Diagnosis and treatment

1010 WINS Newsroom
May 19, 2020 - 2:10 pm
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Republican congressman from Kansas who is also a doctor says he has been taking a malaria drug being touted by President Donald Trump as way to protect against the coronavirus, despite warnings that it could have potentially fatal side effects. U.S. Rep. Roger Marshall,...
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President Donald Trump tells reporters that he is taking zinc and hydroxychloroquine during a meeting with restaurant industry executives about the coronavirus response, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Monday, May 18, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 18, 2020 - 10:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday that he is taking a malaria drug to protect against the coronavirus, despite warnings from his own government that it should only be administered for COVID-19 in a hospital or research setting due to potentially fatal side effects. Trump told...
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Dermatologist Dr. Seemal Desai poses for a photo in an examination room in his office in Plano, Texas, Thursday, May 7, 2020. Desai uses the privacy of an examination room and a tablet computer to virtually visit with some of his patients. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 18, 2020 - 1:03 pm
The global coronavirus pandemic has created a huge need for health care in the U.S., but it also is delivering a devastating financial blow to that sector. COVID-19 worries have kept patients away from doctors' offices and forced the postponement and cancellation of non-urgent surgeries. The...
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Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie speaks about protecting seniors, in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, April 30, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 16, 2020 - 12:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing growing criticism, the Department of Veterans Affairs said Friday that it will not halt use of an unproven malaria drug on veterans with COVID-19 but that fewer of its patients are now taking it. In responses provided to Congress and obtained by The Associated Press, the VA...
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The logo and building of the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, 15 April 2020. US President Donald Trump announced that he has instructed his administration to halt funding to the WHO. The American president criticizes the World Health Organization for its mismanagement of the Coronavirus pandemic Covid-19. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 15, 2020 - 5:19 pm
GENEVA (AP) — Costa Rica’s president said Friday that COVID-19 can only be defeated if countries shun nationalism and aren’t “selfish,” urging access to diagnostics and treatment tools for everyone as a major meeting of the World Health Organization’s membership looms next week. Carlos Alvarado...
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Jason Antos, an Advanced EMT for Rescue Inc., puts a COVID-19 testing swab up the nasal passage of Anya Wolfe, of Wardsboro, Vt., during a pop-up COVID-19 testing clinic at the Brattleboro Union High School's parking lot in Brattleboro, Vt., Thursday, May 14, 2020. The clinics are part of the state's efforts to ramp up testing and prevent the spread of COVID-19. (Kristopher Radder/The Brattleboro Reformer via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 14, 2020 - 10:26 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — From a hospital on the edge of the Navajo Nation to the suburbs of the nation’s capital, front-line medical workers in coronavirus hot spots are struggling to keep up with a crushing load of patients while lockdown restrictions are lifting in many other parts of the U.S...
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Richard Bright, former director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, arrives for a House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health hearing to discuss protecting scientific integrity in response to the coronavirus outbreak, Thursday, May 14, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Greg Nash/Pool via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 14, 2020 - 4:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite White House claims, the U.S. still lacks a comprehensive battle plan against the coronavirus in critical areas including masks, testing, treatments and vaccines, whistleblower Rick Bright warned Thursday in testimony before a House committee. “Our window of opportunity is...
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FILE - In this April 27, 2015 file photo, Cassandra Callender, arrives home with her mother in Windsor Locks, Conn., for the first time since December after a court-ordered chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Callender has died after a five-year battle with the disease, her mother said Thursday, May 14. She was 22. (Stephen Dunn/Hartford Courant via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 14, 2020 - 2:29 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Cassandra Callender, who was forced by Connecticut courts as a teenager to undergo chemotherapy for cancer, has died after a five-year battle with the disease, her mother said Thursday. She was 22. Callender, of Windsor Locks, died Tuesday at home, where she had been in...
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FILE - In this March 16, 2020 file photo, a patient receives a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. In a press briefing on Thursday May 14, 2020, the European Medicines Agency predicted that there could be licensed drugs to treat the new coronavirus in the next few months and that a vaccine might even be approved in early 2021, in a “best-case scenario.” (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 14, 2020 - 7:19 am
LONDON (AP) — The European Medicines Agency predicted that there could be licensed drugs to treat the new coronavirus in the next few months and that a vaccine might even be approved in early 2021, in a “best-case scenario.” Dr. Marco Cavaleri, who heads the European regulator’s vaccines department...
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FILE - This file image provided by The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows SARS-CoV-2 (orange) the virus that causes COVID-19—isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells (green) cultured in the lab. A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work. But the first so-called antigen test _ announced Saturday, may 9, 2020 by the Food and Drug Administration _ is not quite the kind sought by top government health officials. It is less accurate than the current gold standard for testing and can only be run on specialized equipment. (NIAID-RML via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 12, 2020 - 4:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work. But the first so-called antigen test — announced Saturday...
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