Earth science

In this undated photo, two men look down a shaft in Kaktovik, Alaska, leading to a new community ice cellar, a type of underground food cache dug into the permafrost to provide natural refrigeration used for generations in far-north communities. Naturally cooled underground ice cellars, used in Alaska Native communities for generations, are becoming increasingly unreliable as a warming climate and other factors touch multiple facets of life in the far north. (Marnie Isaacs/Kaktovik Community Foundation via AP)
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November 25, 2019 - 1:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — For generations, people in Alaska’s far-north villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their whale and walrus meat to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Scores of the naturally refrigerated food caches lie beneath...
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In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
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November 19, 2019 - 5:58 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
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November 18, 2019 - 3:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The worsening wildfires, floods and hurricanes of climate change threaten at least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites, and efforts to strengthen the hazardous waste sites are stalling in some vulnerable regions as the Trump administration plays down the threat, a congressional watchdog...
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A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
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November 15, 2019 - 4:46 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water...
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FILE - In this April 12, 2019, file photo, Sidney Draughon holds a sign as she takes part in a protest in Provo, Utah, against how the Brigham Young University Honor Code Office investigates and disciplines students. Two well-known scientific groups have dropped job postings from their websites from Brigham Young University, the Salt Lake Tribune reported Monday, Nov. 11, 2019, because of the school's LGBTQ policies, igniting a debate on whether research organizations should take a stance on social issues. Both groups say the ads require applicants to abide by the school's honor code, which includes a ban on homosexual behavior. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
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November 11, 2019 - 3:35 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Two well-known scientific groups have dropped job postings from their websites from Brigham Young University because of the school's LGBTQ policies, igniting a debate on whether research organizations should take a stance on social issues. The Washington-based American...
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FILE - In a Aug. 30, 2005 file photo, floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina fill the streets near downtown New Orleans. The most destructive U.S. hurricanes are hitting three times more frequently than they did a century ago, a new study by a Danish research team said Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
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November 11, 2019 - 3:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Big, destructive hurricanes are hitting the U.S. three times more frequently than they did a century ago, according to a new study. Experts generally measure a hurricane's destruction by adding up how much damage it did to people and cities. That can overlook storms that are...
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Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks after a climate change march in Los Angeles, on Friday, Nov. 1, 2019. Thunberg says young people are rallying to fight climate change because their age leaves them with the most to lose from damage to the planet. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
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November 02, 2019 - 9:41 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Greta Thunberg, Sweden's 16-year-old climate-change activist, joined fellow teenagers from throughout California Friday in telling a cheering crowd of hundreds at a Los Angeles rally that they can and will fight to save their planet from global warming. Thunberg, who has been...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
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October 29, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Chris Lene sweeps water out of one of the businesses in the building he owns that was flooded by rainwater in Sacramento, Calif. Climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet, according a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
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October 21, 2019 - 3:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet. Scientists looked at 33 El Ninos since 1901. This natural weather phenomenon is the warming of equatorial Pacific that triggers weather extremes...
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A sign, part of a public design installation by artist Thomas Starr, is displayed on a gazebo outside the University of New Hampshire boathouse in Durham, N.H., Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019. Starr, a graphic and information design professor from Boston's Northeastern University, created the project to address possible effects of climate change. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
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October 19, 2019 - 9:46 am
DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — A public arts project in New England communities features signs that imagine the possible future effects of climate change to raise awareness about the issue. The "Remembrance of Climate Futures" project has been installed in Durham, New Hampshire, and Essex, Massachusetts. It...
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