Cancer

In this Saturday, March 30, 2019 photo provided by the American Association for Cancer Research, Billy Foster speaks during the organization's annual meeting in Atlanta. The jazz pianist and radio show host from Gary, Indiana had a cancerous kidney removed in 1996, but in 2007 learned the disease had spread to his lungs, liver and brain. He joined a study testing an experimental drug that helped him for five years until the company abandoned it. "It wasn't working for enough people but it was saving my life," Foster said. His doctor persuaded the company to keep making the drug for him for another year, long enough for a new drug to come out that seems to be keeping his cancer in check. (Scott Morgan/AARC via AP)
April 03, 2019 - 5:00 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Millions of people are living longer with cancers that have spread widely and are considered incurable. Now, there's a push for more research on what it's like to live with the disease, not just how to treat it. At a cancer conference that ends Wednesday in Atlanta, long-term...
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April 03, 2019 - 2:12 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In a story April 1 about $21 million jury verdict against Chevron, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a tire factory where two men worked with the solvent benzene was owned by Unocal, later purchased by Chevron. Unocal did not own the tire factory. A corrected...
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FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 4, 2018 file photo, a worker adds CBD oil to a drink at a coffee shop in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Cannabidiol is one of more than 100 compounds found in marijuana. (Jennifer Lett/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
April 02, 2019 - 10:09 pm
With CBD showing up everywhere, U.S. regulators announced Tuesday they are exploring ways the marijuana extract could be used legally in foods, dietary supplements and cosmetics. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it will hold a public hearing May 31 to gather more information on the...
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This March 12, 2019 photo provided by Brigitte Sagasser shows her in San Marcos, Calif. Sagasser, a participant in a federal study for rare cancers, seems to be benefitting from the treatment. Her tumors have been shrinking since starting the treatment a year ago for a rare type of ovarian cancer that defied surgeries, chemotherapy and hormone therapy. (Courtesy Brigitte Sagasser via AP)
April 01, 2019 - 12:34 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — People with rare cancers have been out of luck — not only do most lack good treatments but drug companies also don't pursue them because of small potential sales. Now, a federal study that pools these folks gives them strength in numbers and new options. The first results from this...
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FILE - This Dec. 11, 2006 file photo shows a silicone gel breast implant in Irving, Texas. U.S. health officials are taking another look at the safety of breast implants, the latest review in a decades-long debate. At a two-day meeting that starts Monday, March 25, 2019, a panel of experts for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hear from researchers, plastic surgeons and implant makers, as well as from women who believe their ailments were caused by the implants. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, File)
March 25, 2019 - 9:30 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Government medical advisers said Monday it's too soon to ban a type of breast implant that has recently been linked to a rare form of cancer, saying more information is needed to understand the problem. The Food and Drug Administration panel didn't recommend any immediate...
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FILE - This Dec. 11, 2006 file photo shows a silicone gel breast implant in Irving, Texas. U.S. health officials are taking another look at the safety of breast implants, the latest review in a decades-long debate. At a two-day meeting that starts Monday, March 25, 2019, a panel of experts for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hear from researchers, plastic surgeons and implant makers, as well as from women who believe their ailments were caused by the implants. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, File)
March 24, 2019 - 8:28 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials are taking another look at the safety of breast implants, the latest review in a decades-long debate. At a two-day meeting that starts Monday, a panel of experts for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hear from researchers, plastic surgeons and...
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March 19, 2019 - 5:40 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury in federal court in San Francisco has concluded that Roundup weed killer was a substantial factor in a California man's cancer. The unanimous verdict on Tuesday came in a trial that plaintiffs' attorneys said could help determine the fate of hundreds of similar lawsuits...
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This 2018 photo made available by the National Cancer Institute shows Dr. Norman E. Sharpless. On Tuesday, March 12, 2019, The Food and Drug Administration announced that Sharpless will temporarily take charge of the agency after the unexpected departure of its current chief, Scott Gottlieb. (H. Darr Beiser/NCI via AP)
March 12, 2019 - 3:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the National Cancer Institute will temporarily take charge of the Food and Drug Administration next month after the departure of its current chief. The appointment Tuesday of Dr. Ned Sharpless comes a week after Scott Gottlieb unexpectedly announced his resignation...
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FILE - This Oct. 14, 2015 file photo shows the Food & Drug Administration campus in Silver Spring, Md. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the FDA approved Roche’s Tecentriq, the first cancer immunotherapy for treating an aggressive type of breast cancer. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
March 08, 2019 - 6:26 pm
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first immunotherapy drug for breast cancer. Swiss drugmaker Roche's Tecentriq was OK'd Friday for treating advanced triple-negative breast cancer, which accounts for about 15 percent of cases. It's to be given with chemotherapy, the standard...
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In this Oct. 1, 2018, photo, moderator Alex Trebek speaks during a gubernatorial debate between Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf and Republican Scott Wagner in Hershey, Pa. Jeopardy!" host Trebek says he has been diagnosed with advanced -four pancreatic cancer. In a video posted online Wednesday, March 6, 2019, Trebek said he was announcing his illness directly to "Jeopardy!" fans in keeping with his long-time policy of being "open and transparent." (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
March 06, 2019 - 8:09 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek said he has been diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer but intends to fight the disease and keep on working. In a video posted online Wednesday, the 78-year-old said he was announcing his illness directly to "Jeopardy!" fans in keeping with his...
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