Coastlines and beaches

In this May 10, 2019 photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Office of Spill Prevention and Response, oil flows at a Chevron oil field in Kern County, Calif. Nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water has seeped from the ground since May. Chevron and California officials say the spill is not near any waterway and has not significantly affected wildlife. (California Deptartment of Fish and Wildlife's Office of Spill Prevention and Response via AP)
July 12, 2019 - 8:54 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Officials began to clean up a massive oil spill Friday that dumped nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water into a California canyon, making it larger — if less devastating — than the state's last two major oil spills. The newly revealed spill has been flowing off and on...
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In this undated photo provide by PRM Nautical Foundation on Friday, July 12, 2019, an amphora which dates from between the 7th and 5th centuries BC stands underwater near the shores of the Karaburun peninsula, Albania. A joint Albanian - American underwater archaeological team said they have found 22 amphoras that are at least 2,500 years old off the Albanian coast, which might yield an ancient shipwreck.(RPM Nautical Foundation via AP)
July 12, 2019 - 7:51 am
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — A joint Albanian-American underwater archaeology project says it has found amphoras that are at least 2,500 years old in the Ionian Sea off the Albanian coast, which might yield an ancient shipwreck. The research vessel Hercules of the RPM Nautical Foundation said Friday they...
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In this Wednesday, July 10, 2019 photo, former U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, center, gestures as he is briefed by Bangladesh foreign minister A.K.Abdul Momen, right during a vist to the Kutupalong Rohingya refugees camp in the southern coastal district of Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Ban has expressed concern that monsoon floods could threaten the lives of Rohingya refugees in sprawling camps in Bangladesh. (AP Photo/ Al-emrun Garjon)
July 11, 2019 - 1:36 pm
KUTUPALONG, Bangladesh (AP) — Former U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has expressed concern that monsoon floods could threaten the lives of Rohingya refugees in sprawling camps in Bangladesh. Ban, who was visiting in his role as head of The Hague-based Global Commission on Adaptation to climate...
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Workers check the damages at a gas station after a storm at Nea Potidea village in Halkidiki region, northern Greece, Thursday, July 11, 2019. A search and rescue operation is underway in northern Greece for a fisherman missing after a powerful storm left six people dead, including two children, and injured more than 100. (Giannis Moisiadis/InTime News via AP)
July 11, 2019 - 1:18 pm
THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) — A state of emergency has been declared in an area of northern Greece after a violent storm tore through seaside resorts, killing six tourists. A fisherman, who had been missing, was also found dead Thursday taking the death toll to seven. The widespread damage wrought by...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2006, file photo, gulls nest near the North Landing area of the Farallon Islands National Refuge, Calif. The California Coastal Commission on Wednesday, July 10, 2019, will hear public comment on a federal plan to drop 1.5 tons of rat poison on the Farallon Islands in an effort to eradicate a mice infestation, a proposal that is drawing criticism. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
July 10, 2019 - 7:05 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Federal wildlife officials were urged Wednesday to withdraw a proposal to drop 1.5 tons of rat poison on remote islands off the coast of California to kill a mice infestation until they address questions on the impact to wildlife. The California Coastal Commission heard public...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 3:21 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The federal government is warning Americans to brace for a "floodier" future. Government scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino...
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July 10, 2019 - 3:10 pm
DULUTH, Minn. (AP) — A Minnesota woman who swims topless in Lake Superior says she won't be dissuaded by someone who called the police on her. Michelle Bennett was sunbathing topless on the beach in Duluth last month when a woman asked her to cover up, saying she was making the woman's children...
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July 10, 2019 - 10:18 am
ROME (AP) — Hail the size of oranges has injured 18 people in an Italian Adriatic city, while a blaze in Sicily forced beachgoers to flee. The Italian news agency ANSA quoted Pescara hospital emergency room officials as saying that Wednesday's hailstorm caused cuts requiring sutures and bruises,...
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A whale is unloaded at a port in Kushiro, in the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, Monday, July 1, 2019. Japan is resuming commercial whaling after 31 years, meeting a long-cherished goal seen as a largely lost cause. Japan's six-month notice to withdraw from the International Whaling Commission took effect Sunday.(Masanori Takei/Kyodo News via AP)
July 01, 2019 - 8:38 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese whalers returned to port Monday with their first catch after resuming commercial whaling for the first time in 31 years, achieving the long-cherished goal of traditionalists that is seen as largely a lost cause amid slowing demand for the meat and changing views on...
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FILE - This May 24, 2006, file photo shows the village of Newtok, Alaska, where the eroding bank along the Ninglick River has long been a problem for the village, 480 miles west of Anchorage. Northern Alaska coastal communities and climate scientists say sea ice disappeared far earlier than normal this spring and it's affecting wildlife. The Anchorage Daily News reported in June 2019 that ice melted because of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
June 30, 2019 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Sea ice along northern Alaska disappeared far earlier than normal this spring, alarming coastal residents who rely on wildlife and fish. Ice melted as a result of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures, the Anchorage Daily News reported . The early melting has been "crazy,"...
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