Constitutional amendments

FILE - In this Thursday Feb. 21, 2019 file photo State Senators Janet Howell, D-Fairfax, front left, Jennifer Boysko, D-Fairfax, second from left, and Sen. Barbara Favola, D-Arlington third from left, applaud a speech along with other ERA supporters in the gallery of the the House of Delegates at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Democrats hoping to seize control of the Virginia Legislature in the 2019 elections say passing the long-stalled Equal Rights Amendment will be a top priority next year. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 26, 2019 - 8:36 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — As Carol Jenkins sees it, a nearly 100-year push to add the Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is closer to reality now than it's ever been. That's why there's a "tremendous effort" underway to elect supporters of the long-stalled gender equality measure in...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
October 07, 2019 - 6:21 pm
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge is considering whether Florida lawmakers exceeded their authority by requiring former felons to pay fines and settle other legal debts as a condition of regaining their right to vote. The case is one of several ongoing legal battles that underscore Florida's...
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FILE - In this April 15, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump walks down the steps of Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in Md. Four California voters have sued Monday, Aug. 5, 2019, to block a new state law aimed at forcing Republican President Donald Trump to release his personal income tax returns. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law last week that requires presidential candidates to file five years of their income tax returns with the California Secretary of State at least 98 days prior to the primary election. Candidates who don't do it won't appear on the ballot. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 05, 2019 - 8:39 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Four California voters have sued to block a new state law aimed at forcing Republican President Donald Trump to release his income tax returns. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law last week that requires presidential candidates to file five years of their income tax...
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Pedro Pierluisi, sworn in as Puerto Rico's governor, speaks during a press conference, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Friday, Aug. 2, 2019. Departing Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello resigned as promised on Friday and swore in Pierluisi, a veteran politician as his replacement, a move certain to throw the U.S. territory into a period of political chaos that will be fought out in court. Pierluisi is flanked by lawmakers Jorge Navarro, left and Jose Aponte. (AP Photo/Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo)
August 02, 2019 - 10:25 pm
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló resigned Friday as promised, clearing the way for veteran politician Pedro Pierluisi to be sworn in as his replacement, a move that threw the U.S. territory into a period of fresh political uncertainty. Rosselló had promised to step...
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FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2005, file photo, U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens winds up to throw out the first pitch before the start of the Chicago Cubs game with the Cincinnati Reds, at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens never really put down his pen. Without opinions and dissents to write following his retirement from the Supreme Court in 2010, Stevens chose instead to write books from his home in Florida, reflecting on his life but also the Constitution. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
July 22, 2019 - 11:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens never really put down his pen. Without opinions and dissents to write following his retirement from the Supreme Court in 2010, Stevens chose instead to write books from his home in Florida, reflecting on his life but also the...
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FILE - In this Thursday, April 11, 2019, file photo David Niven, a professor of political science at the University of Cincinnati, holds a map demonstrating a gerrymandered Ohio district in Cincinnati. The Supreme Court said, by a 5-4 vote on Thursday, June 27, 2019, that claims of partisan gerrymandering do not belong in federal court. The court's conservative, Republican-appointed majority says that voters and elected officials should be the arbiters of what is a political dispute The decision effectively reverses the outcome of rulings in Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina and Ohio, where courts had ordered new maps drawn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
June 28, 2019 - 1:20 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The battle for political advantage in state capitols is poised to become more intense after the U.S. Supreme Court declared that federal judges have no role in settling disputes over partisan gerrymandering. The ruling this week could empower Republicans and Democrats who...
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June 27, 2019 - 6:17 pm
A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday rejecting partisan gerrymandering claims in North Carolina and Maryland will effectively end similar federal lawsuits in several states. But it isn't likely to stop other cases challenging congressional or state legislative districts on different grounds or in...
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FILE - In this July 18, 2018, file photo, demonstrators rally outside the Michigan Hall of Justice in Lansing, Mich., where the state's Supreme Court heard arguments about whether voters in November should be able to pass a constitutional amendment that would change how the state's voting maps are drawn. The U.S. Supreme Court says it's up to the states to deal with partisan political mapmaking, and a number of them already are doing so with long-term redistricting reforms. (Dale G. Young/Detroit News via AP)
June 27, 2019 - 5:27 pm
While ruling that it had no authority to resolve partisan gerrymandering claims, the U.S. Supreme Court noted Thursday that states could act on their own to try to limit the role of politics in drawing congressional and state legislative districts. Several states already have done so, including...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, file photo, voters stand in line to cast their ballots at P.S. 22, in the Prospect Heights neighborhood in the Brooklyn borough of New York. An effort by Democrats to implement broad reforms to the nation’s voting process has stalled in the U.S. Senate, but some states are moving forward to expand access through early voting, same-day voter registration and other measures ahead of 2020. The biggest success for voting rights advocates so far is New York, which had been one of a dozen states not offering some form of early voting. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
June 01, 2019 - 11:15 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — New York voters for years have experienced some of the longest wait times in the nation on Election Day. Attempts to fix the problem routinely became casualties of the divided politics of the state Legislature. That dynamic changed last November, when Democrats won majorities in both...
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CORRECTS YEAR OF CASE TO 2016, NOT 2017 - In this Tuesday, April 30, 2019 photo, Cash Spencer poses for a photo in Portland, Ore. Spencer was a dissenting juror in a sodomy case in the 2016 conviction of Olan Williams. Oregon is the last state to allow split juries in criminal cases. Just ten of twelve jurors need agree for a guilty verdict. (AP Photo/Craig Mitchelldyer)
May 08, 2019 - 7:12 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — After a jury convicted an Oregon man of having sex with a passed-out partygoer, one of the jurors left the courthouse and wept. Cash Spencer and three other jurors believed the defendant was innocent, but after a lunch break, one changed her mind. Hours later, another changed...
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