Automotive industry regulation

FILE- In this Oc. 21, 2018, file photo the company logo shines off the front of a vehicle at a Fiat dealership in Highlands Ranch, Colo. Fiat Chrysler is voluntarily recalling vehicles in the U.S. because they don't meet the country's emission standards. The Environmental Protection Agency says that the recall is the result of in-use emissions investigations it performed and in-use testing conducted by Fiat Chrysler as required by EPA regulations. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
March 13, 2019 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fiat Chrysler is voluntarily recalling 862,520 vehicles in the U.S. because they don't meet the country's emission standards. The Environmental Protection Agency says that the recall is the result of in-use emissions investigations it performed and in-use testing conducted by Fiat...
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March 06, 2019 - 5:33 pm
DETROIT (AP) — New vehicles in the U.S. from the 2017 model year averaged slightly better gas mileage than the previous year, rising to a record 24.9 mpg, according to an annual report from the Environmental Protection Agency. But the mileage rose only 0.2 mpg, and environmental groups say it fell...
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A protester holds an Albanian flag during an antigovernment rally in Tirana, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019. Albanian opposition supporters have surrounded the parliament building and are demanding that the government resign, claiming it's corrupt and has links to organized crime. (AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)
February 26, 2019 - 2:18 pm
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — Supporters of Albania's opposition threw flares and torched a car tire outside the country's parliament Tuesday in an attempt to block ruling lawmakers entering the building amid calls for the government to quit. The center-right Democratic Party-led opposition claims the...
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FILE- In this Sept. 24, 2008 file photo, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., right, accompanied by Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Dingell, the longest-serving member of Congress in American history who mastered legislative deal-making and was fiercely protective of Detroit's auto industry, has died at age 92. Dingell, who served in the U.S. House for 59 years before retiring in 2014, died Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019, at his home in Dearborn, said his wife, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell.(AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)
February 07, 2019 - 11:43 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Former U.S. Rep. John Dingell, the longest-serving member of Congress in American history and a master of legislative deal-making who was fiercely protective of Detroit's auto industry, has died. The Michigan Democrat was 92. Dingell, who served in the U.S. House for 59 years before...
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February 02, 2019 - 12:13 pm
BERLIN (AP) — German police say around 800 people have demonstrated in the southwestern city of Stuttgart against a new ban on driving older diesel cars. Stuttgart, a German auto industry center, on Jan. 1 became the first major German city to introduce a large-scale ban on driving older diesel...
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FILE-In this Oct. 31, 2018 file photo people queue in a traffic jam when commuting to Frankfurt, Germany. Germany's environment minister is rejecting calls for a halt to roadside emissions testing, after some 100 doctors suggested existing limits on pollutants from cars were unfounded. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
January 28, 2019 - 12:06 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Germany's environment minister rejected Monday calls for a halt to roadside emissions tests that found excessive air pollution and fueled fears of a widespread ban on diesel cars in cities. An open letter published last week and signed by some 100 doctors questioned whether existing...
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Andrew Wheeler arrives to testify at a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing to be the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
January 16, 2019 - 3:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to lead the Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday called climate change "a huge issue" but not the "greatest crisis," drawing fire from Democrats at his confirmation hearing over the regulatory rollbacks he's made in six months as the agency...
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FILE- In this Jan. 14, 2018, file photo Ford President and CEO Jim Hackett prepares to address the media at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. A new version of the Ford Explorer big SUV will be shown off at the auto show starting Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, and it will have an optional hybrid power system. It is Ford’s first hybrid SUV in six years, and the company also has plans for a fully electric SUV based on the Mustang sometime next year. Seven battery-powered vehicles are planned for the U.S. by 2022, even a hybrid pickup truck. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
January 14, 2019 - 4:46 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Automakers have promised to start selling hordes of electric cars in the next few years, but only two will be unveiled at the big Detroit auto show that kicks off this week — and those aren't even ready for production. Meanwhile, there will be plenty of SUVs and high-horsepower...
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January 07, 2019 - 7:30 am
LONDON (AP) — New vehicle sales in the U.K. fell in 2018 by their biggest rate since the global financial crisis a decade ago due to a weaker economy and a raft of regulatory changes, an industry lobby group said Monday. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders said the new car market was...
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FILE - In this Dec. 26, 2018 file photo, traffic moves slowly during a winter storm in downtown Bismarck, N.D. It is illegal in North Dakota to idle an unattended vehicle but the law is widely ignored in a state known for its brutal winters.Republican Rep. Daniel Johnston is sponsoring a bill that would make it legal for residents to routinely warm up their vehicles in the winter without being in them. The proposed measure would reverse a law on the books since the 1940s that he says the law goes against the will of the people. The current law carries a maximum $1,500 fine and 30 days in jail. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)
January 04, 2019 - 3:52 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — When the winds howl and the bone-numbing cold sets in, scores of North Dakotans willingly become lawbreakers by warming up their vehicles without being in them, ignoring a potential $1,500 state fine and 30 days in jail. "It's ineffective. The people ignore it. Let's get rid...
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