Aviation safety and security

Dutch police mill about after a threat at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019. Dutch military police say that all passengers and crew are safely off a plane at the center of a security alert at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport. The military police service earlier said they were responding to a suspicious situation at the airport on the outskirts of Amsterdam. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
1010 WINS Newsroom
November 06, 2019 - 5:01 pm
SCHIPHOL, Netherlands (AP) — An accidental hijack warning set off from the cockpit of a plane triggered a big security operation at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport on Wednesday night, a Spanish airline and Dutch military police said. Air Europa said in a tweet that the scare that sent emergency...
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1010 WINS Newsroom
November 06, 2019 - 3:22 pm
SCHIPHOL, Netherlands (AP) — The Latest on a security alert at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport (all times local): 9:20 p.m. A Spanish carrier says a security alert at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport began when a hijacking warning on a plane was accidentally set off. Air Europa said in a tweet Wednesday...
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FILE - This May 6, 2013 file photo shows a wind turbine farm owned by PacifiCorp near Glenrock, Wyo. The military wants North Dakota and perhaps four other states with nuclear missile arsenals to consider new rules aimed at preventing conflicts between wind turbines and helicopters that provide security at launch facilities. Defense Department and Air Force officials were meeting Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019 with North Dakota lawmakers and regulatory officials. (AP Photo/Matt Young, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 29, 2019 - 2:11 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The military wants North Dakota and four other states with nuclear missile arsenals to consider introducing new rules aimed at preventing conflicts between wind turbines and helicopters that provide security at launch facilities. Department of Defense and Air Force officials...
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National Transportation Safety Committee investigator Nurcahyo Utomo holds a model of an airplane during a press conference in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019. An Indonesian investigation found a Lion Air flight that crashed and killed 189 people a year ago was doomed by a combination of aircraft design flaws, inadequate training and maintenance problems. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 25, 2019 - 4:04 pm
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesian investigators found plenty of blame to go around for a Boeing 737 Max crash that killed 189 people a year ago. They faulted design decisions by Boeing that made the plane vulnerable to failure of a single sensor. They criticized U.S. safety regulators who...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2019 photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for India-based Jet Airways lands following a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration are both partly at fault for the failures of the 737 Max, the plane model involved in two fatal crashes, according to a new report. The New York Times said Friday, Oct. 11 that a multiagency task force found that Boeing didn’t appropriately explain the plane’s new automated system to regulators, and the FAA didn’t have the capability to effectively analyze much of what Boeing did share about the plane. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 11, 2019 - 4:39 pm
A panel of international aviation regulators found that Boeing withheld key information about the 737 Max from pilots and regulators, and the Federal Aviation Administration lacked the expertise to understand an automated flight system implicated in two deadly crashes of Max jets. In its report...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011 file photo, A Continental Airlines Boeing 737-NG takes off in Tampa, Fla. Inspections of some older Boeing jets have turned up structural cracks in more than three dozen of them, raising a new safety issue for the company, which is already dealing with two deadly crashes involving a newer version of the same plane. Boeing said Thursday , Oct. 10, 2019 that airlines worldwide have inspected 810 planes following an order from U.S. safety regulators, and 38 or 5% had “findings” that will require repairs. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 10, 2019 - 6:21 pm
Inspections of some older Boeing jets have turned up structural cracks in more than three dozen of them, raising a new safety issue for the company already dealing with two deadly crashes involving a newer version of the same plane. Boeing said Thursday that airlines worldwide have inspected 810...
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In this photo taken Monday, Sept. 23, 2019, Yonas Yeshanew, who resigned as Ethiopian Airline's chief engineer this summer and is seeking asylum in the U.S., listens to a reporter's question during an interview in Seattle area. Yeshanew says in a whistleblower complaint filed with regulators that the carrier went into the maintenance records on a Boeing 737 Max jet a day after it crashed this year, a breach he contends was part of a pattern of corruption that included fabricating documents, signing off on shoddy repairs and even beating those who got out of line. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 07, 2019 - 11:34 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Ethiopian Airlines' former chief engineer says in a whistleblower complaint filed with regulators that the carrier went into the maintenance records on a Boeing 737 Max jet a day after it crashed this year, a breach he contends was part of a pattern of corruption that included...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, May 8, 2019 file photo, workers stand near a Boeing 737 MAX 8 jetliner being built for American Airlines prior to a test flight in Renton, Wash. The union representing Southwest Airlines pilots is suing Boeing and calling the grounded 737 Max unsafe. The Southwest Airlines Pilots Association said on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019 it filed a lawsuit against Boeing that Boeing rushed the plane into service and misled pilots by saying it was little different than previous versions of the 737. The union says those claims turned out to be false. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 07, 2019 - 7:05 pm
DALLAS (AP) — The union representing Southwest Airlines pilots is suing Boeing, saying its pilots are losing money because the company rushed an unsafe plane into service only to have the 737 Max grounded after two deadly crashes. The Southwest Airlines Pilots Association said in the lawsuit filed...
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FILE - In this April 2, 2002, file photo, the Nine-O-Nine, a Collings Foundation B-17 Flying Fortress, flies over Thomasville, Ala., during its journey from Decatur, Ala., to Mobile, Ala. A B-17 vintage World War II-era bomber plane crashed Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, just outside New England's second-busiest airport, and a fire-and-rescue operation was underway, official said. Airport officials said the plane was associated with the Collings Foundation, an educational group that brought its "Wings of Freedom" vintage aircraft display to Bradley International Airport this week. (John David Mercer/Press-Register via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
October 04, 2019 - 9:37 pm
The roar of its four engines, the plexiglass nose, the bristling machine guns — for history buffs and aviation enthusiasts, few thrills compare with that of a flight aboard aircraft like the B-17 Flying Fortress, the World War II bomber that helped smash the Nazi war machine. "It made you feel like...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2019, file photo a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for Spain-based Air Europa rolls toward takeoff before a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. The head of the Federal Aviation Administration is defending his agency's approval of a troubled Boeing plane while leaving open the possibility of changing how the agency certifies aircraft. Stephen Dickson made the comments Monday, Sept. 23, in Montreal, where he and other top FAA officials briefed aviation regulators from around the world on the agency's review of changes that Boeing is making to the 737 Max. The FAA said a senior Boeing official also gave a technical briefing. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
September 23, 2019 - 8:08 pm
The head of the Federal Aviation Administration is defending his agency's approval of a troubled Boeing plane while leaving open the possibility of changing how the agency certifies aircraft. Stephen Dickson made the comments Monday in Montreal, where he and other top FAA officials briefed aviation...
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