Climate change

FILE - In this April 30, 2014, file photo, Dustin Shaw lifts debris as he searches through what is left of his sister's house at Parkwood Meadows neighborhood after a tornado in Vilonia, Ark. A new study finds that tornado activity is generally shifting eastward to areas just east of the Mississippi River that are more vulnerable such as Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee. And it's going down in Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
October 17, 2018 - 6:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting — decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain why. Tornado activity is increasing most in Mississippi...
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October 16, 2018 - 11:34 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon appealed for a sense of urgency Tuesday as he launched a new commission that aims to accelerate and expand ways the world can prepare for climate change. "Without urgent adaptation action, we risk undermining food,...
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FILE - This Wednesday, April 19, 2017 file photo shows the beer cooler behind the counter in a convenience store in Sheridan, Ind. In future sweltering years with a double whammy of heat and drought, losses of barley yield can be as much as 17 percent, computer simulations show. And that means “beer prices would, on average, double,” even adjusting for inflation, said a study published in the journal Nature Plants on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
October 15, 2018 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says global warming may leave people crying in their costlier beer. The international study says bouts of extreme heat waves and drought will cut production of barley, a key ingredient of beer. When that happens, beer prices on average could double. In countries like...
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President Donald Trump crosses the South Lawn on his return to the White House, Saturday Oct. 13, 2018, in Washington, after a trip to Kentucky. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
October 15, 2018 - 1:26 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is backing off his claim that climate change is a hoax but says he doesn't know if it's manmade and suggests that the climate will "change back again." In an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" that aired Sunday night, Trump said he doesn't want to put the U.S...
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The Oceanis is grounded by a tidal surge at the Port St. Joe Marina, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018 in Port St. Joe, Fla. Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods. (Douglas R. Clifford/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
October 10, 2018 - 10:54 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods before continuing its destructive charge inland across the Southeast. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the continental U...
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The Oceanis is grounded by a tidal surge at the Port St. Joe Marina, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018 in Port St. Joe, Fla. Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods. (Douglas R. Clifford/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
October 10, 2018 - 7:28 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Powerful Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods before continuing its destructive march inland across the Southeast. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the...
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Urgenda director Marjan Minnesma hugs members of her legal team after the court turned down an appeal of the Dutch government against a 2015 landmark ruling ordering the government to cut the country's greenhouse gas emissions by at least 25 percent by 2020 in a climate case that activists hope will set a worldwide precedent, in The Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. The case was brought to court by Urgenda, a sustainability organization on behalf of some 900 citizens, claiming that the the government has a duty of care to protect its citizens against looming dangers.(AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
October 09, 2018 - 5:54 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A Dutch appeals court on Tuesday upheld a landmark ruling that ordered the Dutch government to cut the country's greenhouse gas emissions by at least 25 percent by 2020 from benchmark 1990 levels. "Considering the great dangers that are likely to occur, more ambitious...
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Peter Salovey, President of Yale University, right, welcomes Yale University Professor William Nordhaus, one of the 2018 winners of the Nobel Prize in economics, to the podium just before speaking about the honor Monday, Oct. 8, 2018, in New Haven, Conn. Nordhaus was named for integrating climate change into long term macroeconomic analysis. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
October 08, 2018 - 5:07 pm
Advocates of taxing fossil fuels believe their position is stronger now because of an alarming new report on climate change and a Nobel Prize awarded to by two American economists, but neither development is likely to break down political resistance to a carbon tax. Previous alarms about global...
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FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2015 file photo, fish swim over a patch of bleached coral in Hawaii's Kaneohe Bay off the island of Oahu. Warmer water is repeatedly causing mass global bleaching events to Earth's fragile coral reefs. A United Nations science report released on Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018 (Monday, Oct. 8, South Korea time) says limiting global warming by an extra degree could be a matter of life or death for people and ecosystems. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
October 08, 2018 - 11:19 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2010 file photo, then Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Senior Fellow Paul Romer attends the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Two researchers at American universities have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize for Economics. Yale University's William Nordhaus was named for integrating climate change into long term macroeconomic analysis and New York University's Paul Romer was awarded for factoring technological innovation into macroeconomics. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)
October 08, 2018 - 9:56 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in economics on Monday, one for studying the economics of climate change and the other for showing how to help foster the innovation needed to solve such a problem. William Nordhaus of Yale University and Paul Romer of New York University will...
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