Civil rights violations

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2019, file photo, political activist Laura Loomer holds uo a sign across the street from a rally organized by Women's March NYC after she barged onto the stage interrupting Women's March NYC director Agunda Okeyo who was speaking during a rally in New York. Loomer was escorted off the stage after the incident. A federal appeals court on Wednesday, May 27, 2020, upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit that accused Twitter, Facebook and other tech giants of conspiring to stifle the political views of a far-right activist and a conservative nonprofit. A three-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that Loomer and Freedom Watch Inc. don’t have any viable claims that the companies violated their First Amendment free speech rights. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
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May 27, 2020 - 5:07 pm
A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit that accused Twitter, Facebook and other tech giants of conspiring to stifle the political views of a far-right activist and a conservative nonprofit. A three-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2020 file photo provided by the Michigan Office of the Governor, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addresses the state during a speech in Lansing, The state of Michigan has announced a settlement in a lawsuit over poor reading skills that was filed on behalf of Detroit schoolchildren, weeks after a federal appeals court issued a groundbreaking decision recognizing a constitutional right to education and literacy. Whitmer and the plaintiffs announced the agreement early Thursday, May 14. They say the settlement “will help secure the right of access to literacy for students in Detroit who faced obstacles they never should have faced.” (Michigan Office of the Governor via AP, Pool, File)
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May 14, 2020 - 11:06 am
LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The state of Michigan early Thursday announced a settlement in a lawsuit over poor reading skills that was filed on behalf of Detroit schoolchildren, weeks after a federal appeals court issued a groundbreaking decision recognizing a constitutional right to education and...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2019, file photo, Chris Puehse, owner of Foothill Ammo, displays .45-caliber ammunition for sale at his store in Shingle Springs, Calif. A federal judge on Thursday, April 23, 2020, blocked a California law requiring background checks for people buying ammunition, ruling the restrictions violate the constitutional right to bear arms. U.S. District Judge Roger Benitez of San Diego ruled in favor of the California Rifle & Pistol Association, which asked him to stop the checks and related restrictions on ammo sales. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
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April 23, 2020 - 9:07 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge on Thursday blocked a California law requiring background checks for people buying ammunition, issuing a sharply worded rebuke of “onerous and convoluted” regulations that violate the constitutional right to bear arms. U.S. District Judge Roger Benitez in...
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FILE - In this March 25, 2020 file photo, Idaho Gov. Brad Little speaks at a news conference in Boise, Idaho and issues a statewide stay-at-home order in efforts to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The American Civil Liberties Union and Legal Voice filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday, April 15 challenging Idaho's newly-created law banning transgender women from competing in women's sports, the first such law in the nation. Little late last month signed into law the measure that received overwhelming support in the Republican-dominated House and Senate, but no support from Democrats. (Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman via AP, File)
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April 15, 2020 - 1:29 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Two civil rights groups filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday challenging a new Idaho law banning transgender women from competing in women’s sports, the first such law in the nation. The American Civil Liberties Union and Legal Voice filed the lawsuit contending the law violates...
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FILE - This is a Jan. 27, 2020 file photo of The Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Mark Tenally)
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April 06, 2020 - 10:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to take the case of a 1960s black militant formerly known as H. Rap Brown who is in prison for killing a Georgia sheriff’s deputy in 2000. As is usual, the justices didn't comment Monday in turning away Brown's case. Brown had argued his...
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FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2019 file photo, Bloomfield High School transgender athlete Terry Miller, second from left, wins the final of the 55-meter dash over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood, far left, and other runners in the Connecticut girls Class S indoor track meet at Hillhouse High School in New Haven, Conn. In a response to a lawsuit brought by three female high school runners, the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference maintains that it is exempt from Title IX, that guarantees equal access to women and girls in education, including athletics. The lawsuit argues that male anatomy gives the transgender runners an unfair advantage in violation of Title IX. (AP Photo/Pat Eaton-Robb, File)
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March 25, 2020 - 6:36 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The U.S. Justice Department is getting involved in a federal civil rights lawsuit that seeks to block transgender athletes in Connecticut from competing as girls in interscholastic sports. Attorney General William Barr signed what is known as a statement of interest Tuesday,...
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In this March 16, 2020 photo, a tree blooms outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, March 16, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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March 23, 2020 - 10:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that states can prevent criminal defendants from pleading insanity without violating their constitutional rights. The decision could prompt states across the country to toughen standards for defendants who wish to plead not guilty by reason of...
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In this April 10, 2013 file photo, Jonathan Scalise, owner of Ammunition Storage Components, holds up a 10-round, left, and a 30-round magazine that his company manufacturers for the AR-15 rifle in New Britain, Conn. Gun rights supporters are suing Connecticut officials over part of a 2013 state gun control law passed after the Sandy Hook school shooting, saying it unconstitutionally bans people from loading more than 10 rounds of ammunition into their firearms. The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 cites the Second Amendment right to bear arms and the ability of people to better defend themselves with more bullets in their guns. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
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March 11, 2020 - 1:35 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Gun rights supporters are suing Connecticut officials over part of a 2013 state gun control law passed after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, saying it unconstitutionally bans people from loading more than 10 rounds of ammunition into their firearms. The lawsuit...
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FILE- In this May 24, 2010, file photo, an SUV with a personalized license plate is seen in Beverly Hills, Calif. California may have to end most restrictions on personalized license plate language that some might find offensive, if a lawsuit filed Tuesday, March 10, 2020, prevails. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
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March 10, 2020 - 6:32 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California may have to end most restrictions on personalized license plate language that some might find offensive, if a lawsuit filed Tuesday prevails. The libertarian Pacific Legal Foundation lawsuit challenges the state Department of Motor Vehicles' current policy on...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. A Florida law that allows judges to bar anyone deemed dangerous from possessing firearms has been used 3,500 times since its enactment after the 2018 high school massacre. An Associated Press analysis shows the law is being used unevenly around the state. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
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February 14, 2020 - 11:49 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A 23-year-old man who posted on Facebook, “I don't know why I don't go on a killing spree." A West Palm Beach couple who shot up their home while high on cocaine. A 31-year-old Gulf Coast man who pointed a semiautomatic rifle at a motorcyclist. All four Florida...
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