Court decisions

1010 WINS Newsroom
September 09, 2020 - 2:15 pm
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — A Turkish court on Wednesday convicted five journalists over their reports on the funeral of an intelligence officer who was killed in Libya and sentenced them to more than three years in prison, state-run media reported. But all have been released from custody pending the...
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FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2017 file photo Martin Winterkorn, former CEO of the German car manufacturer 'Volkswagen', arrives for a questioning at an investigation committee of the German federal parliament in Berlin, Germany. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, file)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 09, 2020 - 11:02 am
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — A German court has ruled former Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn must stand trial on fraud charges in connection with the company's diesel emission scandal in which it sold cars with software that let them cheat on emissions tests. The three-judge panel in Braunschweig in...
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FILE - In this Sept. 17, 2019, file photo, R. Kelly appears during a hearing at the Leighton Criminal Courthouse in Chicago. Kelly can remain behind bars awaiting multiple trials on child pornography and other charges in three states, an appeals court in New York said Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, as a lawyer for the R&B singer cited another inmate's attack on Kelly last month as one reason he should receive bail. (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via AP, Pool, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 08, 2020 - 5:52 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — R. Kelly can remain behind bars awaiting multiple trials on child pornography and other charges in three states, an appeals court in New York said Tuesday as a lawyer for the R&B singer cited another inmate's attack on Kelly last month as one reason he should receive bail. The...
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FILE - This Sunday, April 5, 2020, photo shows an envelope containing a 2020 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident in Detroit. The U.S. Census Bureau has spent much of the past year defending itself against allegations that its duties have been overtaken by politics. With a failed attempt by the Trump administration to add a citizenship question, the hiring of three political appointees with limited experience to top positions, a sped-up schedule and a directive from President Donald Trump to exclude undocumented residents from the process of redrawing congressional districts, the 2020 census has descended into a high-stakes partisan battle. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 08, 2020 - 2:41 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Two days after a federal judge ordered the U.S. Census Bureau to stop winding down 2020 census operations for the time being, the statistical agency said Tuesday in court papers that it's refraining from laying off some census takers and it's restoring some quality-control...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019 file photo, a picture of slain Saudi journalist Jamal Kashoggi, is displayed during a ceremony near the Saudi Arabia consulate in Istanbul, marking the one-year anniversary of his death. Saudi Arabia’s state television says final verdicts have been issued in the case of slain Washington Post columnist and Saudi critic Jamal Khashoggi after his family announced pardons that spared five from execution. The Riyadh Criminal Court issued final verdicts Monday, Sept. 7, 2020, against eight people. The court ordered a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison for five, with one receiving a 10-year sentence and two others being ordered to serve seven years in prison. The trial was widely criticized by rights groups and an independent U.N. investigator, who noted that no senior officials nor anyone suspected of ordering the killing was found guilty. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 07, 2020 - 12:14 pm
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A Saudi court issued final verdicts on Monday in the case of slain Washington Post columnist and Saudi critic Jamal Khashoggi after his son, who still resides in the kingdom, announced pardons that spared five of the convicted individuals from execution. While the...
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FILE - In this April 23, 2019 file photo, immigration activists rally outside the Supreme Court as the justices hear arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, in Washington. The U.S. Census Bureau has spent much of the past year defending itself against allegations that its duties have been overtaken by politics. With a failed attempt by the Trump administration to add a citizenship question, the hiring of three political appointees with limited experience to top positions, a sped-up schedule and a directive from President Donald Trump to exclude undocumented residents from the process of redrawing congressional districts, the 2020 census has descended into a high-stakes partisan battle. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 06, 2020 - 1:50 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Census Bureau for now must stop following a plan that would have it winding down operations in order to finish the 2020 census at the end of September, according to a federal judge's order. U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California, issued a temporary...
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FILE - In this March 28, 2012, file photo, Amit Mehta, then the attorney for Dominique Strauss-Kahn speaks in Bronx state Supreme Court in New York. Judge Amit Mehta has ordered the Trump administration to resume issuing diversity visas for immigrants from underrepresented countries. The order issued Friday, Sept. 4, 2020 in Washington, D.C., partially reverse a pandemic-related freeze on a wide range of immigrant and temporary visas. The U.S. issues up to 55,000 visas a year to people from countries with low representation in the U.S., many in Africa. U.S. District Court Judge Amit Mehta denied requests to take similar action on other visa categories subject to bans. (Stan Honda/Pool Photo via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 05, 2020 - 5:28 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A federal judge ordered the Trump administration to resume issuing diversity visas for immigrants from underrepresented countries, partially reversing a pandemic-related freeze on a wide range of immigrant and temporary visas. The U.S. issues up to 55,000 visas a year to people...
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Photo credit FILE - In this March 28, 2012, file photo, Amit Mehta, then the attorney for Dominique Strauss-Kahn speaks in Bronx state Supreme Court in New York. Judge Amit Mehta has ordered the Trump administration to resume issuing diversity visas for immigrants from underrepresented countries. The order issued Friday, Sept. 4, 2020 in Washington, D.C., partially reverse a pandemic-related freeze on a wide range of immigrant and temporary visas. The U.S. issues up to 55,000 visas a year to people from countries with low representation in the U.S., many in Africa. U.S. District Court Judge Amit Mehta denied requests to take similar action on other visa categories subject to bans. (Stan Honda/Pool Photo via AP, File)
September 05, 2020 - 5:28 pm
In ruling, judge throws lifeline to diversity visa lottery…
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FILE - In this July 23, 2020, file photo, protesters wave signs in front of the Hampton Inn hotel in McAllen, Texas. The Trump administration has sharply increased its use of hotels to detain immigrant children as young as 1 before expelling them from the United States during the coronavirus pandemic despite facing outcry from lawmakers and human-rights advocates. (Joel Martinez/The Monitor via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 04, 2020 - 9:03 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A federal judge ordered the Trump administration on Friday to stop detaining immigrant children in hotels before expelling them from the United States, saying the much-criticized practice skirted “fundamental humanitarian protections." U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee ruled that the use...
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Stacks of ballot envelopes waiting to be mailed are seen at the Wake County Board of Elections in Raleigh, N.C., Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020. North Carolina is scheduled to begin sending out more than 600,000 requested absentee ballots to voters on Friday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 04, 2020 - 7:11 pm
A North Carolina court ruled Friday that outstanding restitution, fees or other court-imposed monetary obligations can't prevent convicted felons from voting if they've completed all other portions of their sentence. The ruling, which may face appeals, could pave the way for an influx of felons to...
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