Demographics

FILE - In a Thursday, July 4, 2019 file photo, Vice President Mike Pence, center, his wife Karen Pence, pose for a group photo with new naturalized citizens following a naturalization ceremony at the National Archives in Washington. Almost half of the foreign-born who moved to the U.S. in the past decade were college-educated, a level of education greatly exceeding immigrants from previous decades, as the arrival of highly skilled workers supplanted workers in fields like construction that shrunk after the Great Recession. New figures released this week by the U.S. Census Bureau show that 47% of the foreign-born population who arrived in the U.S. from 2010 to 2019 had a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to 36% of native-born Americans and 31% of the foreign-born population who entered the country in or before 2009. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
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March 31, 2020 - 1:32 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Almost half of the foreign-born who moved to the U.S. in the past decade were college-educated, a level of education greatly exceeding immigrants from previous decades, as the arrival of highly skilled workers supplanted workers in fields like construction that shrunk after the...
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This undated photo provided by Jasmine Cho, who was supposed to lead cookie decorating activities at Census events in Pittsburgh in March and April, shows cookies she decorated with U.S. Census themes. The spread of the novel coronavirus has waylaid 2020 census outreach efforts that were planned in advance to get as many people as possible counted in the once-a-decade head count. (Jasmine Cho via AP)
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March 28, 2020 - 11:10 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — In tiny Munfordville, Kentucky, the closure of the public library has cut people off from a computer used only for filling out census forms online. In Minneapolis, a concert promoting the once-a-decade count is now virtual. In Orlando, Florida, advocates called off knocking on...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
March 25, 2020 - 1:11 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Even though the U.S. Census Bureau had trouble finding workers for its massive address-verification work late last summer, it managed to complete the job under budget because of better-than-expected productivity of its staffers, according to a new report. The 32,000 workers...
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FILE - This March 18, 2020 file photo taken in Idaho shows a form for the U.S. Census 2020. Filling out this year's census form won't get you a check from the federal government as claims circulating on social media suggest. The posts state that if you respond to the census, you will receive a $1,200 stimulus check from the federal government that's intended to help Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. Congress is considering mailing checks directly to households, but hasn't approved funding for the stimulus funding package yet. (John Roark/The Idaho Post-Register via AP, File)
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March 23, 2020 - 3:13 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — You won't get a check in the mail for filling out this year's census as claims circulating on social media suggest. The inaccurate posts on sites including Facebook and Twitter urge people to respond to the census. They claim if you do so you will receive one of the stimulus checks...
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March 18, 2020 - 2:51 pm
The U.S. Census Bureau on Wednesday suspended field operations for two weeks, citing the health and safety of its workers and the U.S. public from the novel coronavirus. The Census Bureau made the announcement a week after the start of the 2020 census count, and bureau officials said they were...
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March 17, 2020 - 7:55 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Fox News Channel's influential prime-time lineup is starting to reflect the changed realities of the coronavirus outbreak, without embracing old enemies. The network most popular with President Donald Trump's supporters has added a daily coronavirus-themed show and extended news...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a press briefing with the coronavirus task force, in the Brady press briefing room at the White House, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
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March 17, 2020 - 1:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ahead of an expected surge in coronavirus cases, President Donald Trump on Tuesday moved to blunt the impact of the pandemic on the U.S. economy, fundamentally altered by a push for a nation to stay home. As the global markets fluctuated amid fears of a recession, the president...
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A couple walks past Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop, known as the oldest bar in the United States dating back to the 1700s, which is closed due to an order from Louisiana's Governor John Bel Edwards to shut bars and restaurants state-wide to limit the spread of the coronavirus pandemic on Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., Monday, March 16, 2020.(Max Becherer/The Advocate via AP)
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March 17, 2020 - 11:12 am
Nearly 7 million people in the San Francisco area were all but confined to their homes Tuesday in the nation's most sweeping lockdown against the coronavirus, even as spring break crowds partied in Florida and tourists lined up to pose for pictures in front of the world-famous “Welcome to Las Vegas...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
March 16, 2020 - 10:21 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Because of the new coronavirus, the U.S. Census Bureau has postponed sending out census takers to count college students in off-campus housing and delayed sending workers to grocery stores and houses of worship where they help people fill out the once-a-decade questionnaire...
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FILE - This April 11, 2018, file photo shows a sign directing voters to an early-voting location in Surprise, Ariz. Sharing the primary calendar Tuesday, March 17, 2020, are two states that represent different pieces of America: Ohio, a largely white state that’s barely growing and looking to rebound from a decline in manufacturing, and Arizona, a state where one-third of the population is Latino and growth is exploding. One looks more like the nation's past, the other could be its future. (AP Photo/Anita Snow, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 16, 2020 - 1:01 am
CLEVELAND (AP) — Sharing the primary calendar Tuesday are two states that represent different pieces of America: Ohio, a largely white state that’s barely growing and looking to rebound from a decline in manufacturing, and Arizona, a state where one-third of the population is Latino and growth is...
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