Dairy product manufacturing

This Feb. 22, 208 photo provided by Orange County Public Schools shows a coffee stand at Cypres Creek High School in Orlando, Fla. Orange County schools did not receive dairy industry grants for the coffee bars, but the local dairy council provided chalkboard-style signs and menus. (Orange County Public Schools via AP)
July 02, 2019 - 9:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Coffee bars selling $3 iced lattes are popping up in high schools, helped along by dairy groups scrambling for new ways to get people to drink milk. It's one small way the dairy industry is fighting to slow the persistent decline in U.S. milk consumption as eating habits change and...
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In this photo taken Monday, June 24, 2019, one of the inhabitants of a futuristic three-storey floating dairy farm moored in Rotterdam harbour, Netherlands. The floating farm has one robot that milks the cows, another that automatically scoops up the manure, and a roof designed to collect rain water, making it a sustainable inner-city producer of dairy foods aimed at feeding the increasing populations within world cities according to the small holding farmer Peter van Wingerden.(AP Photo/Mike Corder)
June 29, 2019 - 1:44 pm
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) — Peter van Wingerden's dairy farm smells just like any other farm — the rich aroma of cow manure and grass hangs in the air around the unusual stable housing the cattle. The farm itself is far from traditional. Moored in a small harbor in Rotterdam's busy port, the farm...
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FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2018 file photo, Hamdi Ulukaya, founder, chairman and CEO of Chobani, speaks at the National Retail Federation conference in New York. Ulukaya tweeted on Thursday, May 9, 2019, that his company will pay some of the school lunch debt for students in the Warwick, R.I., public school district. Schools there had offered students who owe money for lunches cold sunflower butter and jelly sandwiches instead of a hot meal. The mayor's office said it is coordinating with Chobani to accept nearly $50,000 owed for lunches by low-income families with children in the school system. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
May 10, 2019 - 3:06 pm
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The yogurt company Chobani plans to pay the school lunch debts of low-income families with students attending a district that made headlines by announcing children who owe money would get cold sunflower butter and jelly sandwiches instead of a hot meal, the mayor's office...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 6, 2018 file photo, cows stand at Nate Elzinga's farm in Zeeland, Mich., on the day of an auction where Elzinga and his partners sold the herd. Market forces and larger milking operations made it difficult for them to be profitable. A new federal program to help hard-pressed dairy farmers is expected to be ready for enrollment in June 2019, as farmers undergo their fifth year of low milk prices that have driven thousands out of business. (Neil Blake/The Grand Rapids Press via AP, File)
April 09, 2019 - 5:26 pm
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — An insurance program to help hard-pressed dairy farmers is expected to be ready for enrollment in June, the U.S. Farm Service Agency says, but farmers say it won't tackle the underlying challenges they face. Dairy farmers are in their fifth year of low milk prices that have...
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February 23, 2019 - 12:41 pm
PARIS (AP) — French President Emmanuel Macron pledged Saturday to protect European farming standards and culinary traditions threatened by aggressive foreign trade practices that see food as a "product like any other." Macron's speech at his country's premier agriculture fair was aimed at assuaging...
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January 30, 2019 - 4:21 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — Authorities in India's most populous state have been ordered to bar code stray cows and use vacant buildings to shelter them in response to farmers' complaints that the closure of slaughterhouses has created a menace of crop-destroying, free-range cattle. An order by the Hindu...
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January 09, 2019 - 6:25 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. government isn't doing routine food inspections because of the partial federal shutdown, but checks of the riskiest foods are expected to resume next week. The Food and Drug Administration says it's working to bring back about 150 employees to inspect riskier foods such as...
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FILE - This May 28, 2015 file photo shows cheddar cheese Madison, Wis. The practice of adding color to cheddar cheese reaches back to when cheesemakers in England skimmed the butterfat from milk to make butter, according to Elizabeth Chubbuck of Murray’s Cheese in New York. The leftover milk was whiter, so pigments were added to recreate butterfat’s golden hue, she said. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 10:21 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Many companies including McDonald's and Kellogg are purging artificial colors from their foods, but don't expect your cheeseburgers or cereal to look much different. Colors send important signals about food, and companies aren't going to stop playing into those perceptions. What's...
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In this July 11, 2018 photo, animal geneticist Alison Van Eenennaam of the University of California, Davis, points to a group of dairy calves that won’t have to be de-horned thanks to gene editing. The calves are descended from a bull genetically altered to be hornless, and the company behind the work, Recombinetics, says gene-edited traits could ease animal suffering and improve productivity. (AP Photo/Haven Daley)
November 15, 2018 - 7:52 am
OAKFIELD, N.Y. (AP) — Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty. A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its...
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Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 1:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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