climate change for a long time and not back down, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg told a climate strike rally in Denver on Friday. Thunberg said she and fellow youth activists won't beg those in power to...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
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October 11, 2019 - 7:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down power...
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October 01, 2019 - 12:53 pm
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish prosecutors on Tuesday pressed animal cruelty charges against the owner of a herd of goats, some of whom died on an island in Warsaw. Some 60 goats and sheep from a private farm had been sent to an island on the Vistula River last year to help control its lush grass and...
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The German icebreaker and research vessel Polarstern at shore in Tromso, Norway, Wednesday Sept. 19, 2019. Scientists from more than a dozen nations are preparing to launch the biggest and most complex research expedition ever attempted in the central Arctic. About 100 researchers will set sail Friday from Tromso, Norway, aboard the German icebreaker Polarstern in an effort to understand how climate change is affecting the Arctic and regions beyond. (Rune Stoltz Bertinussen/NTB Scanpix via AP)
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September 20, 2019 - 6:17 am
BERLIN (AP) — Researchers from more than a dozen nations prepared Friday to launch the biggest and most complex expedition ever attempted in the central Arctic — a yearlong journey through the ice they hope will improve the scientific models that underpin our understanding of climate change. The...
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