Electric utilities

FILE- In this June 21, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington. Pruitt, a former Oklahoma state senator and two-term Republican attorney general, resigned suddenly Thursday, July 5, amid ethics investigations, including ones examining his lavish spending on first-class airline seats and a $43,000 soundproof booth for making private phone calls. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 06, 2018 - 1:44 pm
As head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt tried to roll back rules affecting many industries, but whether he made lasting changes in the government's regulation of business or failed to leave a legacy could be decided in the courts. Pruitt tried to reverse efforts to cut...
Read More
Seen in this 2017 photo, Drew Wynne who quit his job in 2016 to pursue a career manufacturing cold-brew coffee died in October 2017 after using a paint stripper at the business in Charleston, S.C. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt had put on hold the Obama administration’s attempt to ban consumer sales of paint strippers containing the compound methylene chloride. But he reversed course in May after meeting with families of men who died after using paint stripper. Brian Wynne, brother of Drew, believes, methylene chloride may already have been out of stores by fall 2017, when his brother was found dead at the business, killed by methylene chloride, according to coroners. (Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier via AP)
July 06, 2018 - 1:32 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — For 37 mostly female farm-workers in California's Central Valley, U.S. policy under Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt became personal not long after sunup one day in May 2017. Picking cabbage that morning, the workers noticed a tarry smell drifting from a nearby...
Read More
In this photo released by Greenpeace, a drone resembling the character of Superman flies over the nuclear power plant of Le Bugey, central, France, Tuesday, July 3, 2018. The environmental activist group says the drone was harmless but the action showed the lack of security in nuclear installations in France, which is heavily dependent on atomic power. (Nicolas Chauveau/Greenpeace via AP)
July 03, 2018 - 9:52 am
PARIS (AP) — Greenpeace activists say they have crashed two remote-controlled aircraft — a drone and a tiny radio-controlled plane — into a French nuclear plant to highlight the lack of security around the facility. The drone, which was decorated like a miniature Superman, slammed into the tower in...
Read More
FILE - This July 12, 1972 file photo shows the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in Lacey Township, N.J. Federal regulators say America’s oldest nuclear power plant will shut down Sept. 17, 2018, and plans to have its reactor fuel placed into dry storage within about six years. But the Oyster Creek plant, which opened in 1969, will remain in Lacey Township, New Jersey, until nearly the end of this century. (AP Photo, File)
July 02, 2018 - 12:44 pm
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — America's oldest nuclear power plant will shut down on Sept. 17, but the Oyster Creek plant near the New Jersey shore will stay right where it is for the next 60 years. Officials with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission held a briefing Monday on shutdown plans for...
Read More
FILE- In this Jan. 16, 2018, file photo, the General Electric logo is displayed at the top of their Global Operations Center in the Banks development of downtown Cincinnati. A year after taking over an ailing American conglomerate, CEO John Flannery is calving off larger chunks of General Electric, spinning off its health care business and selling its stake in the oil services company, Baker Hughes. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
June 26, 2018 - 6:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — General Electric Co. is shrinking again, becoming a mere shadow of the globe-spanning conglomerate that it was before the Great Recession. GE said Tuesday that it will spin off its health-care business and sell its interest in Baker Hughes, which provides drilling services to oil...
Read More
People are reflected on the electronic board of a securities firm in Tokyo, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Asian markets were mostly lower on Tuesday, as moves by the U.S to gain an upper hand on trade with China weighed on the technology sector. Tech stocks have been the pillar of the Wall Street's long-running bull market. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
June 26, 2018 - 7:25 am
SINGAPORE (AP) — Global markets were mixed Tuesday as traders monitored U.S. efforts to gain an upper hand in trade with China, particularly in the technology sector. Shanghai's index entered bear market territory, having dropped over 20 percent from a recent high in January. KEEPING SCORE: Germany...
Read More
June 24, 2018 - 8:26 am
CAIRO (AP) — Libya's U.N.-backed government in Tripoli says three Turkish workers who were kidnapped last year in a southern Libyan town have been released. The government said late Saturday the workers would be flown back to Turkey from the capital Tripoli. The hostages were working for the...
Read More
June 18, 2018 - 6:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday approved the first state permit program for disposal of toxic ash from coal plants, a switch from federal oversight that the coal industry had sought. Coal ash is the residue left after burning coal to generate power. Decades of coal...
Read More
Two 464-foot-tall cooling towers of the St. Johns River Power Park on Jacksonville, Florida's Northside are simultaneously imploded Saturday, June 16, 2018, as part of the demolition of the now closed coal fired power plant operated by the Jacksonville Electrical Authority. (Bob Self/The Florida Times-Union via AP)
June 16, 2018 - 12:34 pm
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Two cooling towers - both well over the length of a football field - came tumbling down in seconds Saturday in Florida as part of an effort to dismantle a power plant. The identical, 462-foot towers were imploded at St. Johns River Power Park in Jacksonville. After...
Read More
Women interact near a robot designed by Chinese robotics company Pangolin at the Consumer Electronics Show Asia 2018 in Shanghai, China on Friday, June 15, 2018. President Donald Trump is hiking the price of Chinese-made forklift trucks and X-ray machines for American buyers. They are part of a $50 billion list of Chinese exports targeted for a 25 percent tariff hike in response to complaints Beijing steals or pressures foreign companies to hand over technology. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
June 16, 2018 - 5:48 am
BEIJING (AP) — China fired back Saturday in a spiraling trade dispute with President Donald Trump by raising import duties on a $34 billion list of American goods including soybeans, electric cars and whiskey. The government said it was responding in "equal scale" to Trump's tariff hike on Chinese...
Read More

Pages