Constitutional amendments

Irina, right, and Anastasia Lagutenko play with their son, Dorian, at a playground in St. Petersburg, Russia, July 2, 2020. Their 2017 wedding wasn’t legally recognized in Russia. Any hopes they could someday officially be married in their homeland vanished July 1 when voters approved a package of constitutional amendments, one of which stipulates that marriage in Russia is only between a man and a woman. (AP Photo)
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July 13, 2020 - 2:29 am
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — At the Lagutenko wedding in 2017, the couple exchanged vows, rings and kisses in front of friends and relatives, then took a traditional drive in a limousine, stopping at landmarks for photos. But because they were both women, the wedding wasn’t legal in Russia. If...
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Honor guard members from the Mississippi National Guard practice folding the former Mississippi flag before a ceremony to retire the banner on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, inside the state Capitol in Jackson. The ceremony happened a day after Republican Gov. Tate Reeves signed a law that removed the flag's official status as a state symbol. The 126-year-old banner was the last state flag in the U.S. with the Confederate battle emblem. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)
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July 04, 2020 - 8:10 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi just ditched its Confederate-themed state flag. Later this year, the state's voters will decide whether to dump a statewide election process that dates to the Jim Crow era. Facing pressure from a lawsuit and the possibility of action from a federal judge,...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of working group to prepare proposals on amending the Russian Constitution via teleconference in Moscow, Russia, Friday, July 3, 2020. Almost 78% of voters in Russia have approved amendments to the country's constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036, Russian election officials said Thursday after all the votes were counted. Kremlin critics said the vote was rigged. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
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July 03, 2020 - 9:50 am
MOSCOW (AP) — President Vladimir Putin on Friday ordered amendments that would allow him to remain in power until 2036 to be put into the Russian Constitution after voters approved the changes during a week-long plebiscite. “The amendments come into force. They come into force, without overstating...
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Ella Pamfilova, head of Russian Central Election Commission, wearing a face mask and gloves to protect against coronavirus, center left, gestures while speaking at a news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, July 2, 2020. Almost 78% of voters in Russia have approved amendments to the country's constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036, Russian election officials said Thursday after all the votes were counted. Kremlin critics said the vote was rigged. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
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July 02, 2020 - 11:49 am
MOSCOW (AP) — A vote that cleared the way for President Vladimir Putin to rule Russia until 2036 was denounced Thursday by his political opponents as a “Pyrrhic victory” that will only further erode his support and legitimacy. Putin himself thanked voters for their “support and trust,” and repeated...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin shows his passport to a member of an election commission as he arrives to take part in voting at a polling station in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. The vote on the constitutional amendments that would reset the clock on Russian President Vladimir Putin's tenure and enable him to serve two more six-year terms is set to wrap up Wednesday. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
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July 01, 2020 - 4:54 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian voters approved changes to the constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to potentially hold power until 2036, but the weeklong plebiscite that concluded Wednesday was tarnished by widespread reports of pressure on voters and other irregularities. With three-...
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FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2019, file photo, supporters of Yes on 802 Oklahomans Decide Healthcare, calling for Medicaid expansion to be put on the ballot, carry boxes of petitions into the office of the Oklahoma Secretary of State in Oklahoma City. Oklahoma voters will decide Tuesday, June 30, 2020, whether to expand Medicaid to tens of thousands of low-income residents and become the first state to amend their Constitution to do so. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
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June 30, 2020 - 9:04 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma voters are deciding Tuesday whether to expand Medicaid to tens of thousands of low-income residents and become the first state to amend their Constitution to do so. While an increasing number of Oklahoma voters took advantage of mail-in voting for Tuesday's primary,...
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FILE - In this March 6, 2018, file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to employees of Uralvagonzavod factory in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. In 2011, Nizhny Tagil - an industrial city some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow - was nicknamed “Putingrad” for its residents' fervent support of the president. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)
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June 30, 2020 - 7:51 am
NIZHNY TAGIL, Russia (AP) — In 2011, the industrial city of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support for Russian President Vladimir Putin. Nine years later, it appears the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow no longer lives up to that nickname. Workers are...
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In this photo taken on Saturday, June 27, 2020, people show their Russian passports sitting on a bus to Russia at a bus to Russia at a bus stop in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine. Residents of separatist-controlled regions in eastern Ukraine who have Russian citizenship are traveling to Russia to vote on constitutional amendments that would allow President Vladimir Putin to remain in power until 2036. Authorities of the self-proclaimed Luhansk and Donetsk People's Republics have organized bus services to polling stations in the neighboring Rostov region in Russia, in what is seen by many as part of the wide-spread effort to boost turnout at the controversial plebiscite. (AP Photo/Alexei Alexandrov)
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June 29, 2020 - 6:07 am
DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) — Residents of separatist-controlled regions in eastern Ukraine who have Russian citizenship are travelling to Russia to vote on constitutional amendments that would allow President Vladimir Putin to remain in power until 2036. Authorities of the self-proclaimed Luhansk and...
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A voter wearing a face mask and protective gloves to protect against coronavirus walks to cast her ballot at a polling station in St.Petersburg, Russia, Thursday, June 25, 2020. Polls have opened in Russia on Thursday for a week-long vote on a constitutional reform that may allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)
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June 25, 2020 - 12:34 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Polls opened in Russia on Thursday for a week-long vote on constitutional changes that would allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036. The vote on a slew of constitutional amendments, proposed by Putin in January, was initially scheduled for April 22, but was...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers his speech during the Victory Day military parade marking the 75th anniversary of the Nazi defeat in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, June 24, 2020. The Victory Day parade normally is held on May 9, the nation's most important secular holiday, but this year it was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. (Ramil Sitdikov, Host Photo Agency via AP)
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June 25, 2020 - 7:07 am
MOSCOW (AP) — They’ve offered prizes ranging from gift certificates to cars and apartments. They’ve put up billboards and enlisted celebrities to urge a “yes” vote. They’ve encouraged state-run businesses like hospitals and schools to pressure employees to register at the polls. Russian authorities...
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